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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "the day wept on my shoulders."
This is my favorite Opeth masterpiece. Initially, when Opeth was still new to me, it was my least favorite. It has the dreariest, grittiest production, few acoustic guitar parts (and they are mostly short), and seems even more sonically oppressive and bleak than anything else they've done. But this album is AMAZING. It is a concept album about a ghost who seems not to...
Published on January 13, 2004 by Lord Chimp

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Has Its Moments
This album is not that bad and there are a few good moments, but for the most part, it just doesn't gel with me. My biggest problem is with some of the longer pieces and the guitar meandering that just doesn't sound right.

The musicianship is excellent and there are some pretty decent tunes, but overall, this disc just didn't blow me away. Maybe some of their...
Published on January 22, 2007 by Fred Rayworth


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42 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "the day wept on my shoulders.", January 13, 2004
By 
This review is from: My Arms, Your Hearse (Audio CD)
This is my favorite Opeth masterpiece. Initially, when Opeth was still new to me, it was my least favorite. It has the dreariest, grittiest production, few acoustic guitar parts (and they are mostly short), and seems even more sonically oppressive and bleak than anything else they've done. But this album is AMAZING. It is a concept album about a ghost who seems not to realize that he's dead and he observes his lost love after his passing. "Karma" seems to be where he becomes aware of his demise and it's crushing (the scream!!! it's all about that scream). _My Arms, Your Hearse_ is heavier than _Orchid_ and _Morningrise_ but no less melodic and captivating in its evocative, spellbinding musical progression. From the haunting sounds of rain and ethereal piano notes of "Prologue", to the tidal wave of melodic riffs in "April Ethereal", to the longing, forlorn acoustic ending of "When", to the hellfire assault of "Demon of the Fall", to the smothering finality of "Karma", to the soul-melting, aching melodies of "Epilogue", MAYH is a masterpiece with few peers. No fan of progressive metal should be without this, and anyone who didn't really "get it" is strongly encouraged to give it another chance.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brutal, haunting, and unforgettable., December 21, 2001
By 
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Opeth stands at the vanguard of progressive metal. The band's first two releases, Orchid and Morningrise, were brilliant and challenging progressive albums. The band was defined by its dynamics, which pitted vicious metal & death growls against soft acoustic music. My Arms, Your Hearse, Opeth's third release, is a bit different. It is the band's most musically aggressive album, no doubt. The recording quality is very dense, almost like a din of chaotic fury. Against Opeth's complex songwriting, beautiful sensibilities, and progressive nature, most bands' music sound like the banal, empty persiflage of mere imitators.
My Arms, Your Hearse is a concept album, told through Akerfeldt stunning lyrics, which are full of brilliant imagery and involved poetry. The story is quite enigmatic and probably open to a number of interpretations. It seems to tell the story of a plaintive ghost who watches his beloved deal with the pain of his death. The liner notes pack all the lyrics into a huge block of text, so it's difficult to read. However, it is interesting the way Opeth has put it together. Each song ends with the name of the next song worked into the lyric. For instance, "The Amen Corner" finishes with the line, "The final spark that blew life into me, the demon of the fall." The next track is called "Demon of the Fall." This is an innovative way of forming lyrical "flow." Also, the lyrics for "Epilogue" end with the line, "Telling...of the beauty of its prologue." This means that everything begins all over again. This coheres with the "seasons" theme running through the album. "Prologue" presents the coming of spring. "The Amen Corner" opens with the line "white summer." "Demon of the Fall" enters the autumn term. The song "Karma" speaks of "winter's epilogue" as "the cold season drifts over the land." This puts forth a theme of recurrence to the story, which may suggest that the ghost is trapped in an everlasting cycle from which he can't escape. Those that believe in the paranormal sometimes say a spirit can be trapped in the material world because of something unresolved that happened in life, or something that anchors him there. Just food for thought, I guess. In any case, I think this adds to the brilliance of Opeth's concept. It is seriously rare that an "extreme" metal band provide such interesting lyrical content.
Vocalist Mikael Akerfeldt has improved a great deal. He has abandoned the pseudo-black metal vocals in favor of a deep, menacing growl. His "clean" vocals, however, are used more sparingly. The production also lends an audible echo to his clean singing, which fits well with the "ghost" story. Likewise, the acoustic passages on this album are also shorter than on previous records, providing less foil for the brutally heavy parts. Instead of devoting full passages to acoustic guitars, this album seems to weave them in and out, integrating them into the heavier music. For example, a section in "The Amen Corner" layers heavy riffing with delicately plucked acoustic strings and death vocals. Very cool. There are still many great acoustic sections, though. The last three minutes or so of "When" is all acoustic. The song "Credence" is 4.5 minutes of melodic acoustic guitars and clean vox, and it's a beautiful song.
The final half of this album is pure songwriting brilliance, beginning with "Demon of the Fall" and ending with "Epilogue." "Demon of the Fall" is a slashing bomb of cut-throat guitars and diabolic vocals (distorted with an effect to sound even more evil). "Credence" is stunning, as I mentioned. Akerfeldt's painful vocals harmonies are mesmerizing. "Karma" is sustained by the velocity of thrash-inflected riffage, Martin Lopez's galloping double-kick drums, but you are given room to breathe with an aching acoustic bit. "Epilogue" is absolutely gorgeous beyond words. I literally become paralyzed by heavenly guitar harmony that carries the album to the end. Good God, it's beautiful. That's not to say the rest of the album isn't great...it is. Every track is simply brilliant. However, in my opinion, Opeth saved the best for last. That's good.
In any case, this is definitely Opeth's most sonically violent album. It definitely focuses more on the band's heavy aspect, with music that sometimes resembles a black hurricane of fierceness. Still, the dichotomy of light & shade pervades and seems more accentuated by the album's heavier focus. Since I was initially drawn to Opeth because of their "softer" aspect, this album took some time to grow on me. Now, however, there is no doubt in my mind that it is every bit as good as anything they've ever done. Every Opeth album is brilliant, and My Arms, Your Hearse is no exception. Buy everything that has anything to do with this band.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning progressive-melodic-death metal at its finest!, October 6, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Ok, I just want to know why anyone would review this cd and give it less than 5 starts? This is one of the best CDs I have ever heard: musically or lyrically. This album is totaly amazing from start to finish. I am going to agree with the one who wrote the review stating that they were probably inspired by the Edge of Sanity "Crimson" CD. The concept behind My Arms, Your Hearse is strung together, telling a story, but was probably a good idea it was split apart. I love epic songs, especially "Crimson", the longer the better, but My Arms, Your Hearse does not fit as one song, although it all ties together to tell a story.
Mikael Äkerfeldt is an amazing song writer, wait until you all hear Opeth's new album "Still Life" (Releasing in Europe on October 18th), it is phenominal! The story behind My Arms,Your Hearse is just as amazing as the music. It looks as if Mikael is talking about someone who has died and went back to Earth in the form of his sprit. He starts out at his funeral and tries to reach out to his soulmate. IT is just one twisted love story. I haven't spent too long analyzing the lyrics, but what I have grasped just lets me know that Opeth is truely one of the best bands in the 90's.
All I can say is this CD is just pure metal and total energy. Opeth has the ability to capture music like no other band. They are an amazing group with lots of talent. Listen to the drummer on this CD, he is a primary example. Opeth couldn't have done a better job on creating this CD if they spent five more years on it. "When" is perfect, the only song I have ever heard and said "there is not one thing I would change about this song, it is flawless from begining to end." Without a doubt, I reccommend this CD to anyone, and to all of the perfectionists out there who like tons of talent in their music. Opeth is a true inspiration to many musicians, especially me. Buy this album, you won't regret it! Trust me, you can't get any better than this one!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite simply Opeth's best album, March 3, 2006
By 
This review is from: My Arms, Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Opeth may be the most difficult band to 'get into' for someone new to their catalogue. Unlike most metal bands that manage to release two, maybe three albums that are considered solid, Opeth has released 8 albums, each of which has stood the test of time in a genre whose audience's tastes seem to be in constant, dramatic flux. Discounting Orchid and Morningrise, both respectable early works that are mandatory if one is to comprehend Opeth's musical evolution, that leaves six albums to digest. Add to this the fact that Opeth writes epics that demand repeated listenings, and it becomes clear why listening to Opeth is indeed a formidable investment.

As many reviewers have said, My Arms, Your Hearse is a great album for someone new to Opeth. I would argue that Blackwater Park and Still Life are equally worthy of such accolades, but it is my belief that to get someone hooked on a band, you must play them the band's finest work, which for Opeth is My Arms, Your Hearse. One could easily write ten pages about Opeth. Their music reaches a compositional depth and complexity that no metal band I can think of has managed. Certainly Opeth takes inspiration from a handful of predecesors, but from the diverse assortment of bands and performers that is their influence Opeth has truly created a genre within which only they perform.

My Arms, Your Hearse is not Opeth's most polished album, nor, I would argue, is it their most thematically complete (see, Blackwater Park). What makes MAYH Opeth's finest work is a combination of several factors. Being Opeth's third release, MAYH is somewhere between the profound maturity and coherence found on later releases such as Blackwater Park and Deliverance and the more adventurous, youthful (or less focused) song writing heard on Morningrise and Orchid.

The atmospheric jazz interludes of MAYH are some of Opeth's most memorable and their live set attests to the aural beauty of any song off this album. And it is no wonder that Opeth consistently closes their sets with Demon of the Fall, arguably the most haunting and intense song the band has written.

I bought this album in 9th grade because a sticker on the front compared them to In Flames who at the time I was enjoying (this was between Whoracle and Colony, before In Flames stopped being worth listening to) so I figured I would invest in my small but growing metal collection. It took me a year to fully appreciate this album, a year before I stopped listening for parts that sounded like In Flames (of which there aren't many) and realized what a veritable masterpiece I had stumbled upon.

If you read other reviews you can get a better idea of the band's music, but hopefully I have articulated why this album, and this band, is worth investing one's self in. Because Opeth demands an investment. They are not a band for three minutes car rides or the CD player between class (although I've used them for both). To appreciate what Opeth has to offer means sitting for a half hour or longer and simply listening. After doing this five, six times and each time hearing different aspects of their music, you might begin to understand why I feel I can say that opeth is one of the most important bands in the past 10 years. But you'll have to decide for yourself.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Flawless - a great band's greatest album, April 19, 2004
This review is from: My Arms, Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Very seldom does a metal band come along that can truly mesh mind-blowing beauty with visceral power. Opeth has long been known for their ability to walk this line with probably more grace than any other band ever, and on My Arms Your Hearse their craft is at its peak.
Their grooving rhythm style is in force here, but retains some of the more aggressive rhythms of their two earlier efforts, a balance best seen on the chorus of Demon of the Fall. The result is a very hard-driving section that arouses harder headbanging than most future Opeth works. They would also never quite be as beautiful during their heavy groove sections. April Ethereal is quite possibly my favorite song of all time now due to the balance struck between that pounding brutality and awe-inspiring, majestic beauty. Later Opeth efforts tend to polarize the songs, with a monster-headbanging-heavy part followed by a stunning acoustic part. While these are also great albums, there's something special in MAYH's balance - it seems more sublime than Deliverance or even Blackwater Park.
This is the first effort by the current Opeth lineup. Bassist Johan DeFarfalla and drummer Anders Nordin had recently moved on and been replaced by the Martins - Mendez (bass) and Lopez (drums), both of whom bring entirely new feels to the rhythm section. Mikael Akerfeldt's clean voice has not matured to the fullest but is still incredibly beautiful, and his growls are as forceful as ever. Guitarists Peter Lindgren and Akerfeldt together master incredibly complex and dense harmony passages that are far more technically difficult than they sound. While their style may put off fans of pure technical flash, more thoughtful listeners will appreciate their depth and power, and may ultimately be touched in a way that few (if any) other bands can top.
There's something here for any fan of rock music. Absolutely perfect. Recommended tracks: April Ethereal (best song ever), Demon of the Fall, Credence.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sadness, rage, and longing, November 3, 2002
By 
"krakatau" (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Well, what can I say about this album? This is my favorite Opeth release, and I own them all (except for the new one). It's hard to explain exactly *why* I love this album as I do, but I will do my best.
First of all, this is a concept album. Normally, concept albums don't excite me that much, but this one is special. No, the story isn't tremendously elaborate and complicated (although it is elaborate and complex, in its own way), but the story, and the way it's told, is simply beautiful. It's the tale of a man who has died, and over the course of the album, his spirit tries in vain to communicate with his beloved, but instead, he only watches her mourn his death, and eventually fall out of love with him. The lyrics (some of the best ever written) are more or less one long prose poem, and the last word or phrase of each song is the name of the next one - a very ingenuitive method of creating flow. This also plays an interesting part in the songs 'Prologue' and 'Epilogue', whereby a cycle is implied.
And now to the music. Strangely, all of the music on this album sounds very similar to me, almost as if it's all one song. This is probably Opeth's most aggressive album, if not their heaviest (it's between this one and Blackwater Park). This aggressiveness serves to portray a sense of longing and desperation, and if the music wasn't enough to do that, then there's Mikael Åkerfeldt's searing vocals and sorrowful lyrics. He manages to throw every feeling of anger, frustration and sadness possible into his growls and screams; an impressive feat, to be sure. Then-new drummer Martin Lopez tears it up on the drumkit, especially in the songs' many drum fills. He's technical without going overboard, and there's soul in his playing. Also new to the band was bassist Martin Mendez. Mikael Åkerfeldt actually played most of the bass on this album, since most of the album was already written, so I don't know which parts featured Mendez on bass. But all of the basswork on this album is flawless, so I can only give props to both of them. The guitarwork of Mikael Åkerfeldt and Peter Lindgren is simply astounding. On this album, they moved away from the twin-guitar melodies that were so prominent on Opeth's first two albums (Orchid and Morningrise), focusing instead on creating the atmosphere with raging riffage. One need only to listen to 'Demon of the Fall' to hear what I mean.
So far, I've only concentrated on the sonic maelstrom that is so prevalent on this album, but starkly contrasting this are the many quiet acoustic passages and soft clean vocals. Make no mistake, Opeth can create an aural hurricane that can pound you into the ground, but their mellow moments are the stuff of dreams, and they know exactly where to put them. It's something to experience, feeling (for you don't just hear it, you feel it) the music go from roaring to weeping at the drop of a dime. Mikael and Peter are two of the best acoustic guitar players I've ever heard, period; and Mikael's clean vocals drip with despondence and longing.
This album is the reflection of its front cover: obscure, dark, and haunting. You can see a woman, but it is almost just a silhouette; details elude you. You can discern that she is lonely and mourning - but is she really alone?
I don't really know how to wrap this review up, because I could really just go on and on trying to describe how great this music is. The truth is, it can't be described - it can only be experienced. Listen for yourself, and only then will you know the beauty that is Opeth.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A big change, but still Opeth, January 13, 2000
By 
Gwac (The Dark Side) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
My Arms, Your Hearse makes a huge change from Morningrise, relative to Morningrise's change from Orchid (virtually none). There were some internal conflicts in the band, ultimately resulting in the replacement of the drummer, and removal of the bassist. This without a doubt contributed to the change in sound, as the previous drummer was an integral part of the development of the previous releases. The new drummer, from Amon Amarth, however, is fully capable of doing a fantastic job, and does a great job of showing this on his debut for the band. The change I keep talking about is really just a progression. After making two albums that sound nearly identical I'm sure Michael Akerfeld was anxious to create something new and refreshing. The sound of the band has shifted from the stereotypical "black/death" more towards the death end. The guitars are heavier, the drums are, well, different, and the vocals have a new deeper tone. It is a very new and refreshing sound. I would like to note, though, that although the sound has shifted towards the heavier side, it still really has very little to do with death metal. There are a few big changes in the music besides the production. First, the songs are shorter. This is not a bad thing, by any means. Opeth have started to unify each song by using fluid transitions between the hard and soft parts. This is very successful, I think. Also, Michael has decided that it's okay to sing cleanly even when using electric guitars (rather than conserving it only for acoustic interludes like on Morningrise), further blurring the line between the two extremes found on Morningrise. This is great! You can tell he is much more comfortable with his voice, and uses it confidently throughout the album. It blends surprisingly well with the electric guitars, and I wonder why this didn't happen before. The deeper growl adds a new dimension of emotion in this album. It accurately accompanies the frustrated and often depressed lyrics. Everything on this album nears perfection, and I don't see how it could be better or worse than Morningrise as a result of its drastic differences. In the end, it's more diverse and contains better songwriting in my opinion. Morningrise is such an epic album, though, that it's hard to put down. Don't be afraid that MAYH will be so different that you won't like it, though. It's still Opeth! If you liked Opeth's previous releases and you're willing to keep your mind open, give MAYH a shot. It's a fantastic album that defies the boundaries not only of metal, but of music in general.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Progressive death metal defined, March 12, 2003
By 
Ironblayde (Omaha, Nebraska, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
I've been listening to metal for a lot of years, and usually when I hear a new band, I warm up to them over time, eventually coming to appreciate what they have to offer. In all this time, there have been only two bands that really blew me away on the very first listen. The first was Metallica, as they were the first metal band I'd ever heard back in the 80s. When I heard Master of Puppets in all its splendor, I knew I'd found something that would change my outlook on music forever.
The second was Opeth. I'd been hearing about them for some time, and finally on a whim, I picked up "My Arms, Your Hearse" in a record store one fateful day. The opening of this record is unreal. The sound of rain establishes the atmosphere; a brief, simple, but haunting piano melody adds to the sense of sadness; and then, Åkerfeldt's voice fades in, and "April Ethereal" *explodes* into life. My jaw dropped and I was held transfixed throughout the entire album. Opeth is, quite simply, perhaps the finest active band in metal today.
This, their third album, is also their heaviest, so if you have not heard death metal before, MAYH may not be the best introduction to Opeth. But this is not just a brutal death metal assault; far from it. The music is heavy, and Åkerfeldt's growl is menacing indeed, but there are softer moments as well, bridges played on an acoustic guitar and outstanding "clean" vocals that contrast sharply to Opeth's harsher moments, yet sound perfectly at home. These contrasts are a large part of what makes Opeth's music so effective.
Progressive death metal is probably the best way to describe this; it is death metal with much more complex song structures. And the average Opeth song usually clocks in at eight minutes or more, yet they never wear out their welcome. This album in particular is more of a single experience than a series of isolated songs. MAYH is a concept album about a man who looks back on the world from beyond the grave, and it all flows together nicely.
As to particular tracks, "April Ethereal" will always be a favorite, especially for that initial impact on me that I'll never forget. "When" is a magnificent track as well, especially the last few minutes when Åkerfeldt's clean vocals positively shine. But the album's highlight is "Demon of the Fall," probably the heaviest song that Opeth has ever done. About two and a half minutes into the song, there's a quiet, acoustic transition that ends abruptly as Åkerfeldt erupts with one of the most frightening growls I've ever heard. I *still* shiver every time I hear it. "Credence" shows the lighter side of Opeth and will be good for those of you who may not be accustomed to death metal.
"My Arms, Your Hearse," and indeed Opeth's entire catalogue, is a must for any fan of metal, but I'd recommend Opeth to anyone, because the level of talent and musicianship on display here is unparalleled. I've introduced a lot of people to this band, and one reaction that comes up a lot is, "I love the music, but those death metal vocals are horrible." If you're not used to that, don't expect to enjoy it right away. It is an acquired taste. You may dislike the vocals at first, but given enough listens, you will come to tolerate them, and then finally, you will come to enjoy them, and understand that Opeth performed any other way just wouldn't be the same.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting situation., October 30, 2003
By 
Opporknockity (Colorado Springs) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Arms Your Hearse (Audio CD)
This was my 4th Opeth album. The first time I popped it into my CD player, I was disappointed. "This isn't what I expect from Opeth," I told myself. None of the tracks really jumped out at me; there really weren't too many hooks. For several days, I was saddened that Opeth had let me down. Then, all of a sudden, it hit me like a freight train: this is a great album. Not great in the sense of _Still Life_; this is a perfect example of an album being more than the sum of its songs. Take a single song out of here, and you'll be disappointed. Take the album, give it some time, and you'll be amazed. The ending of _When_ is a stunning, gorgeous melodic section that sweeps you off your feet, but without the proceeding _Madrigal_, it loses something. For one just beginning to delve into the Opethian realm, I wouldn't suggest this album, but at a later point, it's an absolute essential.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the one that will stand the test of time ..., December 15, 2007
By 
Master of Puppets "MoP" (Lawrence, KS United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: My Arms, Your Hearse (Audio CD)
Opeth is testament to the fact that there is always beauty to be found in places where one would least expect it - in this case, an album labeled under the "extreme progressive metal" genre. Sure, this album is heavy in the truest sense of the word, but if you invest some time and dig through the imposing wall of sound, you will realize that it has been built on a solid base of Scandinavian folk melodies and layered twin-guitar harmonies.

For a while, I have been trying hard to find a way to describe Opeth in words. This is what I been able to put together so far: take a bunch of hopeless romantics (who also happen to be gifted musicians), give them guitars and drums and ask them to play mind-numbingly heavy and blisteringly fast music. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you Opeth ...

This is Opeth's 3rd album, and in my humble opinion, the one that will eventually stand the test of time. Their first album was like - "Dude, we just discovered something new and incredible, now what the heck do we do with it ?". Their second album, "Morningrise" improved on the first, and had better musicianship (in fact, it sported several acoustic twin-guitar harmonies that made that album very special to me). MAYH marks a turning point in Opeth's sound - it is much more organized with shorter songs that don't meander into netherland (not that there is anything wrong with "meandering" - it is subjective), and also the overall sound is much heavier (yet the melody is still there). This is arguably one of Opeth's heaviest albums, and probably the first one to consistently feature Opeth's trademark "melodic/heavy/sad/powerful/epic"-sounding riffs (or just "Opethian"-riffs for brevity).

Just like other Opeth albums, MAYH is a concept album that describes an over-the-top love story - though, with a slight twist - one of the lovers is a dead guy (or a ghost to be precise). This guy dies before the beginning of the album and for a short while he doesn't know that he is dead yet (and by the way, this album was released in 1998 - an year before "The Sixth Sense" was released). For most of the album, this ghost watches in agony as his wife (or lover) suffers in grief unable to cope with the loss of her loved one. He (being a ghost and all) is powerless and unable to comfort her. The only time they are able to have a real conversation is through her dreams where "she laughing and weeping at once, says: 'take me away'", for which he responds, "I don't know how or why, and I'll never know WHEN.". And so on and so forth goes the story as his other attempts to reach her (as in the "Demon of The Fall") end in disaster as she starts to think that she is being haunted, and it drives her further into madness. Realizing this, he decides that the best way out of this is to let her be, and he simply walks away ...

A few special notes are in order about this album: the ending lyrics of all the songs are the same as the title of the following song (the ending lyric of the last song is the same as the title of the first song). All the songs represent different seasons - the first full song "April Ethereal" starts (obviously) in the spring, and the album moves on to summer (on the "Amen Corner"), and into the fall (on "Demon of the Fall") and finally ends in winter's "Epilogue" (which starts the next "Prologue", and so it goes on ...).

Musically, this is clearly one of Opeth's best works. It starts with "Prologue" that sets the mood for the rest of the album. You hear raindrops on the background followed by a gentle piano intro that forebodes the sadness that is to follow ... "April Ethereal" then starts with fade-in vocals and immediately bursts into massive riffs followed by Akerfeld's imperious growl and the rest is ... well, you just have to listen to find out. Trying to describe Opeth's songs using words is always a very difficult thing to do. But, I do want to mention a few musical highlights: this album features several unique riffs that follow some sort of a "question/answer" format - more precisely - the first part of the riff appears to ask a question that is answered by the second part of the riff (Ok. maybe, I am imagining things here ... or maybe not). Just listen to the riff that begins around 4:40 into the "April Ethereal", or the riff around 5:50 into "When", and you might understand what I am trying to say. Also, a special mention is in order for the outros of "April Ethereal" and "Demon of the Fall" - these are priceless gems, and the absolute head-banging beauty that launches the "Amen Corner".

All said, I do have a few minor quibbles. For example, I felt that the gear shift from the "Prologue" to "April Ethereal" was bit too abrupt for my taste. Also, some middle sections of the "Amen Corner" could have been a bit more interesting. It is definitely the album's weakest point (although, for an album of this calibre, that doesn't mean much).

Overall, this is a masterpiece - enough said.

"... Amidst the forest one would hear that I had been there. Draped within a fate I could not change, and always welcoming Winter's EPILOGUE ..."
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My Arms, Your Hearse
My Arms, Your Hearse by Opeth (Audio CD - 2003)
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