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My Hope for Peace Hardcover – Bargain Price, March 24, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press (March 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416592199
  • ASIN: B002PJ4HWG
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,501,096 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Widow of the assassinated Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, Jehan Sadat (A Woman of Egypt) fashions a gracious plea for better understanding between the East and West, especially in terms of the fundamentals of Islam and the derailed Middle East peace process. Sadat is avowedly feminist, having established programs for women's literacy and empowerment during her husband's presidency (he served from 1970 until his assassination in 1981), attained her own advanced degrees in her 40s and indeed was a visible Muslim first lady who accompanied her husband around the world. In these eight elegant, evenhanded essays, she delineates Sadat's principles for peace, put in motion when he signed the Camp David Accords with leaders Carter and Begin in 1978, by addressing the misconceptions about Islam (exacerbated since 9/11), specifically that all Muslims are extremists, against democracy and bent on subjugating their women. She sketches briefly the sticking points to the peace process, namely Israeli intransigence and the Arab-Israeli tit-for-tat in escalating violence, and stresses firsthand the senselessness of assassinations and terrorism. Her essay On Being a Muslim Woman gently rebuffs the Western notion that Muslim women need to be liberated from Islam, offering examples of famous Egyptian feminists as well as employing her own notable achievements. Sadat provides an important, insistent voice for continued advancement in peace and social justice. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Sadat, widow of Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, who was assassinated in 1981, offers a passionate appeal for peace. A scholar, feminist, and activist, Sadat approaches peace from the perspective of a woman wanting to reexamine the legacy of her husband, who won a joint Nobel Peace Prize with Menachem Begin for their work on the Egypt-Israeli peace treaty; a closer examination of Islamic faith and misconceptions that link the faith to violence; and, finally, a personal reflection on inner peace after 9/11. She debunks the notion that Islam is antithetical to feminism and peace, offering personal observations of life as a Muslim woman. Drawing on principles her husband espoused during the peace process with Israel, Sadat offers practical approaches for achieving peace, appealing to governments and international organizations to compromise and negotiate treaties. On an individual level, she counsels faith and forgiveness. On the thirtieth anniversary of the Egypt-Israel peace treaty, this is a thoughtful, impassioned appeal by a woman who has witnessed violence and peace and come to personal terms with both. --Vanessa Bush

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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It's a truly fascinating book and well worth the time to read.
Chris Swanson
This is very important, and this author's appealing voice will help give readers a window into just what that, very seldom heard from, majority really think.
Matthew Smith
I'd recommend this book to anyone interested in recent history or word affairs, especially those interested in the Middle East.
Debbie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Smith on April 2, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I really hope this book will appeal to a wide audience, and bring in some readers who may not be very familiar with Muslims, Islam and Middle East history because I think this has an appeal that might get people interested in learning about these crucial topics. The style is intimate which really gives the book an emotional appeal and helps drive the reading.

What I really like about this book is that it gives readers an introduction into moderate Islam. I think this is where the strength of this book lies. So often in US media all we get to see of Islam is bin Laden and his radical cohorts preaching violence and hate, or pictures of men in ski masks firing their Kalashnikovs or rockets, but with this book we get to hear the voice of the other billion Muslims who are not violent or hate filled. This is very important, and this author's appealing voice will help give readers a window into just what that, very seldom heard from, majority really think. Also I was glad to see that she offered readers the much needed female perspective of Islam as well. It was nice to see that the author points out that just because some Muslim societies may be patriarchal that doesn't mean that Islam itself is a sexist religion.

For those unfamiliar with Egyptian and this regions history, the author provides a very nice thumbnail sketch of the recent history. This sketch is even handed in its proportioning of blame for failure and its lauding of success. The author provides an adequate timeline of major events in this area that provides the reader with the major points they need to know to better understand this area.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Erika Borsos VINE VOICE on April 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Dr. Jehan Sadat writes with first hand knowledge of the peace process and her hopes that remain alive for this to happen in our lifetime, in the Middle East, between Israel and the Palestinians. The book is partly an autobiography, partly modern day Middle Eastern history, and partly a revelation of Mrs. Sadat's personal faith in her Muslim religion. She discusses her ideas with clarity and precision. Her husband, President Anwar Sadat, was the first leader of a predominantly Muslim country, in fact, a neighboring country to Israel, who dared to take the courageous step of recognizing Israel's right to exist. He paid dearly for the peace initiative he proposed in 1979 between Egypt and Israel. Mrs. Sadat writes that President Sadat did the unthinkable, he visited Israel and addressied the Knesset, the legislative body of Israel proving his sincerity toward achieving a lasting peace with his former enemy. He knew the risks and boldly stood up for what he believed ...

This is an important book by an influential Muslim woman leader who has built a new life for herself since the assassination of her husband. She speaks with experience, knowledge and authority. She dares to address difficult and complex issues related to achieving peace between the Palestinians and Israelis. She demonstrates how both of them are accountable for decisions and actions that have hindered the peace process in the past.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jojoleb VINE VOICE on March 30, 2009
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Having just read Jimmy Carter's latest book, We Can Have Peace in the Holy Land: A Plan That Will Work, I thought that Jehan Sadat's book would be written in a similar vein. I was wrong. The books do make intriguing bookends in the search for Middle Eastern peace, but approach this goal in very different ways.

Whether you believe Carter's plan would work or not, his book was more focused on the Arab-Israeli conflict. He explores the history of this conflict and explores what he feels is a viable solution.

Jehan Sadat's book, however, is more of a collection of essays on a variety of topics. As she states late in the book, these are more her overall hopes for the Middle East, rather than simply her hopes for peace. Even so, her essays contain topics that are germane to the Arab-Israeli conflict, but also explore the general misunderstandings of Islam that occur in the Western world, decry radical approaches to Islam, describe Arab-Arab conflicts, and place particular emphasis on the growing feminist movement in the Islamic world. There is not a specific narrative here, but Sadat moves easily from topic to topic and always has insights to share along the way. She places all this within the context of Egyptian history and the bold domestic and foreign policies of Anwar Sadat. Unlike Carter, Jehan Sadat does not suggest a specific plan for peace.

Sadat's essays are eloquent and evince evidence of her personal experience and scholarship. She writes from the perspective of an academic, political reformer in her own right, womens' rights advocate, and former first lady of Egypt. She also writes from the perspective of a woman who was raised in an upper middle class family to an Egyptian, Muslim father and a British, Christian mother.
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