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My Sister and I (New Traveller's Companion) Paperback – March 1, 2007


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New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: New Traveller's Companion
  • Paperback: 276 pages
  • Publisher: olympiapress.com (March 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596544910
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596544918
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 4.9 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,054,719 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Free Mason on April 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
I read Walter Kaufmann's articles, available in the AMOK publication of this book, in which he explains why this book is a forgery, I'll share some of the reasons: The original manuscript of this book in German supposedly "disappeared" according to Samuel Roth, owner of the original publisher, Seven Sirens Press. Roth was known for publishing other forgeries of famous authors, including a fake sequel to Lady Chatterley's Lover. Roth claimed Oscar Levy translated it, but Oscar Levy had died 4 years before this was published, and while Levy EDITED his "Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche" Levy never considered his English good enough to do the translations himself! If you look at Levy's "Complete Works", he's always listed as the editor but never the translator, so it's very unlikely that he would consider his English good enough for this book but none of Nietzsche's other books, and it's very unlikely that Levy would leave this book out of his Complete Works series and instead sell it to a guy known for publishing forgeries. Levy's daughter denounced the book as a forgery and stated that her father had nothing to do with it. George David Plotkin, a minor author, confessed to Kaufmann shortly before his death that he wrote this book for Roth.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 25, 2005
Format: Unknown Binding
The preeminent scholar of Nietzsche, Prof. Walter Kaufman, has obtained a written confession from the "translator" (Levy) that this book was in fact written in English by Levy. There was no original German manuscript by Nietzsche. This book is not by Nietzsche, and is not worth reading.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Duncan Spence on March 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Of course it would be threatening to academic followers and/or readers of Nietzsche to learn that in the wake of his father's death (as a result of injuries sustained to his head after tripping over the family dog), his sister Elizabeth crept into his bed at night for comfort because their mother had switched off emotionally, and that during their lives Elizabeth and Friedrich developed a very close turbulent and incestuous relationship - which for Friedrich ruled out any kind of intimacy with women for the rest of his life.

Whatever arguments are presented in relation to its authenticity, this book demonstrates magnificently that the thoughts and ideas expressed in the accepted works of Nietzsche are based not on the high ideals of the Greeks, but on the psychology of having been left fatherless and under the power of women from a very early age, from the particular contradictions prejudices and delusions that this growing human male had to deal with during that particular life.

It is a rather tawdry tale which nevertheless points out the connections between the "man" and the "philosophy" - particulary Nietzsche's alleged mysogyny, and that reveals a vulnerable naive and trepidatious human being, incarcerated in an asylum, facing death, already experiencing seizures paralysis and insanity. Having moreover just discovered that his crisp autobiographical statement to the world in Ecce Homo is not going to be published because his sister has forbidden it. At the same time though he is aware that she is already starting an archive of his oeuvre so that the Nietzschean philosophers who are beginning to make themselves known will have some resource with which to work.

The one who is supposed to have faked this tragedy is skilled indeed in psychology and psychoanalysis.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Commodore Sloat on January 30, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Nietzsche's authorship of this work is in dispute. One reviewer claims Levy would not sanction a forgery, but I find it interesting that Levy chose not to include it in the Complete Works of Nietzsche that he edited. I've read it, and whoever wrote it sounds a hell of a lot like Nietzsche. It's an interesting work whether or not it is authentic. I don't quite buy the idea that his sister commissioned it since it does not make her look very good. It is possible that the motivation of claims of inauthenticity is a need to protect Nietzsche's reputation in the eyes of puritanical fans and that the work is indeed authentic, but it is also possible that it is a forgery (it sounds like him, but his style is easily parodied).
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