My Sister's Hand in Mine: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$11.84
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.00
  • Save: $6.16 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
My Sister's Hand in Mine:... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

My Sister's Hand in Mine: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles (FSG Classics) Paperback – August 25, 2005


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.84
$7.84 $5.33
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

My Sister's Hand in Mine: The Collected Works of Jane Bowles (FSG Classics) + A Little Original Sin: The Life and Work of Jane Bowles
Price for both: $41.19

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Series: FSG Classics
  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (August 25, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374529787
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374529789
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 1.5 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #387,916 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is hoped that she will be recognized for what she is: one of the finest writers of fiction in any language." --John Ashbery, The New York Times Book Review

"For years, I've heard about Jane Bowles, what a good writer she is, and now it is no longer necessary to wonder about her." --Anatole Broyard

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Portugese --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 4, 1999
Format: Paperback
While the entire collection is notable, I have to say that "Two Serious Women" seems to me to be the real masterpiece here. I read it ten or so years ago for the first time and liked it but found it rather dark. I re-read it a few years ago and liked it much more than I had the first time, finding it hillarious, albeit darkly. I was happily surprised all over again by the unpredictable behavior of the characters. Unlike many novels, this one is almost immediately engaging, with its portrait of the young Christina Goering's religion-obsessed childhood games. Jane Bowles is often lumped in with her husband; but her writing, though less voluminous, is more unique, more inventive. This is writing well worth repeated reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Jane Bowles' prose is strange and beautiful. It's never quite clear why her characters act the way they do, but they leave such haunting impressions that her novel and stories beg to be read a second time. My Sister's Hand in Mine is a great companion piece to Paul Bowles' The Sheltering Sky, which shares the split cold/emotional nature of Jane's work, and also themes of Americans abroad. Jane's novel Two Serious Ladies, which opens this collection, is a stunner. A wonderful writer; I wish she'd written more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Poogy on February 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
I really wish I could jump on the bandwagon of singing Jane Bowles' praises, but I haven't been able to understand what all the fuss is about. "The greatest novelist of the century?" Whoa--this is not on my list of the top 100. I've long been a great fan of Paul Bowles--surely one of the most intense and talented writers of the last century--and Jane sounded interesting in all the reviews, but after reading both Camp Cataract and Two Serious Ladies, and several other of the stories, I was disappointed. Almost all are about odd, neurotic women with overpowering urges to escape their dreary lives of conformity, and/or who relate to other odd, neurotic women in strangely belligerant ways. All of the male characters are pathetic and superfluous, or are at least treated that way by women who have no use for them.

I found it frustrating that all of the characters constantly make decisions, or say things, that seem without any apparent motivation. It's very difficult to get a read on why any of the characters do what they do. A woman who seems to have been content all her life to live a staid, "respectable" existence decides she's going to be a prostitute. Why? Then she decides not to. Why? There's no explanation, in either inner monologue, dialogue, background plot, or anything--the characters just do things that seem...strange. I like strange--Paul Bowles, for example, can be very strange, and it's fascinating--but Jane seems to keep writing, I assume, about herself, in the obsessive manner of the narcissist who can't stop thinking and talking and writing about her personal concerns as though they were universal. And maybe they are universal, among lesbians, I can't say.

Paul Bowles is timeless--his stories could have been written yesterday.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
Incredible book. Jane Bowles has the unique characteristic of amusing and depressing us at the same time. Two serious ladies and her short fiction(Camp Catarat and Plain Pleasures are masterpieces) are unique. Her play is funny but she is not as good as in her narrative.
What you will find in this book is a complete diferent way of understanding live, you will encounter an original brain that expreses itself with the most personal sentences you will ever read. Jane stands alone in the whole literary tradition. Surrounded by her terror, obsessions and complete understanding of human heart what Bowles achieves is the perfect expression of human essence.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Megan A. Burns on April 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
The only bad thing about this collection is that Bowles' collected work is so limited. The writing is experimental, intriguing and engaging. Her language is so fresh. The different genres show her reach as an artist. You only wish that she had been more prolific. She will be read for years to come.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
'My Sister's Hand In Mine: The Collected Works Of Jane Bowles' (1970) offers readers the rewarding opportunity of entering the strange but oddly homey world of its author. The volume contains Bowles' only novel, 'Two Serious Ladies,' her single work for the theater, 'In the Summer House,' and thirteen short stories and unfinished pieces. The book's real strengths are 'Two Serious Ladies' and the long story 'Camp Cataract,' works that compliment one another and successfully define the unique landscape of Bowles' vision.

Married to the more famous novelist, composer, and expatriate Paul Bowles, Jane was a bisexual woman with strong lesbian leanings. Though her liveliness and wit were widely celebrated by other artists of the period, most of whom were also ardent admirers of her talent, Bowles' life was compromised by severe anxiety, and her final years were marked by illness and tragedy.

The individualistic Bowles was probably an introvert in Jung's original definition of term, as her character's fears largely revolve around the idea of "passage into the outside world," those stages of life beyond childhood, adolescence, home, and the nuclear family. But while confronting the outer world is a unpleasant experience for most of Bowles' characters, their family life, far from a paradise, is typically presented as a sentimentally-idealized, but nonetheless claustrophobic, circle in hell. Achieving and maintaining a state of grace was also an important matter for the author, though her unsettlingly tragicomic approach to both themes has historically kept her work from being widely accepted as mainstream American literature.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?