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My Name is Rachel Corrie Paperback – September 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Theatre Communications Group (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559362960
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559362962
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #565,974 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Funny, passionate, bristling with idealism and luminously intelligent, Corrie emerges as a bona fide hero for this brutalised world of ours' Time Out 'Theatre can't change the world. But what it can do, when it's as good as this, is to send us out enriched by other people's passionate concern' The Guardian --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Rachel Corrie was born in 1979 into a middle-class family in Olympia, Washington. She became politically active on what she called 'anti-war/global justice issues', which homed in on US support for Israel against the Palestinians.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
She stayed with families as she did her relief work.
Geraldine M. Goldberg
Dramatists have put together an excellent portrayal of Rachel and some of the conflicts of her life experience.
Edi
In this book you get to experience her life the way that she did.
Robin N. McMahon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Robin N. McMahon on February 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
I think that this book has the ability to capture a person's attention on an emotional level as well as a political one. Rachel Corrie was a very profound writer, even as a teenager. In this book you get to experience her life the way that she did. She was a very special person and you can see that as you read this book. It was a tragedy the way she died, and I think that this book kind of does her memory some justice.
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54 of 71 people found the following review helpful By J. Glynn on May 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
This tiny 52 page book is one of the most important pieces that I have read in my life. Rachel Corrie's writing, backed up by her work as a 5th grader and as an adult, is humbling. Alan Rickman's editing and placement is briliant.

This book should be on every book club's list and on every thearter company's stage.
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55 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Martin E. Zimmann on May 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book. This story. This life. This world-- it's all in there. It should be part of social science curriculum in high schools and colleges. Rachel was a person of conviction. Her life and witness inspire us all.
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34 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Molly Myers on June 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
Ms. Corrie belonged to the ISM (International Solidarity movement), not the PSM. The ISM is an organization dedicated to non-violence.
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26 of 36 people found the following review helpful By cvairag VINE VOICE on September 17, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Rachel Corrie's communications in the weeks preceding her death, herein collected, are among the most elegant of testimonies to what is best in the human spirit. Rachel wrote, as she lived, for what counts, with precision, passion, and single-minded devotion.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mohamed Mughal on April 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
The ceiling in Rachel Corrie's second grade classroom had rules hanging from it. Years later, the only one she remembered was "Everyone Must Feel Safe." That rule seems a philosophical impetus to joining the International Solidarity Movement in Gaza in 2003.

From a literary perspective, I'm intrigued at how well the play uses non-dialogue devices as tools for characterization. At one point, Corrie reads from her notebook; she recites a list of five people who she'd like to "hang out with" in eternity. These people are Rainer Maria Rilke, Jesus, ee cummings, Gertrude Stein, and Zelda Fitzgerald...and then Corrie adds a sixth: Charlie Chaplin. Very quickly, the audience knows that this is a young woman of imagination with a passion for creative expression and a personal philosophy that espouses turning the other cheek. The sixth addition to the list tells us that she has a great sense of humor and that she's unbound by the world's strictures. After all, given a choice of five, she goes outside the box and picks six.

The overall impression I'm left with after experiencing this play is one of hope, hope that human courage will compel us to stand against and oppose that which we believe is wrong. I have no doubt that had she had the chance, Rachel Corrie would have stood in front of the Gestapo when they came to round up innocent families for the trains. And that, too, would have been the courageous and right thing to do.
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35 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Charles F. Held Jr. on September 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural address succinctly defines sensible foreign policy: "Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none." Obviously the US has violated Jefferson's wisdom and spirit with greater, more intense, more expensive, and more tragic frequency. There is hardly a nation on the planet where the United States has not engaged in overt or covert military action - or taken sides based solely on political considerations.

Nowhere have these violations been more blatant or more bloody than in the Middle East. The US-Israel relationship is not merely an "entangling alliance", it is suffocating double-standard. Israel is the region's only nuclear power, yet it refuses to acknowledge it, imprisons those who talk about it, and shuts its doors to IAEA inspectors. It claims to be a US ally, yet it deliberately attacked the USS Liberty and engaged in multiple spying operations including the Jonathan Pollard and Larry Franklin affairs. And it the only nation receiving US military aid which is not required to spend that aid with American companies.

From Lyndon Johnson through George W. Bush, US presidents have been arrogant enough to believe that they can act as "mediators" in Middle Eastern conflicts, despite the overwhelming pro-Israel bias of American policy in the region. Add to that American ignorance of the local cultures and customs - Arab and Israeli both - and you have a recipe for repeated disaster which culminated in September of 2001. After all, if another nation tried to do to the US what the US is doing to sovereign Arab nations, what would we do? That's right, bomb the snot out of them, with 100% justification.
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