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Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Used: Like New/Very Good condition; LIKE NEW from private library of prominent NYC publisher. May have minor shelf wear. Regional field guide to birds, animals, trees, wildflowers, insects, weather and nature preserves, etc. We also sprinkle a little JOY & positive ENERGY on each order!
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National Audubon Society Regional Guide to New England (National Audubon Society Field Guide) Turtleback


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National Audubon Society Regional Guide to New England (National Audubon Society Field Guide) + Reading the Forested Landscape: A Natural History of New England
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Product Details

  • Series: National Audubon Society Field Guide
  • Turtleback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (May 26, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679446761
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679446767
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,217 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

If you're under the impression that the Northeast's natural beauty has given way to high-rises, condominiums, and suburban sprawl, this volume will certainly change your mind. In actuality, the area comprising Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont--New England, in short--is home to an abundance of flora and fauna, whether it be marine life below sea level or alpine meadows above the tree line. In fact, New England is nothing less than a naturalist's paradise. Much of the area has been scoured by glacial ice, leaving behind cirques, arêtes, and a fjord, all of which are featured in a geology section. Fossils are highlighted too, alerting readers to the presence of dinosaur footprints in both Hadley, Massachusetts and Rocky Hill, Connecticut. In addition, an easy-to-use field guide assists readers in the identification of 1,000 of the area's current inhabitants, including giant puffball mushrooms, a healthy sampling of conifers and hardwoods, and five species of shark. Field trip ideas, from secluded Baxter State Park (no paved roads, no hook-ups, no gas or groceries) to popular Acadia National Park in Maine, complete the picture. All this is compiled in a single volume that's perfect for both armchair naturalists and those planning actual trips to the area.

From the Inside Flap

Filled with concise descriptions and stunning photographs, the National Audubon Society Field Guide to New England belongs in the home of every New England resident and in the suitcase or backpack of every visitor. This compact volume contains:

An easy-to-use field guide for identifying 1,000 of the region's wildflowers, trees, mushrooms, mosses, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, butterflies, mammals, and much more;

A complete overview of New England's natural history, covering geology, wildlife habitats, ecology, fossils, rocks and minerals, clouds and weather patterns and night sky;

An extensive sampling of the area's best parks, preserves, beaches, forests, islands, and wildlife sanctuaries, with detailed descriptions and visitor information for 50 sites and notes on dozens of others.

The guide is packed with visual information -- the 1,500 full-color images include more than 1,300 photographs, 14 maps, and 16 night-sky charts, as well as 150 drawings explaining everything from geological processes to the basic features of different plants and animals.

For everyone who lives or spends time in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, or Vermont, there can be no finer guide to the area's natural surroundings than the National Audubon Society Field Guide to New England.

More About the Author

Peter Alden, principal author of this series, is a birder, naturalist, author, and lecturer. He has led nature tours to more than 100 countries and is the author of books on North American, Latin American, and African wildlife. Peter organized an event called Biodiversity Day, the first of which took place in his hometown of Concord, Massachusetts.Rick Cech, author of several sections of this guide, is a nature writer, photographer, and founder of the North American Butterfly Association's newsletter, The Anglewing.Gil Nelson, regional consultant and author of the habitats, flora, and parks and preserves sections of this guide, is a naturalist, writer, and educator who has contributed articles to many national and regional magazines. He lives in Tallahassee, Florida.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Good size for the fanny pack.
VT Fly Angler
The information is well laid out and easy to read and is accompanied by detailed color diagrams and photos.
J. Mcclure
Although I have a few birding books, I find this one is easiest to use for identification.
Pam C.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Ken Zirkel on September 30, 2000
Format: Turtleback
This guide is by no means comprehensive, but it does contain good photos and descriptions of the flora and fauna you are most likely to encounter in New England, along with geography and astronomy tidbits, too. What it adds up to is a highly useful and convenient guide; to paraphrase the beer commercial, it's the field guide to bring when you just want to bring one!
Still, if you're specifically into birds or mammals or trees only, you'd be better off getting the field guide for that specific genre, as this guide won't have enough detailed info for you.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. Mcclure on May 28, 1998
Format: Turtleback Verified Purchase
I've been searching for a book like this for the past two years. It contains information on the different types of habitats, birds, insects, reptiles, amphibians, trees, lichen, wildflowers, mammals (...the list goes on) found in the New England area. It even has a collection of star maps for people who are also interested in the New England night sky. The information is well laid out and easy to read and is accompanied by detailed color diagrams and photos. What I like best about this book though is I no longer have to carry around 5 different field guides when I go out hiking now. I only need to carry this one.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Linda Shelales on December 2, 1999
Format: Turtleback
I have waited all my life for a nature handbook such as this! So many questions I've had were answered in this book. (ie. what DOES poison sumac really look like? Or, is that REALLY just a milk snake -- or could it be poisonous?)Beautiful pictures, and clearly written, informative sections provide excellent information for nature lovers of every age. This book would be a welcome addition to every New Englander's home library and is small enough to be easily portable for hiking etc. I found myself wanting to give one to everyone I know, from grandchildren to grandparents!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 6, 1999
Format: Turtleback
This fieldguide covers more topics and includes more photos than you might think. Everything from Astronomy to flora/fauna to geology, etc. Since the descriptions are short, but the photos are plentiful, it is a good book to combine with the Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock (Cornell Univ. Press). Botsford's book is heavy on the descriptions, but short on photos. With these two books, you have everything you need for a comprehensive course on Natural History.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 14, 1998
Format: Turtleback
Imagine my delight in carrying this little book into the woods with my children and being able to share information about so many living things with them. I recommend this book to anyone fascinated by the often overlooked and unappreciated treasures of New England. The photography is great and the comprehensiveness is impressive.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ka_LaCa on June 11, 2002
Format: Turtleback
First of all, I can't believe that there are color pictures of every tree, plant, bird, reptile, insect and animal listed in this book. That is SO helpful. There is information on geography, geology, tides, National Parks, weather patterns, patterns of the stars in the night sky for every season, and so on and so on. How could they fit all this info in this tiny book??? It is bound wonderfully and doesn't exactly fit into a jean's back pocket (comes close though!).
Unfortunatley there are just too many birds in nature that look the same, so I can't tell by the book's brief descriptions and photos which bird I see. But generally I can narrow it down to at least 3.
I LOVE the ink/shadow drawings of the different trees "skeletons"! Obviously it is hard to see a tree's outline in the summer with all the leaves, but all winter I would match up the bare trees to their corresponding drawings in the book! I am becoming quite an expert now.
This book is TOPS in my ever expanding library. I bring it with me everywhere I travel in New England...because you just never know when you may need it for reference. If you live in New England, you NEED to buy this!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Pam C. on November 3, 2006
Format: Turtleback Verified Purchase
After flipping through and enjoying the sharp photography of this book, you will realize that it is also abounding in interesting facts concerning all of New England. Ever wonder what kind of fish you caught last summer or what that caterpillar will change into? Whether you need to know what kind of Oak tree is in your backyard or want to check out the constellations at various seasons - it's in this book! Great (and small enough) to take on hikes to identify animal tracks, flowers and even mushrooms! Although I have a few birding books, I find this one is easiest to use for identification. If you live in NE and want to know what is happening outdoors this book will pique your interest.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AshBear on May 27, 2011
Format: Turtleback Verified Purchase
I work in a science museum and found this book on a shelf, then instantly bought! It is a great reference for New England history, geology, ecology, and biology. Many prominent species are discussed and identified. Quick descriptions are relevant and useful. Please note, this is not a field guide dedicated to specific species or classes. It's a great resource for hikes and quick reference. For more detailed information, a specific "Mammals" or "Trees", identification guide would be more beneficial. However I have been able to use to throughout Mass. and Maine. I think it's a great starter to a field guide collection, and easy to carry around since all the information is contained in one book. I also just love to read for fun, it's filled with great information about the formation of New England and the surrounding geology.
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