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.NET Patterns: Architecture, Design, and Process Paperback – August 28, 2003

ISBN-13: 007-6092020455 ISBN-10: 0321130022 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (August 28, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321130022
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321130020
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,482,786 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The complete software developer's guide to working in .NET environments

Praise for .NET Patterns:

"Was both insightful and comprehensive. It's great to see these patterns presented within the context of many architectural dilemmas facing the vastly interconnected enterprise. Web service architects are sure to see enormous value in this text."

—Ed Draper, Microsoft

Patterns have proven to be practical tools for the programmer who knows how to use them. In .NET Patterns, distributed computing and .NET expert Christian Thilmany presents both an introduction to patterns for programmers working in the .NET environment and a library of patterns unique to the .NET platform.

Part of John Vlissides' critically acclaimed Addison-Wesley Software Patterns Series, .NET Patterns extends the proven concept of design patterns into the arena of .NET design and development. Now, .NET developers can depend on patterns to provide solutions to recurring problems in software design.

In addition to covering both lower and higher level programming with patterns, this book also includes helpful primers on XML and web services, as well as thorough coverage of debugging, exceptions, error handling, and architecture.

Whether you're working in .NET environments or transitioning to .NET environments, you'll find .NET Patterns a comprehensive resource for software solutions.

About the Author

CHRISTIAN THILMANY is .NET Solutions Architect for Microsoft Corporation. He has more than 13 years of experience consulting for a variety of Fortune 500 firms in fields such as distributed application architectures for Internet, Intranet, and client/server development. Christian is also a frequent contributor to Java Developer's Journal Magazine, Microsoft Interactive Developer (MIND), and MSDN Magazine.


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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By mattx on August 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
THE GOOD: The patterns in this book are very good. Useful, informative, and well explained. The author really seems to know his stuff and convey it well.
THE NO SO GOOD: Too much time is spent inadequately introducing concepts that the reader should just be sent to another book for. Ironically the author realizes this and says so before he goes forward with his useless introductory material.
THE BAD: It appears that I am the first person to read this book since it was completed. It is probably among the five most poorly edited software books I have ever seen. Simply read the fist 10 pages and you will find at least one non-sensical sentence per page. Sometimes this is as simple as an extra verb or the accidental use of "it" when the author meant "is". Other times the entire thought becomes indecipherable in the middle of a line.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mijobe on January 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is the worst book I've ever read on programming, period. I've never taken the time to write a review before but this book is so horrible that it motivated me to look it up here and write it a poor review. I'm returning my copy. Simply put, there is very, very little useful content. Between the simple grammatical errors and the code errors I just couldn't bring myself to finish it. I read until page 59 telling myself it has to get better but it just didn't. Microsoft puts out a free book that you can download in PDF format named "Enterprise Solution Patterns using Microsoft .NET", save your money and read that. I cannot express how disappointed I was with this book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 5, 2004
Format: Paperback
As a person familiar with the original Go4 patterns. I think this book is definitely sub-standard. It definitely DOES NOT fit into the category of Great Pattern books (e.g Design Patterns book by Gamma et al). The Author obviously has experience in the technology and comes up with a handful of good pattern ideas however the code supporting some of these Ideas (e.g in the so called Poly Pattern)and through out the book raises more questions than answers. The conceptual explanations of what the patterns are supposed to achieve are ok to some extent but the authors coding style leaves much to be desired. The implementation of the hungarian notation in an object oriented context and his none conformance to standard OO coding standards (not even the standards laid down by microsoft the company he works for) makes poor reading for what could have been an excellent book. A simple review of the code in the book by FXcop ([...]) would support this notion. The editing of the book is also very poor. Often as you read through you wonder where a pattern begins or ends
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hein on September 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a great resource for .NET Framework developers, with patterns that are very useful and nicely solve many common .NET Framework design challenges. In particular, I like the composite "Poly Model" pattern for a flexible data access layer.
Unfortunetely, the code is full of typos and just plain errors. It is frustrating to see a piece of code querying for the number of rows effected by a query, when the count was already returned to another variable just one line above! Terrible editing has taken much pleasure out of discovering the interesting and effective patterns.
I am most disappointed in the fact that there is no downloadable code samples that show the sample implementations in their entirety, and working (which would at least force the author to make sure the code can compile).
The only reason why I am giving 3 stars is because the patterns presented are excellent overall, but this book is like reading a first draft.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By 4Pugs on January 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
I gave the book one star simply because no lower option is available.
I had high hopes this book would provide practical data tier patterns for a current project. However, the "polymodel" discussed in the book strikes me as so specialized (pertinent to atomic transaction based system - i.e. credit card authorization) that it is useless in most other areas. Even with that in mind, the concept of only storing your data as xml in a relational database is incredibly inefficient for my needs (such as data warehousing). The other point that struck me is he preceds all stored procedure names with sp_. I'm not a DBA but even I know this is a no no in Sql Server 2k. It actually slows calls to the stored procedures when you precede them with sp_.
I've not written a review before but based on the poor quality of what I've seen, I hope to save someone else the anguish.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By John W. Conwell on August 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have to disagree with most of the reviews here. I think the author has some good design pattern idea's. It seems like if a pattern book doesn't rehash the GOF's book for the 654654th time, its not a good pattern book. The author had some good ideas, and while most of the patterns are fairly focused to a specific problem and are not totally generic, it doesn't mean its not a good pattern idea. It's just a domain specific pattern. I think the author should have clearly specified that, but didn't and that was a mistake. He billed the book as a general user pattern book. So I game him 4 stars on that.

But, in my job I'm very focused on code performance, so I knocked him back down two stars because these patterns are pretty much useless if you are designing anything that needs high performance capabilities, like web services. Most of the book is focused on patterns that he applies to web services, but he uses stuff like XML, DataSets and Reflection to create his abstraction layers. These three things are the 3 WORST performing features of .Net. If you are creating anything that needs to run `fast', you should stay away from all three of these. The pattern that killed me was his abstract packet pattern, which used DataSets or strongly typed DataSets to pass a list of parms between functions. He even hyped this pattern up based on performance reasons. I'd have to bet the guy never ran his code through a profiler to see what the performance implications of this pattern were. He made a lot of performance claims, but never showed the numbers to prove them, which is a dangerous thing because many developers will take what an author says as word, and not test the claim for themselves.

So I think he had good ideas, but very poor choices with his implementation technology.
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