Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

70 of 72 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2013
Full disclosure: I am the author's daughter.

Elisa Medhus is a physician and mother of 5, who tragically lost her son to bipolar disorder/suicide in 2009. I found this book really, really interesting because she comes from a scientific background and atheist parents, and chronicles her journey to discovering spirituality and the afterlife (or "heaven", whatever you prefer to call it) in a very realistic, approachable way. She began communicating with her son via mediums, and decided to chronicle those experiences on a blog, which she called simply Channeling Erik. I found Erik's voice (through the psychic) extremely amusing, with colorful language (unedited, a feature I appreciated, and very true to how he was in real life) and together I feel they truly take on the heavy subjects (life after death, the meaning of life, God, reincarnation, etc) with a refreshingly down to earth approach. Very believable, and truly makes you wonder. 5 star read. Highly recommend!
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2013
I am reading Dr. Medhus' book about her son Erik. I have been following the blog for quite some time now. It always has such interesting information for those searching to know more about life after we make our transition out of this reality. The book is presenting more information than has been delivered in the blogs. I feel this book will help those in grief because of the loss of loved ones. I love the stories and the relevancy to my life.
66 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
on October 7, 2013
I began following Elisa's blog a year ago, after losing my own son in a car accident. There, I found my answers to questions like: Why my son? Why was he taken so young? Is he OK? It helped me deal with my grief, and move forward in realizing my own life purpose. This book takes important information from the blog and distills it down to the pure essence, in a well-thought-out and logical manner.

Erik, Jamie and Elisa make a potent team. Erik has the gift of explaining complex topics in a clear (and irreverent) way that I can understand and relate to. Jamie is a pure and joy-filled channel that allows Erik's words to flow unhindered and unfiltered. And Elisa brings her probing questions, logic, and deep mothers love.

If you have ever wondered about what happens after death, buy this book. The universe is SO much bigger than we ever imagined.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
117 of 133 people found the following review helpful
on May 16, 2014
First let me say, in November 2007 my 26 year old Son lost his life at the hands of a 17 year old killer. So, I am always interested in books that give a look at what is called the "Afterlife". My wife saw this book on the Goodreads web site and bought for me thinking it might provide hope and comfort.

One problem with reading a book on this topic, and then reviewing it, is the baggage we bring with us when we decide to read it. Most people have a set of beliefs that they hold or a religious bias that they bring with them when they read a book such as this. In general they are looking to validate the beliefs they already hold. In honesty I am no different in this respect. In that same vein a person who writes a book such as this they bring their beliefs and bias to the written page.

It appears to me that Dr. Medhus has brought her own beliefs into the writing of this book. Dr. Medhus openly admits that she and her siblings were raised in an Atheist household and I think it shows in the writing of this book.

What I find in this book is an aggrieved mother that is trying come to grips with the loss of her 20 year Son Erik, to suicide. With the loss of her Son she now has to come to grips with her Atheistic belief which is that there is no "Afterlife". In her desperation to overcome a lifetime of Atheistic beliefs she has sought out a way to create a "Heaven" based on science or secularism rather than the spiritualism taught be most religions. In fact the author seems to do everything she can in order to avoid mentioning the "God" that many religions teach. She talks of a source of energy or light, a scientific power. And yet, in order to reach her Son she reaches out to mediums and psychics, although she chooses to call these people Spiritual Guides or Interpreters. She deludes herself into believing these title give more scientific credence to the channeling of Erik.

We do learn that as Erik got older he developed Bi-polar disorder and also suffered with Tourette's Syndrome. As he got older Erik withdrew from family and friends and eventually took his own life.

We learn that through these guides Dr. Medhus is able to talk with her Son who has now become a higher evolved being. The author does warn us that Erik, who had a propensity to swear before his death continues to swear in the afterlife in part due to his Tourette's. In Tourette's syndrome the sufferer has emotional outbursts often of a profane nature, using profanity to express this emotion. Two points. One: In portraying her Son swearing she does not express the words in a way that a Tourette's sufferer would express them. Two: Her Son was now a higher evolved being. I have to ask why a higher evolved being would constantly have to resort to vulgar language. What I find here is a foul mouthed 20 year old that wasn't very evolved at all, and I might add that his Mother, the Author was not above some vulgarity of her own. She sure knows how to take God's name in vein.

She talks of learn about the light that most people with "Near Death Experiences" see. I find it interesting that the author reduces it to a scientific phenomenon. Her explanation is that it is the lack of oxygen that causes the light and not some spiritual manifestation. Correct me if I'm wrong but wouldn't a Dr. know that a lack of oxygen would destroy the optic nerve and cause blackness and not light?

Dr. Medhus talks quite often to her Son over the period of this book, asking many questions about what the "Afterlife" is like. We learn that spirits can create homes and pizza and big screen TVs, although I have to wonder why a higher spiritual being without a flesh and blood body would need these things. We learn that Erik has lived many lives and will live many more lives. That as we live progressive lives we overcome the problems we have had in the past. What horrible problems did Erik have in the past that led to suicide in this life?

She asks about human consciousness and states, "Erik dove into some of the into the science behind the nature of consciousness , which went a long way to smoothing the ruffled feathers of the scientist in me". Question: Why does the afterlife have to be based on ANY science? Just because the as a Dr. the author has a scientific background? Excuse me but "Heaven" doesn't need to have a scientific bases in order to exist.

One of the other problems that disturbs me is that as Dr. Medhus talks to her Son she constantly feeds him the answers or Jamie, one of the Spiritual Guides, states that Erik is quite often searching for answers. Does a self proclaimed higher spiritual being need to be fed answers or even need to struggle to find answers?

Also we learn that Erik the spirit can become absorbed into the "Spirit God". That we came literally become God if we choose.

A little side note. As I stood with my cousin, my clergy and a funeral home representative the man from the funeral home asked if we had a religious affiliation and a belief in an afterlife. When asking why he wanted to know he stated that in all the years he had been in the business the single group that had the greatest difficulty facing the finality of death were self proclaimed Atheists. When faced with a lifetime of belief many could not handle the fact that a loved one was now lost to them forever. Now they were hoping that this long held belief in no life after death was false.

What I find in this book is a Mother filled with guilt and a desperation that her long held beliefs or not true. So she turns to the only source that can help her and that is "Spiritual Guides" because "Mediums" are not "Scientific" enough. When her Son, or the guide? can't give her the answer she wants, she creates a scientific answer to her problem and even finds a way to keep "God" out of the equation.

As for the two "Spiritual Guides", I found them very disturbing. Especially Jamie. I found them both lacking in any credibility. And all the giggling was very troubling.

This book gave me no comfort at all, and I had to stop reading it for awhile. But I felt that I needed to finish it in order to give my honest opinion. Should everyone choose to not read this book? I will not suggest that to be the case as it has received many more positive reviews so far than 3,2 or 1 star reviews. I cannot tell a grieving parent what they should read in order to bring them comfort. If this book helps anyone then that is wonderful, it just didn't help me. I would only caution that a potential reader check out the book first, before spending $16 at a book store.
And to those of you that have attacked lower starred reviews, we have the right to our opinions and it doesn't stop you from reading and getting enjoyment out of this book, but it might help someone else from undo pain of reading a book that disturbs more than it helps.

Addendum: One thing I've now experienced with this review is the whole helpful, not helpful issue here on Amazon reviews. I've made an honest effort to review this book objectively based on my own experiences. I've been very open about that. My own son was murdered seven years ago and me and my wife struggle every day. This book brought me no comfort or feelings of hope. That is my experience. But I have found that some readers of this book are giving my review a not helpful rating, not because my review is or isn't helpful, but because they liked the book and want to express their negative feelings towards someone who didn't like the book. I've been very specific as to why this review earned a two star rating from me. This review will either make a person want to read the book or not read the book, that is called being helpful. Giving any review a "Not Helpful" vote simple because you liked the book and disagree with someone who doesn't like the book is an inappropriate use of this forum.
3838 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2013
As a person that has studied metaphysics for the last twenty or so years, I found this book to be the best account of life after death that I have ever read - and I've read a lot! I been around many people who experienced NDEs, been to numerous lectures, and I have given lectures and classes regarding life after death. I highly recommend everyone read this. It will enlighten you, make you laugh, you may even shed a tear or two as I did - it's a must read. My hats off to Eriks' mom. Thank you for bringing his story and yours to the world!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2013
I lost my 9 year old daughter 33 years ago. Since then I have read many books about the afterlife and life purpose. Parents of special needs children are always searching for the "why" of such an existence. Even though Dr. Medhus has a totally different situation than mine, I found we shared the same basic emotions. Why did this happen to my child?

I found Erik's descriptions of the afterlife very intriguing. I especially enjoyed some of the more heady discussions of quantum physics principles. Very thought provoking.

I highly recommend this book to anyone open to new ideas, or to anyone seeking some reassurance that love lives on after we cross over.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2013
This is a story of unconditional love. Dr.Medhus courageously shares her journey of having to make sense of why bad things happen to good people. She rebuilds her life by helping others. There are two stories here, Dr. Medhus' journey to her new normal and the wonder of Erik's insight into human suffering. I read it with wonder and gratitude.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on October 19, 2013
To anyone who has lost a child, or a loved one, this book will open your eyes and fill your heart with joy. Elisa's journey to reconnect with Erik has also become mine. Reading the book, getting to know Erik through his words has given me faith, and given me my son back. If you have ever wondered what happens after we pass..this is a great place to begin looking. A must read in my book...and I have read thousands.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2013
If you are looking for a great read, one that will touch your Heart and feed your Soul, buy this book! Believer or non-believer, you won't regret it!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
27 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on October 25, 2013
Let me start by saying that after reading extensively in the field, I am not a skeptic of the idea that consciousness exists independently of the body, that the afterlife has many dimensions or vibrational fields, or that we are all part of the Source. Quite the contrary. However, it's difficult not to be skeptical about many of the specifics presented here - for example, that a highly advanced soul (as Erik is set out to be) would bother to materialize a flat screen TV in heaven. (When his mother asks what he watches on it, his answer is "Anything I want!" And she somehow doesn't probe further.) And that's quite typical of their exchanges, minus the profanity (Erik can't seem to answer yes or no sometimes without a forceful expletive to back it up) and the giggling and the endless compliments along the line of "My Son the Brilliant Advanced Soul." The medium gets involved, too. I quote an exchange from Page 255 after one of Erik's explanations: Jamie (the medium) to Erik: "Aw! That's so - High five on that one, Erik!" Me (the author): "Yay! That was totally awesome, Erik! I especially like it when you say 'hence.' That's just so cute." Erik: "Aw, shucks."

I expect that for many people this is exactly what gives the book its charm. And I get it that this is a bereaved mother, delighted to have contact with her deceased son, anxious to record every word and (to her) adorable mannerism. But too often it just seems like ego of the sort that overshares on Facebook, and that is really odd if both mother and son are such advanced souls as we are told that they are. Which brings me back to - why would such an advanced soul need to watch television when he has the universe at his disposal, in the blink of an eye (or shimmer of a ball of energy)? What of his past lives that he needs to be healed from - wouldn't a mother ask? She does ask if they have computers in heaven "yet" - and this after pages and pages of being told he can materialize anything he wants, learn anything he wants... ultimately, as she discovers later, have one-on-ones with the Source Itself.

I wanted to love this book, but I just couldn't, any more than I could be entirely convinced by it.
55 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.