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Naked World
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on September 23, 2006
I got Naked States years ago so I decided to get this one as well. I'm not sure which I like best (it's been so long since I watched "States") but this one was interesting. The video work was generally well done, Tunick might even give a better impression of himself this time around and sometimes it even looked 'arty'.

I don't remember much about the gallery extra but the New York/Grand Central bit had a somewhat disorganized look to it (maybe all photo shoots are like that), and appeared to consist entirely of hundreds of women. The resulting pictures didn't look like art to me, or pornography, but the women seemed to really enjoy themselves- not much sign of nervousness.

In all of the countries shown,in some of which only a few people posed, it seemed to be a common thread that people would be a little nervous but also excited and enjoying themselves- that might be the best part of this program (the joy of the occaision).

Some pictures come out more artful than others but this is a good video for what art does come through and for the look on people's faces as they nervously have a good time. I don't regret getting it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on January 12, 2008
Watch Naked States first and then this DVD to see how far Mr. Tunick has come. He is now traveling the world rather than the US in a van.
Photos are very tastefully done and not pornographic.
His group shots are my favorite.
I purchased Naked States and Naked World after participating in one of his photo shoots in Miami Beach, FL in Oct. 2007. It's a weird feeling standing around with a bunch of naked strangers waiting for a cloud to move so he can get his shot.
I learned that no matter what your background, education, skin color, salary or what kind of car you drive at the end of the day we are all the same.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 21, 2008
I like pictures of naked women, but I like real people, w/o thousands of dollars of surgery, airbrushing, dumb poses, etc. So I found this doc about Spencer Tunick's project to be just right. And as another reviewer said, the people posing, whether singly or by the thousands, all seemed to have had a real 'moment' at the shoots, which seemed to be 'happenings' too. They always cheer happily afterwards, proud to have dared to be free, however briefly. And I so liked the sequence w/ the Russian Museum Director who had her doubts, but was willing to do it 'for art'. I applaude her, and the artist, and all his models. Naked in the streets looks like good clean fun to me!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 21, 2013
As a photographer I love the still photography and images of the photographer in the planning and the execution of the shot. This movie does all of this an more. This is a well put together film...the photos move..even the music moves in it...this is just an A+ film!
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The documentary begins with a brief look at Mr. Tunick on a sidewalk in 1993 photographing four nude models. Then there is footage of him with a larger nude group
in the street in 1999 being arrested in New York City.

Disgusted with being treated like a criminal in New York, Spencer conceives a Nudes Adrift project whereby he'll photograph on seven continents and remove himself
from the USA for a time. It's a one-year project encompassing both single portrait work and the larger group installations he's now primarily identified with.

His first stop is Montreal. There he obtains a large crowd of 2100 people to pose at an outdoor installation. This is the first time he's worked with over 1000 people. He's grateful for being in Canada because he is treated as an artist which is a far cry
from how he'd been treated in New York with an arrest for basically doing the same type of public venue. One can imagine his feeling of vindication being outside
of the USA at this moment.

Apparently, the film is not strictly in chronological order. The next stop shown is London and in the
commentary track it is revealed this is two weeks after 9/11/2001. In the film after England they are in Ireland and in commentary Spencer states he was photographing a woman there when 9/11 happened. Not sure why this juxtaposition was done in the film. And
Mr. Tunick says in the commentary track that he visited about thirty countries. The documentary
shows him in about ten countries. The director/producer Arlene Donnelly Nelson says she shot about 250 hours of film. So one can see how much has been edited for this 76 minute film.

Compared to a previous documentary, Naked States, Mr. Tunick seems to be more relaxed here. There is still, of course, stress in traveling and organizing each photography session but he seems more assured of his success. Though toward the end of the film while in
Sao Paolo for the bienal he is heard wondering aloud if he'll make a profit after his journey. But in the commentary portion (done later) he states that his work is selling so he can afford to pay his rent. In Sao Paola his art dealer tries to reassure him by saying it's the prestige of the venue, not the profit.

Projects like Nudes Adrift are not easy to do successfully. This documentary gives a condensed view of the process. We watch Spencer and his now wife Krissy Bowler moving around the world pursuing a vision. Not every photography session is satisfying
with the end results. In the commentary track Mr. Tunick laments at times about how the public sees his failures with ideas that later don't seem to be so great great as originally conceived. He mentions an artist needing to keep an air of mystery around his work and how a documentary crew following him can be too revealing at times. But a documentary film can also show the artist things that he'd otherwise miss such as some of the participants in the large installations speaking of their feelings having been a part of the work. Spencer concedes there is good and bad derived from the documentary film process.

If someone is merely wanting to see unclothed people then this film has that. But I think any serious artist would be interested in seeing another artist at work and hear his thoughts about his work. There is an exchange on the ship in Antarctica between Spencer and his friend Chris that is informative. After Spencer has
photographed Krissy on land amid penguins and ice he is
confronted by Chris asking, "How can you make it look different if it's just in front of a bunch of penguins? I mean, anyone can take that shot." Spencer answers: "You just have to take what you get. That's what makes a difference - the fact that I'm taking it and I have a specific project and there's probably a hundred people that could take a better photograph than me, but they're not doing my specific project. It's about a documentation of an event. I'm not trying to create the world's best nude in Antarctica photograph that has never been tried before." Chris
persists stating, "But if it's going to hang in a gallery you want it to look to have some sort of artistic value." Spencer replies, "They don't have to be good photographs." Chris asks, "Would you want them to be good?" And Spencer says, "Sometimes when you're taking good photographs, it's not really good. I want them to be good as a whole."

The dvd special features include a sparse still photograph gallery of ten images, and a seven minute film of a 2003 group installation in Grand Central Station. The participants are all female and there is
barely any audio except for the crowd noises as they arrive, pose, and depart.

This documentary shows yet another stage in Mr. Tunick's rise in the art world. The events shown are
now at least eleven years old. As he said after the harassment in New York - he wanted to move beyond a feeling of criminal or street urchin of art. Leaving the USA for a time seemed inevitable after five arrests. But the hostility he experienced in New York is not only an American occurrence. In Paris, for example, he did not receive a very warm welcome. It's sad at times but also illuminating to witness the reactions people have toward the human body all across the world. It's naturally obvious that everybody has a body. But so many people have difficulty coming to terms with that basic fact. This film does not explore
the complexity of reactions, but just in showing so many various types of bodies and shades and skin textures it might help to make people who have negative connotations about nudity begin to realize that all of us are basically the same.

Without the commentary track I would have rated this dvd less than five stars. The film feels short and a bit rushed. After all, the project involved a trip around the world. Ms. Nelson stated she had 250 hours of film to edit. The length of the final film with end credits is around 76:30 minutes. The commentary with her and Mr. Tunick fills in some holes that are
apparent in the documentary itself. I admire Mr. Tunick for following a vision and having the persistence to see things to a conclusion. It is good to hear him speak about his work both in the film and on the commentary track. I think that some of the work he's done that he's dismissive of now will perhaps gain more value in his eyes as he gets older and the work has receded even further into the past. This film captures him in his thirties imbued with confidence. He has a lot of people helping him. He could never have done all of this totally alone. As the
installations grew in size it is evident how he needed others to assist him in all of the variables involved. This film shows some of that support network. He appears grateful for everyone's assistance (although he is a bit miffed with the organizers for the Cuttysark installation). It is his name people will remember and although he's described by some as egotistical he does not come across here as such. But it does require a strong ego to become a successful artist. He states he becomes depressed when he's personally turned down by someone he has approached
asking them to pose. That is a clear indication of the sensitivity innate to most artists. He's not trying to
make them look bad or to demean them in any way by asking them to be a part of his work. And he takes their rejection to heart. There is a brief scene in Paris where he approaches two women at an outdoor cafe and they dismiss him. On camera he says they are rude or wonders if perhaps he is rude for trying to ask. He says he thinks they consider him "a loser." This one
scene encapsulates what many artists endure daily. Artists constantly face rejection on various levels.

Arlene Donnelly Nelson does a superb job capturing the events and working with the lighting she had. She and
Spencer Tunick work well together as a team. And, as I said, their commentary track is informative and much appreciated.

Jack Wegener
Savannah, GA
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 15, 2011
Like Mr. Tunick's other movie, Naked States, the sight of all those naked people in still, prostrate form struck me as weird, while my wife seemed to dig it. If you're into appreciating the nude body as an art form, this might be for you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2009
What can you say, a fascinating insight into getting anywhere from 1 to several hundred people to take off their clothes in public and pose. Unique results.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on January 10, 2007
If you like artistic nudity (mostly female), you will like this DVD.

It is worth what I paid.
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on May 27, 2011
A bunch of naked people laying around. Others I lent the disc to like it because of the installation art aspect of it, like Jeanne-Claude and Christo.
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on May 7, 2014
I liked to watch the nudist. It showed beautiful color. There showed lot nudists. It showed different places. It real show!
Thank you,
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