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My Dyslexia Hardcover – September 6, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 128 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (September 6, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393079643
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393079647
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #655,047 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Under the rubric of 'inspirationally instructive,' Schultz offers a compact book. Yet, writing with a focused mind, he dilates at length on the struggle within that mind.” (Kirkus)

“Starred review. [Shultz's] affecting prose will inspire compassion and leave readers with an understanding not only of dyslexia, but of the lifelong challenges that someone with disabilities may face.” (Publisher's Weekly)

“This beautifully written and compact memoir chronicles the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet's journey through life as a dyslexic. ...His story will resonate with any young adult who may be dealing with a learning disability, and it will promote understanding and perhaps compassion in others.” (Vicki Emery - School Library Journal)

About the Author

Philip Schultz is the author of seven collections of poetry, including the Pulitzer Prize-winning Failure, and the memoir My Dyslexia. He is the founder and director of the Writers Studio and lives in East Hampton, New York.

More About the Author

PHILIP SCHULTZ won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for his most recent book of poems, Failure. His poetry and fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, the Nation, the New Republic, and the Paris Review, among other magazines. In addition, he is the founder and director of the Writers Studio in New York.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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See all 24 customer reviews
Well-written and interesting.
Gail
Mr. Schultz gives insight into both how his brain decodes language and the psychological effects that difference created for him.
Anton Gruenewald
Anyone who went to elementary school in the fifties knows the scenes described in Philip Schultz's memoir "My Dyslexia."
M. Feldman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Sandie Barrie Blackley on September 11, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a speech-language pathologist specializing in reading and written language disorders. Our company, Lexercise.com, has been working hard to make affordable, professional evaluation and treatment available online to dyslexics no matter where they live. I have written a post for the Lexercise.com blog encouraging dyslexics, parents and practitioners to read My Dyslexia.

Schultz title, My Dyslexia, lets readers know that he is describing is HIS journey with this occult and often poorly understood condition. Schultz says that his self-awareness "was fashioned by years of psychotherapy and self-analysis and introspection necessary to the writing of poetry." He describes the confusion of trying to understand "where my dyslexia stopped and some bizarre emotional problem began."

This isn't a new story. There are many other accounts written by dyslexics. Contemporary research journals document the negative academic, social and emotional cascade associated with dyslexia. But Schultz uses his poetic, narrator's voice to tell a particularly compelling and moving personal story. His descriptions are concise and visceral, just what you'd expect of an award-winning poet. He describes his childhood with a mother, who believed in him and saw his talents, yet didn't know where to turn for help: "I can well imagine the disheveled logic and desperation that went into her not seeking help for me, except for the remedial help forced on her by my school."

One of my favorite descriptions is of the moment when Schultz first experienced reading: "The process of leaping over my own incapacities to the excitement in the narrator's voice...."; "I seemed to be 'listening' (not reading) to a voice in my own head, to a personage invented by my own fantasies.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By PC on September 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I discovered the author reading his opinion piece in the New York Times, "Words failed, then saved me". I downloaded the book thinking I could read it with my dyslexic daughter and ADHD son, but when I tried to read my favorite passages to my wife, I was unable, not because I'm dyslexic, but because the emotion overwhelmed me. This poet explains dyslexia like no medical doctor ever could.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Brock & Fernette Eide on September 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In "My Dyslexia" Philip Schultz provides a detailed and highly moving account of what it's like to have a dyslexic kind of brain, and to grow up in a world where such brains are neither understood nor valued. Schultz beautifully illustrates many of the cognitive advantages often associated with dyslexia, and which "dyslexic wiring" is actually intended to produce. In our book The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain we describe these advantages in detail as we have witnessed them in our work as physicians specializing in learning differences, and as described in the neurosciences literature. In reflecting on his own strengths, Schultz attributes the amazing creativity that fuels his award winning poetry largely to the habits his dyslexia has forced him to develop of searching for new solutions to challenges that non-dyslexics deal with unthinkingly. While this training by adversity is clearly important, a growing body of research also suggests that many dyslexic talents--like Philip's remarkable poetic strengths in areas like metaphor and analogy, his ability to assume the perspective of narrators with points of view very different from his own, and his remarkably vivid memory for personal experiences which he is able to reweave into new events and episodes--are also supported directly by the same sorts of brain wiring differences that result in dyslexia-related learning challenges.Read more ›
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Anton Gruenewald on September 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
My Dyslexia should be required reading for ALL current and prospective teachers and school administrators. Mr. Schultz gives insight into both how his brain decodes language and the psychological effects that difference created for him. It's a slim volume, but worth every penny for someone who works with people with learning differences (me), is the parent of someone with a learning difference, or is an educator who will inevitably encounter a student with a learning difference. (20% of the population, no matter how your local/state dept. of education tries to deny/ignore it.)

I'm also a poet and there are also some great tips for writers, both novices and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Thank you for this wonderful book Mr. Schultz!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Wong VINE VOICE on September 15, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a little gem of a book. I read the whole book in less than two hours but learned so much about the experience of having dyslexia. Even though Philip Schultz won a Pulitzer Prize for `Failure', a collection of poetry, he did not learn to read until he was eleven years old. He did not even find out that he had dyslexia until he was 58! He learned that he had it when his son was diagnosed with it.

Before reading this, I wondered how a man with dyslexia could become a poet. For me it is a very difficult task to write poetry and I don't have to deal with dyslexia. But then, I remembered my friend who is a child psychiatrist who is dyslexic. Because of the tremendous amount of reading that she had in medical school, she hired a reader but she made it through because she was very determined and incredibly intelligent. Philip Schultz has those same qualities.

Mr. Schultz related the effect of having dyslexia in school and not knowing that he had it. His mind was his enemy. To escape teasing from his classmates, he stole coins from his father's vending machine proceeds to eat in a restaurant every school day. He ate the same thing each time even though he hated it. He couldn't read the menu; he ordered what he overheard being ordered. He thought of himself as being a dummy because he was put in a slow class and that is what other kids called him.

His life was filled with emotional pain and anxiety. His mind was truly his enemy. Then in his sophomore year, he fell in love with books. He still could not read them without a huge struggle but he loved them.

This book tells of the emotional journey that Mr. Schultz struggled through until he found that his brain was different from others. He found out that instead of being a dummy he was intelligent.
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