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My Address is a River: A Place to Belong, Closer to Home Paperback – August 3, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 350 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (August 3, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1450566367
  • ISBN-13: 978-1450566360
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.9 x 5.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,712,273 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

As an interfaith chaplain, teacher, counselor and social worker for many years Chris Highland has been privileged to hear and experience powerful stories of real lives at the margins of our minds and our communities. A freethinker and former Protestant Minister he has taught at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley and Dominican University of California. He teaches online courses through Cherry Hill Seminary and manages two innovative homes for active seniors. Chris is the author of Meditations of John Muir and other titles on the human relationship with the natural world. His primary website is www.naturetemple.wordpress.com where his essays, photography, poetry and videos are presented. Chris lives in Marin County, California with his wife Carol.

As an interfaith chaplain, teacher, counselor and social worker for many years Chris Highland has been privileged to hear and experience powerful stories of real lives at the margins of our minds and our communities. A freethinker and former Protestant Minister he has taught at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley and Dominican University of California. He teaches online courses through Cherry Hill Seminary. Chris is the author of Meditations of John Muir and other titles on the human relationship with the natural world. His primary website is www.naturetemple.net where his essays, photography, poetry and videos are presented. Chris lives in Marin County, California with his wife Carol.

More About the Author

*Writer, Teacher, Photographer, Poet, Social Worker, "Nature Chaplain"

Master's Degree through the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley
Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and Religion, Seattle Pacific University
Community College Teaching Credential, State of California
Faculty: College of Marin; Cherry Hill Seminary
Adjunct Faculty (former): Dominican University of California
Manager: Senior Cooperative Housing
Director: Emergency Shelter (2008-2010)
Presbyterian Minister (1987-2001)
Interfaith Chaplain (1980-2005)
Freethinker (in the tradition of Paine, Emerson, Frances Wright, Whitman, Burroughs, et al)
*
Primary website (with blogs):
www.chighland.com
*
Nature Chaplain Videos:
www.youtube.com/user/templenature

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Through years of compassionately "dwelling" among the homeless as a chaplain, and at times homeless himself, Highland and the reader learn together that "a homeseeker may indeed have something to teach about the true meaning of home." From using words like "homeseeker," "houseless" and "unhoused," to offering startling and far-reaching ideas such as "God is homeless [due to being] a flowing force," Highland shakes us out of our tired religious ruts. Through true stories of those without a home, we sense the divinity inherent in his interaction with them. Highland's prose sings out with compassion, and is filled with quotable phrase after quotable phrase. But I think now and then he tends to romanticize the spiritual riches of the poor. It is possible, too, to find spirituality and grace in interactions with the wealthy, who like everyone else, are ultimately homeless. One other problem, a structural one, is that in a sense this book consists of "too much of a good thing." So many stories, and not enough of a narrative arc to give the reader a sense of moving towards a climax and then a resolution. -Chaplain Karen B. Kaplan
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