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My Two-Year-Old Eats Octopus: Raising Children Who Love to Eat Everything Paperback – November 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Bull Publishing Company (November 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1933503173
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933503172
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,045,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nancy Tringali Piho works in public relations for a number of national food industry associations. She lives in Washington, DC.

Customer Reviews

I found it extremely inspirational and full of great concepts and ideas.
P. Tait
There are many things in here that I am already trying to incorporate in my own life, because I want my kids to love good food as much as I do.
Rebekah Jensen
The book has a lot of helpful information that will inspire parents to really think about the foods that they are serving their kids.
G. Nordlinger

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 102 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Davidson on November 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
In case the title doesn't seem self-congratulatory enough, wait until you read the introduction - paragraphs about what a perfect eater the author's 2-year-old was! (No offense to him, I'm sure a great kid.) Clearly they were unaware that their market is people who don't have it so easy - people who can't take their kid into a trendy Peruvian restaurant and eat ceviche and arrepas, while other diners raved what a great eater he is!

If you happen to be the parent of a child that is an adventurous eater, I think this book was designed for you, because the first six chapters are bragging tales about how well she and her husband have gotten her kids to eat everything. Also, children of chefs are less picky, because chefs CARE about food. Also, children in other countries have less picky eaters than our stupid country (e.g., Gerber South Korea has daikon root baby food!... Lebanese children eat hummus!!! ... Oh, the French!).

Why are your kids picky eaters? Because a) your kids eat way too much fast food, b) your kids watch too much commercial television (4 hours a day!), c) you're a picky eater, and d) you don't like to cook.

Well, my kids rarely eat fast food, don't watch commercial television, I am not a picky eater, and my wife (a FOOD Writer!) and I cook. Extensively. And my kids are picky eaters. And we do lots of the things she says, like have regular meal times, and having them help us cook.

I will be fair - by Chapter 7, the author does reveal a) she had a hard time feeding her kids vegetables once! b) kids don't like foods that are mixed up (and there are even physiological reasons for this), and c) kids are averse to eating vegetables (again, physiologically!).
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Marian Blazes on April 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
I found this book a fascinating read, even though my children are older and mostly past the picky eater phase. What was so interesting was the author's exploration of some of the societal (and marketing) changes that affect all of our eating habits - adults and children alike. Children used to have fewer choices, and they ate pretty much what their parents did. The author notes how nowadays there are a slew of food products marketed just to children, and how many of these products don't even taste like real food - many have fantastical flavors and neon colors, for example. (It was surprising to learn what the author discovered when she had her friends and family taste test the baby and toddler food products). She concludes that many parents just accept the notion that children eat their own special foods, completely separate from what adults eat.
I strongly agree with the author that, just like pretty much everything else in life, good eating habits and good nutrition need to be taught to kids. It takes time, and you may not see results right away, but letting your own eating habits serve as an example will go far in the long run.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lorene F. Steves on April 25, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition
Author Nancy Piho makes so many great points that I as a mom, grandmother, and cooking teacher, can expand on. Not that my two-year-old ever said "more octopus," but trips to a Farmers Market that offers tastings of fresh local ingredients sold one of my grandchildren on strawberries, and another on broccoli. Keeping the 'green' world in mind these days could be one of the Piho 'plays' in her book --- growing and eating this food could make the world better for 'you' to live in. This fits in with sustainable seafood and Seafood Watch at the Monterey Museum or showing children how to read the nutritional labeling.

It's the real life situations described that win you over and make you laugh. Until you read this book you may have thought you were the only one who had a child that would only eat plain pasta and chocolate anything. It's fun to be proven wrong.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By S. Nicholas on February 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book is overrated. It does not discuss any sensory concerns a child might have, nor does it discuss normal (proven) developmental milestones that occur with children. The author whines quite a bit about 'american' culture and is critical about typical american feeding styles offering few alternatives, except to raise your child with a chef in the home - with a food budget to match.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A. Much on January 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book could have been one page long. I am pregnant and hope to raise a non-picky eater, and there weren't any practical tips in the book. It's basically a narrative about her own child, which somehow makes her qualified to write an entire book.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Me on December 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
I love to cook and we don't keep "junk" in our home. He refuses most everyting, even french fries!!! He'll take a couple licks of ice cream and than say he is done. So no he isn't filling up on empty calories. Surfice it to say this book helped me non-what-so-ever. And I have never babied his taste buds or cooked special for him {less or no salt though!} He is served a variety of tasty dishes but won't eat any of it. If you have high hopes of this book solving your child's eating issues borrow instead of buying it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Thorn on January 16, 2014
Format: Paperback
I read this when my daughter was about a year old. She is now three and is open to trying a lot of different foods. I suspect that the people who reviewed this book negatively aren't really buying one of the premises of the book - that you need to stop counting how many bites they are taking, and simply expose them to a lot of different foods. After reading this book, my approach was to give my daughter a lunch that I knew she would like (so I could feel confident she wasn't actually starving to death) - if she ate it all, great, if she didn't, it means she wasn't hungry and who cares, then to expose her to a wide variety of foods at dinner, when I found she was generally less hungry anyway. This book taught me that you can't put a food on their plate once and decide they are picky if they don't eat it. Keep putting it on their plate - after being exposed to it several times, it may become their favorite food! Also, this book helped me not to make assumptions about what my child would/wouldn't eat. I remember one time I made a dinner of salmon, quinoa, and swiss chard. I didn't think my daughter would touch any of it, but I served it to her anyway and she ate the whole thing. Other times, the opposite happens - I give her peanut butter and jelly and she won't touch it. She probably just wasn't hungry that day!

The big takeway I get from this book is the definition of a "good eater." A good eater should not be defined by how many bites they put into their mouths. As long as they are growing fine and their pediatrician is not raising alarm bells, RELAX. A good eater is defined by an openness to trying new things. My daughter is willing to try a bite of anything and is open to liking or disliking it, and to changing her mind over time.
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My Two-Year-Old Eats Octopus: Raising Children Who Love to Eat Everything
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