3 used from $4.50

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Nasser 56 [VHS]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Nasser 56 [VHS]


Available from these sellers.
3 used from $4.50
Amazon Price New from Used from
VHS Tape
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$4.50

Product Details

  • Actors: Ahmed Zaki, Fardous Abdel Hamid, Hassan Hosny, Ahmed Maher, Hani Ramzi
  • Directors: Mohamed Fadel
  • Writers: Mahfouz Abdel Rahman
  • Format: Color, NTSC
  • Subtitles: English
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Arab Film Distributi
  • VHS Release Date: December 8, 1998
  • Run Time: 142 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305188033
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #456,223 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Once again popular leader Jamal Abd El-Nasser inspires mass unity in the Arab World, this time as the subject of one of Egypt’s most celebrated new films. In Egypt in 1956, the World Bank suddenly withdrew its offer to finance the Aswan High Dam, setting in motion what came to be known as the Suez Canal Crisis. One hundred days later, Nasser boldly decided to nationalize the project, defying the world superpowers and bringing his country to the brink of war. With this act, Nasser won yet another battle in the war against foreign rule and took another step toward creating an independent Egypt.

Filmed in black and white, this insightful docu-drama masterfully incorporates actual archival footage into its story, lending the film a sense of historical authenticity. In an outstanding performance, Egyptian star Ahmad Zaki elegantly brings to life one of the world’s most charismatic political figures and transports us back to the most dramatic year of his presidency.

Amazon.com

In 1956, Egypt's president, General Gamal Abdel Nasser, made a incredibly bold move, defying the Western powers, by claiming the Suez Canal for Egypt. The canal had been in the hands of the British, who had signed a 100-year lease, yet Egypt gained almost nothing from the deal. In fact, over 120,000 Egyptian men (out of a population of only 4 million) died in the creation of the canal, and Egypt garnered a large debt. When the World Bank and Western powers refused to finance Nasser's high dam--the Aswan dam--Nasser decided the only way to gain the revenue was to nationalize the canal. Director Mohamed Fadel has re-created this tumultuous time in Egyptian history in his moving tale Nasser 56. Ahmad Zaki stars as Nasser, and he portrays the man in subdued tones, making him accessible to a world audience.

This film is a docu-drama--not a true documentary--and as a result, it tends to be one-sided from a Western standpoint. Not all will agree with the pleasant portrait painted of Nasser--he was not nearly as benign as this film suggests. Also, the production values are a little rough around the edges--film markings slip through and the subtitles (the film is mostly in Arabic) are white, making them occasionally hard to read. Yet, these are minor problems, and overlooking these facts, the film is remarkably done. Fadel made a wise decision in choosing to film in black and white. He was thus able to seamlessly weave in archival footage of many of the key players and events. Although the outcome is a given--Fadel does not alter history--the film nonetheless manages to be suspenseful and exciting. Even with its slow pace, the look inside the affairs of the Middle East will be fascinating for anyone with even a remote interest in global politics. --Jenny Brown

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 24, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
I have lived in Egypt during the time of Nasser and Sadat. Also, I have done social research on modern Egypt. The movie is without a doubt an excellent gratitude to one of the major Egyptian leaders in the modern history of Egypt. It has been long waited anticipating such a production, and It was worth it. Well done by one of the best contemporary directors of Egypt. Nasser deserves such a grateful look from everyone in the East and the West.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Charlotte A. Hu on April 2, 2002
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Although I saw this movie in Arabic without subtitles and my Arabic is admittedly dismal, the movie kept me tightly tied into the drama. The image of Ahmed Zaki -- a GREAT lead -- chain-smoking and contemplating the powerful move of nationalizing the Suez canal of the possible consequences and of the idea that Egypt had for so many years been figuratively "raped" by England -- really kept the tension going. There is no more powerful scene than the final image of Nasser/Ahmed Zaki praying for his country and giving a speech of perserverance in the Mosque as the tri-parti bombs rain down outside the windows of the mosque. What an incredible film! You really must see this! I also highly recommend Days of Sadat, also starring Ahmed Zaki, if it ever comes out on VHS. I was it in the movie theaters in Cairo when it was released last year.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 16, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
If you are familiar with Arabic movies, this one is painfully predictable. As most of what is produced in Egypt, it takes a lot of the political "sensitivities" of censors into account. If you are not familiar with Arabic movies, there are better starting points. If you want to learn about Nasser, read a book. If you like Nasser anyway, then you must see it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in