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The Name Of This Band Is Talking Heads (Expanded Version)

August 17, 2004 | Format: MP3

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 17, 2004
  • Release Date: August 17, 2004
  • Label: Rhino/Warner Bros.
  • Copyright: 2004 Sire Records Co. Manufactured and Marketed by Warner Strategic Marketing.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:36:28
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0012ELMQO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (106 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #59,724 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Seriously, surprisingly good detail and sound from a live album.
Jeffrey L. White
22 years after its vinyl release, one of the best live albums finally sees the light of day on CD.
Wayne Klein
It's great finally just to have the original tracks from this underappreciated live album on cd.
L. Peeples

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

90 of 96 people found the following review helpful By Clare Quilty on August 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is one of the greatest live rock albums ever released, which always made me wonder: why the hell wasn't it ever released on CD? Fortunately, that omission has been corrected and then some.

I, like most of the other reviewers here, bought this on cassette in the early 80s, and listened to it over and over and over on my Walkman. Once CDs became the dominant form, it seemed like this release was just going to fade away and I started cautiously eyeballing the extra-long cassette with its extra-thin tape to allow for 40 minutes per side. I found the double-LP set in a used record store, cued up an XLII and made a safety copy.

But now not only is that no longer necessary, but the CD is almost double the length of the original set. Great remastered barebones live Talking Heads from 77, 78, 79, 80 and some other rarities. It charts the early evolution of the band from Izod-wearing art schoolies to rhythmic world beat hipsters, dropping off just before the "Stop Making Sense" period began.

The new version sounds amazing (maybe I'm just used to my muddy old dubs) and it's almost box-set-like in its set list and packaging. It's a record to make your day.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Klein HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 24, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Took them long enough. 22 years after its vinyl release, one of the best live albums finally sees the light of day on CD. For years I had to listen myself to the CDR copy I made from vinyl (and that was tweaked by an engineer for CD). Late last year frustrated with not seeing this great album on CD, I wrote Rhino Handmade a email (I'm sure I'm not the only one)asking them to considering bulking up the original and re-releasing it on CD. Evidently my email and many others from other Talking Heads fans connected with someone as we finally have this terrific live document available on CD. TNOTBITH sounds better than ever and with 15 rare/previously unreleased tracks to boot!This was always my favorite Talking Heads album just behind "Remain in Light". Why? To be truly appreciated TH had to be seen and heard live. It's a pity there's no visual documentation of this version of the band available.

Charting the rise of the band from an early live recording in 1977 when the band was still a three piece to the legendary 10 piece featuring guitar great Adrian Belew. While "Stop Making Sense" gained more notice because it was after the band broke through (and because of Jonathan Demme's marvelous film), this album features some of the best shows/live versions of classic Talking Heads songs. The original album had 17 tracks (the cassette release had 18 including "Cities"). Rhino has added tracks recorded for radio shows, a rare Warner promo album and shows previously not represented on the vinyl or cassette versions. Now spread out over two CDs, there's a total of 33 tracks roughly doubling the original album.

The booklet basically reproduces the original packaging for the album with additional notes on the new material. There's no involved liner notes but that's OK as the music speaks for itself.
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31 of 36 people found the following review helpful By L. Colon on August 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Name of this Band is Talking Heads is one of my all-time favorite live records. All through high school & college it was an album I always returned to (on cassette) when I wanted something great & energetic to listen to in the studio or on the road.

But there was never a CD release. I have the vinyl for home & the tape for travel...but there was no CD version.

Now, after a long wait, Rhino has released this amazing expanded version of the classic 2 lp set. After buying my copy last night & listening to it during the olympics I had to write a review...because it's amazing. Even if they had just released the original version it would have been great, but this 2 cd set with 16 brand spanking new tracks (and three from the Promo live record) is unreal.

Even though the Heads never changed their songs much, the jammy live versions added here of Animals, Who Is It?, and Born Under Punches add so much to the original album that it makes purchasing this new release worth it and then some. If you've been craving some additional Heads stuff to add to your collection, this 2cd set is the fix...combined, the 33 traks make for a great listen, and show the gap left in music since the demise of this amazing band.

Thanks to Rhino for doing it best yet again!
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Tim Brough TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 25, 2004
Format: Audio CD
The Talking Heads may have evolved from the same petrii dish that fermented into the Ramones, Blondie, New York Dolls and a host of others, but they were as far musically from that crowd as a wall street exec stumbling through the Bowery. Far more into precision than noise, The Heads mixed their arty pop with quirky bubblegum sensibilities into songs like "New Feeling" and "Psycho Killer" long before Blondie took their pop sense and strode forth with "Heart Of Glass." While many may remember the denser and more rhythmic Talking Heads that began to emerge around "Fear Of Music," then ultimately immortalized on "Stop Making Sense," the first disc of this newly reconstructed double live set shows just how powerful the original four piece band was. Sounding solid and tentative both at the same time, the original 1977 material underscores the creative energy the Talking Heads were a part of during that relatively -- no pun intended -- heady late seventies NYC music period.

You can also hear them gaining confidence on the 1978 segment of the first disc and also how Byrne was beginning to assert his eccentricities (the early and less complex version of "Electricity"). Also readily in evidence is the band members' mastery of their instruments, including one of the great keyboardists of the era, Jerry Harrison.

Then you get the second disc, when the expanded version of the band was at their pre-"Stop Making Sense" best. The band stretched their arty chops into some white-funk and the Eno-derived sounds of "Remain In Light," and made some of the best music of the decade. They took on ace guitarist Adrian Belew (just before he helped Robert Fripp reform King Crimson) and Nona Hendryx for earthy background vocals.
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