Buy New
$13.46
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.95
  • Save: $4.49 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Nat Turner has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Nat Turner Paperback – June 1, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.46
$5.55 $4.00


Frequently Bought Together

Nat Turner + Contending Voices, Volume I: To 1877
Price for both: $105.62

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (June 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810972271
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810972278
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #39,556 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 10 Up—Originally self-published in four installments, Nat Turner follows the dark legacy of the Virginia slave rebellion and subsequent murders of at least 55 white slave owners and their families in 1831. Baker presents a cinematic reel that integrates beautiful sepia-toned panels, newspaper headlines in period font, photographs, and historical texts; most heavily drawn from is the recorded Confessions of Nat Turner. The book begins with the brutal capture, mistreatment, and direct and indirect murder of native Africans by white fortune seekers, with disturbing detail such as the sharks following slave ships for the plentiful corpses thrown overboard. These images, as described by a young Turner to his astonished first-generation relatives, were apparently some of the first in a number of "visions" that the staunchly religious man experienced throughout his short life. Turner is presented as a fiercely intelligent, angry, yet steadfast individual whose potential was dashed in an era of hate and inhumanity. Those characteristics are mirrored in the actions of the slaves' rebellion, in illustrations that are not for the faint of heart or the weak of stomach. The ideas brought forth here are sure to ignite debate and discussion, and this book would be a most interesting companion to other studies of antebellum history such as Edward P. Jones's The Known World (HarperCollins, 2003).—Shannon Peterson, Kitsap Regional Library, WA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Kyle Baker—writer, artist, animator, director, and publisher—has written and illustrated thirteen graphic novels and won multiple Eisner and Harvey Awards. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Esquire, Spin, Rolling Stone, The Voice, EW, and Details, and he has worked for Disney, Warner Bros., HBO, Dreamworks, Cartoon Network, DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Random House, Nickelodeon, and Scholastic. He lives in New York City.








More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 18 customer reviews
Kyle Baker applied his style to a historic account of Nat Turner.
The CRITIC
What is not to love about history this is history that should be told everyone should read this book I think you will be enlighten by it.
Marcus Bates
What's more is the fact that everything is listed in the book, from acts to who these happened to, and the book makes no apologies.
TorridlyBoredShopper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Rob O on July 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is easily one of the most stunning graphic novels of the past decade, and Baker might just be one of the most important graphic novelists around now. The book is virtually wordless, except for minimal sound effects and dialog, along with historical source notes. Baker doesn't ignore the violence of his source material, but his portrayal of one of the most controversial moments in the history of slavery in America is safe enough for even very young readers.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sharon M. Galbraith Ryer on April 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
Not for the squeamish. Baker's art is graphic and pulls no punches. The brutality inherent in the Turner uprising, as well as in the conditions that led to it, are brilliantly and painfully depicted with few words other than Turner's own. A haunting portrait of the hate that hate built in the American South.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mindmatters on April 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I hated Shakespeare until a teacher suggested consulting the "No Fear Shakespeare" series first. Her advice gave me a newfound appreciation for the bard. I'm willing to bet a similar miracle can happen here. Kids who view Ambrose with contempt, may very well change their minds after reading Baker's book. Its a somber tale to be certain. But it's told with beautiful illustrations and compassionate sensibility. Revolutionaries aren't born, they're created. This book does a good job of conveying that sentiment to a younger audience. It should be noted that Kyle Baker takes a few liberties with the story. But his artwork and intent are above reproach.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jeremiah M. Bear on July 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
For Kyle Baker, Nat Turner represents a new era of depth and artistic vision. Before, there was no cartoonist wittier but now Baker has taken his talents another step forward by producing one of the most moving graphic novels in print.

I imagine there's a temptation to take an historic event this dramatic, one that starts and ends with heart-rending horror, and tie it up neatly with a cute moral or explanation. Thankfully, Baker offers neither and allows us to think for ourselves about the events described.

From a technical standpoint, the book is a marvel. A massive, moving work told almost completely without dialogue... a technique that enhances the mood rather than squelching it.

Thanks, Kyle, for Nat Turner. The bar has been raised in biographical cartooning.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By TorridlyBoredShopper VINE VOICE on December 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The Nat Turner graphic Novel adds so many things to a story that otherwise appears as a blip in most historical books. It starts out with Africans working and playing and flirting in silent captions, only to see figures in the distance as they approach. The fear is apparent on the figure's faces as they watch this mob coming toward them, too, and zooming shows that this frenzy of activity is a group of people on horseback - armed to the teeth. From there we see the struggle to run or to fight, with bullets making contact and some spears hitting their marks, and the fact that these people ultimately end up in the belly of some horrific ship. As we follow the ship we see all type of atrocities, from the branding of "goods" to the heaving of babies overboard to calm the sharks that are following the boat, and all of this sticks in a certain slave's mind. After a while we see religion also coming into play here, and these things mixed together with the conditions that these slaves face not only makes things uncomfortable but also makes some want blood-for-blood.
And, really, is it so easy to condemn Turner for what he did?

What follows is a rampage that claims 55 whites and even more blacks, and all those names are listed in the book. What's more is the fact that everything is listed in the book, from acts to who these happened to, and the book makes no apologies. And, really, why should it? I personally like this part of the book because it tells the story in a way that makes it more emotional, cutting through the dry commodities of letters and replacing them with images. In them you can see the suffering that drives Turner as he tries to gather followers, and you can see what he is doing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By scutpuppy on April 20, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my kid's English classes. I guess it's good if this is what you need for your classes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a history teacher, and I purchased this because I was debating using it in my classroom. I've always been skeptical about using graphic novels in the classroom, but after trying out (and having huge success) using Maus by Art Spiegelman in the classroom, I decided to try using them more often. This one worked excellently as well. There is very little in the majority of history books about Nat Turner, so this was an enlightening read for both myself and my students. I issue all of this praise with a WARNING though: It is very graphic. While the novel is entirely in black and white, some of the images are very graphic and students could find them anywhere from slightly disturbing to highly disturbing depending on the student. I would make sure the students are mature enough for this before assigning it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By The CRITIC on February 24, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Kyle Baker applied his style to a historic account of Nat Turner. There is nothing wrong with this graphic novel
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?