Nas

Nas
July 15, 2008 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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2:12
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3:05
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3:34
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3:49
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4:00
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3:52
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4:23
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2:45
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4:33
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2:51
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2:50
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1:48
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4:16
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5:40
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4:29

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 15, 2008
  • Label: IDJ / Columbia Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 54:07
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001C3KLNA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (144 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,979 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

I would have to say this is probably Nas' best album since "Stillmatic".
Vinny Mac
This album is strong politicly, you can feel one unity, love, struggle and history about black people society and in over all, what touches modern-day issues.
erna
All my fellow Nas fans know what I mean when I say Nas "tells it like it really is".
Brian D. Crump

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 47 people found the following review helpful By ctrx VINE VOICE on July 15, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Legendary Queensbridge rapper Nas created a sizable buzz for his ninth studio album by planning a provocative title, finally deciding to leave the project untitled mere weeks before its release. However, the agenda and content remained, and the LP is equally ambitious even without the epithet. The record focuses on blackness in America.

Nas' winding career has taken him from a humble street observer to Puffy-era hustler to apocalyptic philosopher to ghetto savior to persecuted representative (and probably a few stops in between) since his 1994 debut Illmatic, frequently regarded as hip hop's greatest album. In recent years, his detractors have pointed to an oversized ego, overambitious concepts, and corniness as flaws to his music. Yet with each passing album, Nas continues to provide exactly what made him my favorite rapper before I had even hit puberty: mind-numbingly complex rhyme schemes, ingenious references and allusions that are probably lost on all but his most attentive listeners, beautifully poetic artistry, vivid imagery, impeccable delivery and style, and the inexplicably uplifting, inspirational quality he brings to any track. His latest effort is no exception.

Nas' buddy AZ is praised for the way he has updated his successful formula throughout his career on each album since his classic debut Doe or Die. Nas albums have no formula, and no two are conceptually similar. Of his discography, "Untitled" most resembles his two most recent efforts
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A. J. Rushton on August 17, 2009
Format: Audio CD
im writing this review after reading a range of reviews claiming that nas has released the most disgustingly racist anti-white anti-american album on the face of the earth, now to start with, being of mixed race (black\white if it matters to you) i was able to listen to the album without being offended at the first mention of a percieved racial slur, also not being an american i was able to listen to the album without being blinded by nationalist pride at the first mention of america not being entirely perfect, and i found the subject matter and issues adressed by the more pollitically charged tracks on the album to be quite thought provoking, and a welcome departure from the current slew of so called hip hop artists dominating mainstream music whose lyrical skills can only be described as sub par (im being as diplomatic as i possibly can and removing all the yelling\swearing that usually results when i discuss new rap) this is the type of music hip hop needs intelligent,deep and thought provoking.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Rashad Jenkins on July 15, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Aside from Nas being my favorite rapper, I can honestly say that this album is a milestone for Hip-Hop and for Nas is general. Like Public Enemy and Dead Prez (among other countless groups) Nas shows us why Hip-Hop is still the black or underground CNN, where important issues can be brought up and discussed diligently. Nas artistically rhymes about the minorities especially African Americans plight and ultimate survival in a biased and sometimes over oppressing America. Nas truly shines on this album and proves that he is the closest thing that we have for a mainstream artist that has an underground message and a civil rights consciousness. Seriously what rapper do you know can call an album N***** and intelligently explain it? These rappers play it safe and talk about stuff the average person does not live, rappers are telling us about glamor that we help provide, and we suck it up each time. Nas does not, the hours he spent reading at the library paid off, becuase he has the history and personal reflection to prove it. He literally is the Malcolm X of hip hop. Tracks like, You cant stop us now, Fried Chicken, Y'all My N*****, Project Roach, all of them are good, cop this album if not for hip hop, or the revolution, for yourself. Listen up Nas is teaching!!!!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Keith A. Jones on September 16, 2008
Format: Audio CD
On his last album "Hip Hop Is Dead" Nasty Nas was challenged by other rappers on his statement. Only problem with that was he was being challenged by rappers and not true MC's like himself. This is the thing, Nas has never let fans down lyrically. He always delievers because he has something to say. When he made illmatic he had nothing but hunger, most MC's die after that cause they get paid and loose it. Nas will always have a hunger even if it isn't the same hunger he had on that classic album. For this he will always be one of the best if not the best.

The new album from Nas is major and also showed that he is starting to learn his lesson with his music. On every album except his first two, he has songs where he forgets that he is making music and not just a rap song. He utilizes every inch of the musical art in this album and makes great hip hop music. I take a half of a star because 2 or 3 tracks were not that good, like breathe, could just be me but I didn't like it that much. He also finally went out and got good, solid, and super star producers that tailor made beats that fit Nas's style perfectly. I was surprised to see the he didn't just do this on one track but had good production on almost every track.

You have no idea how surprised I was when I saw that Pollow da don actually did a track for him. Pollow put down a beat for one of the sickest nas singles in his career. The single was just perfect all around and it grabs attention. Fried Chicken is probably the illest song lyrically on this album. He does this all the time with songs like, "I gave you power", the track "Rewind" in reverse ON Stillmatic, and even this one again with "Project Roach".

This album is by far one of the best he has had in a few years.
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