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My Fundamentalist Education: A Memoir of a Divine Girlhood Hardcover – Bargain Price, December 27, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 232 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs (December 27, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586482580
  • ASIN: B000VYPZ0K
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,673,136 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rex M. Rogers on January 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
With remarkable detail and alacrity, Rosen recalls her childhood experiences at St. Petersburg's Keswick Christian School. Her Mother was and is a Pentecostal believer, divorced from her Father and remarried, so every other weekend Rosen and her sisters bounced from their Father and new Mom's home to "BioMom's" with accompanying differences in religious views and practices.

The author at times borders on biting the hand that fed her, making fun of her Mother, questioning various aspects of her experience, and in the end rejecting Christian faith. According to her, Rosen is not religious today in any particular way, a choice that is reinforced by her marriage to a non-religious Jew. So she believes she has outgrown what she was taught, and she believes she stands above and outside of it. Yet she acknowledges that she learned, she was loved, she was offered security, spiritually and otherwise, in a faith community, and she recognizes today that her BioMom was not as wacky as she once considered her.

Having grown up in a very conservative religious, even fundamentalist home, I recognized some of the author's experience, including both the stressful and funny parts. I didn't identify with her angst, so I wonder how much of her feelings and eventual spiritual decision-making are rooted in what some call a "broken home," i.e. parents who divorced when kids had no say in it, and how much of her present worldview is actually grounded in her youthful religious exposure. It's hard to say.

This book is slow moving at times and at others is clearly a book written by a woman for women, but it is also a case study in how someone processes her faith-based upbringing from the vantage point of faithless adulthood.
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