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Nanoscale: Visualizing an Invisible World Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0262012836 ISBN-10: 0262012839 Edition: First Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; First Edition edition (February 13, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262012839
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262012836
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,687,589 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The twentieth century brought us two new views of the world we live in and two new levels of understanding -- the awesome views from space and the fascinating and astonishing images of the atomic world from the electron microscope. There are many popular presentations of the former but this volume is one of the first to give us a superbly illustrated glimpse of the micro-world that controls almost every aspect of our every day lives -- both useful and enjoyable!"--Lord Ronald Oxburgh, Chairman of The Shell Transport and Trading Company, and a member of the House of Lords, United Kingdom

(Ronald Oxburgh)

"Nanoscale helps us visual the invisible world of the ultra-small, combining both beautiful pictures with solid scientific explanation in a joyful union of art and science."--Alan Lightman, author of Einstein's Dreams and Ghost

(Alan Lightman)

"Every page of the Deffeyes's engaging texts and striking illustrations reveals surprises about the nanoarchitecture of our world and conveys how exciting and delightful science can be. Beautiful, amusing, and richly informative, this book deserves to be a classic."-- Peter Pesic, author of Sky in a Bottle

(Peter Pesic)

"[A] thoughtful, playful 'tour through the nano-scale world' [...] the 50 cameo explanations are clear and vivid, often with surprising details and amusing touches of humanity." Publishers Weekly



"Every page of the Deffeyes' engaging texts and striking illustrations reveals surprises about the nanoarchitecture of our world and conveys how exciting and delightful science can be. Beautiful, amusing, and richly informative, this book deserves to be a classic." Peter Pesic , author of Sky in a Bottle



" Nanoscale helps us visualize the invisible world of the ultra-small, combining both beautiful pictures with solid scientific explanation in a joyful union of art and science." Alan Lightman , author of Einstein"s Dreams and Ghost



"If you are looking for a tour through the nanoscale world, this book is a goodstarting point." Chemistry World



"The twentieth century brought us two new views of the world we live in and two new levels of understanding -- the awesome views from space and the fascinating and astonishing images of the atomic world from the electron microscope. There are many popular presentations of the former but this volume is one of the first to give us a superbly illustrated glimpse of the micro-world that controls almost every aspect of our every day lives -- both useful and enjoyable!" Lord Ronald Oxburgh , former Chairman, House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology

About the Author

Kenneth S. Deffeyes is Professor of Geology Emeritus at Princeton University. He is the author of Hubbert's Peak and Beyond Oil.

Stephen E. Deffeyes is a freelance illustrator and designer.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robert J. Deffeyes on October 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
GREAT coffee table book with beautiful illustrations. This is a readable book to help ordinary people understand a little about ordinary science if little things. Reading the work of astronomers with measurements of light years boggles the mind. Now you can have YOUR mind boggled by things measured in billionths of a meter. I guess that the publisher got so carried away with the thrill of reading about the nanometer world that they published it too close to nanosized. The beautiful illustrations would be great in a bigger format, maybe 8 by 12 coffee table size, but maybe the publisher has a smaller coffee table than I do.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark W. Jeffries on April 5, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very interesting book. Fifty 2-4 page chapters, roughly half figure and half text, cover a wide variety of topics. This book is about the nanoscale, touching on nanotubes and buckyballs, but otherwise "nanoparticles" are not addressed.

In the introduction, Kenneth Deffeyes says "Each of the 50 subjects here was selected because it illustrates how atomic structure creates a property such as hardness, color, or toxicity; because it has a great story; or sometimes simply because it is beautiful."

Though I have long had an interest in science, many of the topics became clearer in my mind after reading this book. And, one can proceed happily to Wikipedia, etc, for much more detail. One doesn't know what one does not know until an idea is presented, and one says "Gee, isn't that interesting!"

X-ray crystallography, which is used to delineate the structure of a substance, is notably discussed and used to illustrate some subjects.

A few of the items I learned from this book:
--Bees use the earth's magnetic field; to do this they have two small pieces of magnetite in their abdomens, visible by whole-body X-ray crystallography.
--Estrogen and testosterone differ only by an additional methyl group in testosterone and one more hydrogen atom in estrogen, in an otherwise sizable molecule.
--Minerals can be used as lubricants. Bonds between sheets of the minerals "are more of a matter of physics than chemistry."
--Photosynthesis has been present on earth for more than 3 billion years.
--Most animals use a molecule with iron in their hemoglobin. The limulus crab uses copper instead, and its blood is blue.
--The mineral calcite is calcium carbonate. A similar mineral of calcium carbonate is aragonite.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. Hall on June 29, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Having looked at this book, I was a little disappointed as whilst the photos of stuff from air to diamond were enlightening, I found the accoumpanying text rather less informative. I was expecting some data -packed work on the impact of nanoscale particles on the environment and living things. So this is not so much a good read, more a good look. It is essentially a catalogue of computer generated molecular structures. If this work shows anything, its that most stuff is just a bunch of atoms so in a sense most stuff is pretty much the same stuff. Its a good job that the nanoworld is invisible otherwise we'd all fall asleep.
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