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Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance Paperback – August 1, 1996

ISBN-13: 978-0262531375 ISBN-10: 0262531372

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 226 pages
  • Publisher: MIT Press (August 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262531372
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262531375
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.5 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,160,810 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

B.C. Crandall's Nanotechnology is both shocking and authoritative -- a feast for those who truly enjoy a glimpse of the future!

(Greg Bear, author of Blood Music and Queen of Angels)

In clear and compelling language, Nanotechnology describes the ideas and techniques that are creating a new domain of science and technology.

(Edward O. Wilson, Pellegrino University Professor, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University)

About the Author

BC Crandall is cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc., and the Director of Molecular Realities.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 13, 1996
Format: Hardcover
Nanotechnology, The Premier Technology of the 21st Century, is about
building things atom by atom like biology does.
About making
extraordinary things from ordinary mater (see
[...]
After reading nanotechnology, Molecular Speculations on Global
Abundance (The MIT Press), I found an ancient bottle washed ashore by
the tide.
I popped the top and to my surprise, a Green Genie
materialized before my eyes.
You have three wishes boomed the
Arabian aberration.
Cool.
Ill have nanotechnology. And your other
two wishes? And to his surprise I said, Pack up and join the ether.
Who needs magic if you have atomic precision chemistry.
This attitude is amply backed up by the stream of authors and their
thoughts presented in BC Crandalls latest work.
Prepare for anew wave
of startling ideas written by a group of the Worlds foremost
nanotechnologist.
Attention Nano Venture Capitalists.
This is the info you are looking
for.
Read and profit.
Now a summery of the authors and their
chapters:

1. Molecular engineering.
BC Crandall, the books editor, founder of Molecular Realities, Memetic
Engineering and co-founder of Prime Arithmetics inc., starts the work
with a thorough intro to the concept beginning with an explanation of
the atom, the workings of chemistry and self assembling natural
machines like DNA in a style comfortably accessible to the uninitiated
layperson.
Then Crandall moves on to A Genealogy of Nanotechnology.
Read more ›
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
The opening chapter, written by editor Crandall, is a good, necessarily cursory, summation of nanotechnology at the time of publication. The inclusion of a long list of web sites with up-to-date information is a welcome way to keep the material fresh.
If you're looking to get serious and read a discussion of recent research, look elsewhere. The remaining chapters fall into the realm of pure speculation, where futurists practice the fine art of making guesses to which no one will hold them.
Ultimately, it is exactly this light-heartedness and high-level thought experimentation that makes the book a good weekend's read. Enjoy it the way you would enjoy a work of science fiction with its technology premise solidly rooted in today's understanding of the universe.
If you enjoy this kind of reading, I would strongly encourage you to read _The Diamond Age_ by Neal Stephenson.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Eamon O. Dowling on December 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
Most nanotechnolgy books and articles start out with lots of hype to excite the reader, and then follow it up with a meandering discussion of how this might really be possible. This book was no exception. It did a good job of building up themes and exploring them in detail. The treatment of "utility fog" was extremely well done, as was the discussion of a "holodeck" type image technology.
The language and style is easily accessible to those with a basic science education, and it was refreshing that this book avoided the doomsday predictions of nanotechnology and kept the unbounded prediction for when this will all happen to a minimum.
Published in 1996, the content of this book is a good introduction, but is in danger of becoming dated due to the fast moving nature of this field. This might be the first nanotechnology book to read, but not the last for a true fan of the topic. This book might not be for you, if you've been able to read Nanosystems by K. Eric Drexler, but if you want an entertaining walk through visions of future technology, check this one out.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Worldreels on April 29, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Crandall presents ten essays out of which to construct your nanoUtopian dream. Another example of a genre called fictional science where the reader must supply the plot, characters and action. What is all this talk of nanobots and utility fog? Is man not already constructed from nanomachines? One might already ask if molecules of nicotine, aspirin, heroin or cocaine are nanomachines since they control the flow of neurotransmitters. Is molecular engineering merely the search for molecular shapes that will fit together like lego blocks-just like the search for new drugs?
Many are enamored by the way the cells and bacteria of the body construct our reality. They would like to copy these processes and rename them nanotechnology. Viewing cells and proteins as nanomachines is not new. Evolution, itself, could be viewed as a way of encapsulating cooperating cells into human shaped terrariums. Crandall quotes Richard Preston on the flesh eating Ebola Zaire virus: "seven mysterious proteins that ...work as a relentless machine, a molecular shark, and they consume the body as the virus makes copies of itself."
These writers suggest ways man could profit by controlling the design of these cellular machines. Richard Crawford's contribution suggests man designed molecules could be injected into the blood steam in order to do the bidding of cosmetic surgeons. He sees big cash to be made. Edward Reifman proposes diamond teeth but would this put dentists in the unemployment line? Brian Wowk manipulates phase array optics to enable the reader to construct a STAR TREK holodeck. J. Storrs Hall envisions filling one's environment with utility fog, placing one within a kind of pixel coated TV screen where objects in your personal space can be moved as easily as pictures on that screen.
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