My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic Volume 4
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$11.39+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 8, 2014
Another fantastic magical addition to the MLP universe as a stallion who has a remarkable resemblance to Disney's Captain Jack Sparrow shows up while Princess Twilight and friends are enjoying the beach and convince to girls into going treasure hunting. The story give some basis on all the Rarity vs the giant crab fan art I see floating about the internet as well as makes fans want to see the G4 versions of the sea ponies that appear in this story make their way to the show. In addition to their pirate story we have a story that seems a bit like something from Warner Brothers Looney Tunes as a magical book worm has Twilight, Rarity, Rainbow and Pinkie jumping from one storybook to another while Applejack and the others deal with the characters they replace who pop up in Ponyville.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 16, 2014
There are two stories in this one, one about pirates and another about story books. Everypony in pirate dress-up was adorable, and it included the sea ponies from previous generations. They are a lot fancier here though, and they look very pretty. The other story was fun, I liked seeing different ponies give their take on different story genres. The reference to romance novels made me laugh. If you like seeing pony versions of fictional characters you will enjoy identifying all the different villains.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 24, 2014
Just like all the other fantastic comics that have come out for My Little Pony, this was a great read that had me entertained all the way through and highly satisfied by the end of the book. Definitely one of the better stories that have been told so far in this series.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 31, 2014
This My Little Pony comic series is one of my favorites. The pony pirates are adorable and the story is top-notch. Pony parodies of classic literary charictors make this book a must-read. I am not going to give too much away, but it is definitely worth a read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 4, 2015
Whoever could have predicted that "My Little Pony," of all the franchises out there, would become such a phenomenon? Or that adults, even grown men, would admit to watching and liking the show in a non-ironic way? Usually viewed as a TV show and toy line for little girls, the latest show in the series, "My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic," has gone beyond the clichés of its genre to become a rollicking adventure and humor series, with great characters, clever jokes, and plenty of references for the adults that almost never cross over into "inappropriate" territory. In short, it's a show that adults and kids can watch together and enjoy in equal measure. And Hasbro has capitalized on this with merchandise, five seasons' worth of episodes, and a line of comics in partnership with IDW. Said comics tend to be more action-oriented and even somewhat darker than the show, but they remain fun and packed with jokes and references for the readers.

Volume 4 contains two adventures following Twilight Sparkle and her friends, and both these adventures are quite fun, suitable for both kids and adults, and full to the brim of references and shout-outs that should appeal to fans of all ages.

The first adventure takes on a subject that has yet to tackle -- pirates! A trip to the beach to release Fluttershy's fish friend, Gil, back into the wild results in the Mane Six being recruited by Hoofbeard, a Jack-Sparrow-esque pirate out on a quest to find treasure. But the Six soon find that there's something fishy about Hoofbeard's quest, and they'll find themselves tackling a rowdy gang of rival pirates, a giant crab, and the treacherous high seas to discover the truth. The second adventure has mysterious cocoons popping up all over Ponyville... and the books in Twilight's library ravaged by a rampaging bookworm. To restore the books and defeat the bookworm, Twilight and her friends have to enter the books themselves and create adventures to fight him. But even as they try to stop the creature, the cocoons open... and Ponyville is soon swarming with the heroes and villains of the books themselves. Can Twilight and the gang save Ponyville from the machinations of an evil storybook Queen and stop the bookworm from ruining Twilight's library?

As always, the art style of this series is a ton of fun to look at, with eye-catching colors and a style that's faithful to the cartoon but still dynamic and stylish. There's just enough detail to be interesting, but not so much that it clutters the page. And the illustrators stuff the story full of sight gags and references to other series -- Hoofbeard looks like a pony version of Jack Sparrow, the pirate story has plenty of homages to "Pirates of the Caribbean" and the "One Piece" manga and anime ("One Piece" fans, see if you can find the pony versions of Luffy, Sanji, and Zoro!), and there are so many book and movie characters in the bookworm arc that it takes a few readings or a sharp eye to catch them all -- "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves," "Harry Potter," "Rapunzel," "Avengers," "Game of Thrones," "Chronicles of Narnia," "Star Trek," and many more!

The stories are fun and exciting as well, with a sense of epicness that the show usually reserves for its season openers and finales. The pirate arc was a ton of fun, and makes me wish the show writers would incorporate a high-seas adventure of some kind into the cartoon proper. The bookworm arc was a lot of fun too, with the power of imagination powering the story and a love of literature shining through. And like the show, each adventure has an underlying message, though these never feel tacked on or wedged uncomfortably into the story.

If you like the show, this comic is perfect for you. It's an adventure that both adults and kids can enjoy -- adults won't be turned off by the "cutesy" characters, and it's not too dark for kids to enjoy. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 15, 2014
Taking a "page" from Pagemaster, the next 2-issue story arc from the regular comic series has characters from pony literature breaking the fourth wall and entering the real world of technicolor talking ponies. But even with pony-versions of Loki and Voldemort running around, this particular chapter manages to go outside the lines of the TV show's continuity. BTW, there was never really an official title for this chapter, so I'm just taking a hint from some old 90s anime dubs and calling it the "Bookworm Saga".

In the first issue, large cocoons appear all over Ponyville what Pinkie calls "schmarfelpods", and most of the books in Golden Oak Library have been chomped up. Twilight finds a bookworm is the culprit who manages to escape into the book. This leads Spike to conclude that if a magical comic book could pull someone into its world that they could use similar magic to go into the world of the books to catch the worm(an interesting callback to Season 4 episode meaning this takes place sometime after it). Twilight, Pinkie, Rarity, and Rainbow follow the worm into a fairytale book where they become the characters in the stories like "Pinkie Hood" and "Raritypunzel", which makes you wonder what the actual names are of these human world fictional characters in the regular Ponyverse. They then go into a Daring Do story with Rainbow portraying her heroine, while in the real world a version of Daring Do appears from a schmarfelpod in front of Applejack, Spike and Fluttershy. Probably not the actual Daring Do but a version of the character from the books brought to life, so you'd really have to wonder what would happen if A.K. Yearling met up with her fictional counterpart. Meanwhile in the book dimension, the other ponies follow the worm down the rabbit hole from story to story who keeps getting bigger after consuming each book, and once he eats one of the characters they end up manifesting in the real world, including pony versions of Tarzan and the Evil Queen. The girls eventually get stuck in some kind of null space inbetween book worlds where the worm has already eaten the story, sounding somewhat similar to the "Twilight Zone" from where Twilight was turned into an alicorn.

In the next issue, the girls manage to get out of the blank dimension by coming up with their own story which manifests into a Middle Earth type world where they spend a long time on a quest to a volcano, and even Dash asks why they don't just fly to it. The strange thing here is whether or not there was an actual Lord Of The Rings allegory in Equestrian literature for our heroes to base this on, or if its just something Pinkie came up with on the spot, although to spice it up she concocts some White-Walker ponies from Game Of Thrones, so Pinkie could have a whole other career as a fantasy author. Dash uses her made-up Rainbow Vision to turn the zombie ponies back to normal, and then rewrites the story to become Captain Kirk on a spaceship(so...this means Star Trek exists in Equestria?). Out in the real world, the CMC threaten the Evil Queen by blabbing that the Mane 6 will blast her to the moon with the Elements of Harmony, which couldn't happen though because at this point in the TV show the Elements were given back to the Tree of Harmony. In order to try and get their friends back, Spike, AJ, Fluttershy, and Daring Do come up with their own comic about how the Evil Queen has imprisoned them. Back inside the book world, the girls are being chased by a now monster-sized bookworm, but somehow end up in the comic their friends had drawn. They convince the worm to understand the damage he's caused, and make it back to the real world, thus sending all the fictional characters back to their own books. The bookworm then leaves planning on spreading the word of friendship to other bookworms, which possibly ties into the appearance of another bookworm in the Rainbow Dash chapter book.

This was a bizarre look into the world of Equestrian literature, and surprising how much of it is modeled after our own. It would've been nice to see some more original works like Daring Do other than just pony versions of books from our world.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 17, 2014
Pirate ponies? That's plain awesome. Indeed, this is the best of the first four in my opinion. Lots of adventure, great jokes, and plenty of swashbucklin'. Aye. Get this one for sure if you like My Little Pony.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
The art direction remains stellar in this fourth volume of the Friendship Is Magic comics. Lots of bright vibrant colors and sharply drawn characters. The facial expressions convey emotion excellently.

The comics themselves are split in to two two comic story arcs. The first involving pirates and the second a bookworm run amok. The comics have the distinction of having more humor aimed at an older demographic. I doubt the show's target demographic is familiar with Star Trek. And in the first volume of the comics, there were references to David Bowie. If you're an adult fan of the show, it's a welcome bonus. It's like a wink and a nod to the bronies among us.

However, the book does loose some points on the story side. The first story arc is basically a reverse Little Mermaid meets pirates. It isn't particularly inspiring. The second story arc is more interesting and involves entering books to stop an unintentionally destructive bookworm. The writers give themselves a bit more free reign here to let the story take them where it will.

It isn't bad, but I enjoyed the earlier volumes more.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 15, 2014
this was a great buy! every page is filled with lovely color pictures.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 7, 2014
I always purchase the individual issues, as well as the Volume (easier to lend to friends who haven't read the comics yet and want to get into it. As usual several stories are combined into one volume, additional coverart is included, and its packaged nicely in a softcover novel style package. If you dont want to get the issues, you can get this every so often, or you can get this in addition to so you have it all.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.