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NO MORE MR. NICE GUY Hardcover – 1990

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Hardcover, 1990
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich c; First Edition edition (1990)
  • ASIN: B0019SN504
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dunn Neugebauer on February 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Dick Williams writes the way he managed - honest, to the point, and in your face. 'No More Mr. Nice Guy' reads with the passion that he felt for the game and leaves you with a bit of sadness at, not only the way the game has changed, by how the Dick Williams's of the world have gone unappreciated. He took three different teams to the World Series, he perhaps saved the Padres from being sold, he took the Expos (yes the Expos) to winning seasons, he delivered nothing short of a miracle in 1967 with the Red Sox and he even pushed a couple of teams to winning even the players themselves weren't sure if that's what they wanted. This isn't to mention two rings with the Oakland A's.

It's sad the Hall of Fame has overlooked this guy. Not only is it a case of what more do you have to do, in the case of Dick Williams, it's what more could he have possibly done?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Chee on September 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I have been a fan of Dick Willams and the San Deigo Padres for a long time.This book has been a favorite of mine! I have always admired Dick Williams for his no nonsense approach and turning losing teams into winners. This book is entertaining and provides the inside thoughts and soul searching straight from the heart.Thank you to Dick and congratulations on the hall of fame.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Baskin on November 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit that when I first logged on to write this review, I was tempted to give "No More Mr. Nice Guy" a 4 rating, mostly because Dick Williams really DOESN'T come across as a very nice guy. But you know what? The more I thought about it, the more it became apparent that was the exact reason this book has EARNED a five-star rating.

Whatever words people use to describe Williams, "nice" is rarely one of them. He is old-school all the way, a very direct and blunt individual who tells you what he thinks and damn the consequences. However, even if you disagree with some of what he says, you have to respect his honesty. There is absolutely no BS about the guy.

Williams could have taken the easy way out and told a rosy story about what a misunderstood guy he really is and how loveable he really is, but he doesn't. He knows he has a bad temper and a short fuse with people (including his long-suffering wife, Norma), and freely admits it. He speaks his mind and spares nobody with his criticisms. He is not a politician, and if there are things he's bitter about, he doesn't hide them. He is who he is.

I'd strongly recommend this for baseball fans who want to read an unvarnished autobiography of a Hall of Famer who has done it his way all his life and is unapologetic about that. A great read about a great manager.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jose Rodriguez on June 24, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dick Williams never had a problem that he couldn't blame on somebody else. Owners, players, writers, everybody had something to do with his failures as a manager. Other than that, the book is worth reading because he tells his version unadorned, without politeness and right to the point. Nowadays, baseball books are boring, because they want to tell us some stories, but without hurting the feelings of those involved, so the story is always incomplete, just for the sake of avoiding controversy. He has a good point about baseball owners. They are people who usually make money out of another business, then they purchase a team and they strongly believe that that solely fact make them baseball saviors or baseball gurus. And there's something you can't take off Williams: wherever he arrived, he turned a loser in a winner and that's remarkable.
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