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  • National Geographic - China's Lost Girls
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National Geographic - China's Lost Girls


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National Geographic - China's Lost Girls + Somewhere Between + Found in China
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Product Details

  • Actors: Lisa Ling
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: National Geographic Video
  • DVD Release Date: March 1, 2005
  • Run Time: 40 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000784WOK
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #61,169 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

To Curb the Country's exploding population, China limits most families to one child, or in certain circumstances, two children. Due to cultural, social, and economic factors, traditional preferences leans towards boys, so girls are often hidden, aborted, or abandoned. As a result, thousands of girls end up in orphanages across China. Today, more than one-quarter of all babies adopted from abroad by American families from China - and nearly all are girls. National Geographic and Lisa Ling join some of these families as they travel to China to meet their new daughters for the first time. Along this emotional journey, Lisa Ling shares in the joy of these growing families and also witnesses first hand China's gender gap, examines its roots, and discusses its possible repercussions.

Customer Reviews

We need more products of this quality.
Pastricia J. Hamilton
The scene where all of the parents actually get their children, called "Gotcha Day," is especially touching.
H. C. Thomas
This documentary is an excellent resource for those who are considering adopting from China.
photo girl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

72 of 84 people found the following review helpful By DKDC on March 3, 2005
(I did not see this dvd but saw the TV presentation. I am assuming the dvd does not have extra footage, which may be an incorrect assumption.)

I personally enjoyed it as an adoptive father of a girl born in China. In fact we met our daughter for the very first time in the exact same room shown on this video in Nanchang, Jiangxi Province. How could I not like this?

They did a much better editing job on their footage than I did on my footage!! But I still like my video better :)

Especially moving to me is the mother who puts up a poster proclaiming to whoever might see it (hopefully the birth mother) that the girl she adopted is doing fine. Then a discussion ensues with local people. I wish I could find my daughter's birth mother.

Also moving is the footage of the foster mother sobbing because the adoptive mother did not bring the girl to see her one last time. I understand why the new mother didn't bring her - it would have been VERY painful one more time for her daughter - but it made me think of the kind looking woman who raised our daughter for the first year of her life. We have a few pictures of her and my daughter but were unable to meet her or to contact her - still to this day.

They could have added so much more, as the first reviewer said, but for what it is - it is good. Kind of glossy and feel good and cable channel quality - but still good - it does in fact hit the painful issues of previous mothers and the problem of the lack of girls in China and what that will mean in the near future for Chinese society.

Some of my fellow adopters had strong feelings about parts of the movie - the footage of the foster mother in particular. But, I don't remember their points well and would not want to speak for them.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Palmer Muntz on April 11, 2005
Verified Purchase
This DVD is polished and interesting to watch. It is a great tool for showing people why one might want to adopt from China and what the process looks like when it's all done. (It doesn't represent well the 12 months or more of preparation, paperwork and expense that led up to receiving a little girl.)

I could argue pro's and con's with the other reviewers about some of the faults they found in the program--and it certainly isn't a perfect product--but I think the producers did a very good job within the constraints of the medium and time alloted. I would highly recommend this DVD to anyone who is interested in the subject of adoption from China.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By H. B. Garbe on April 10, 2006
Verified Purchase
We are in the early stages of our journey to adopt from China. This DVD was recommended to us by the adoption agency, and by far it has given us a remarkable glimpse not only into what it is life to actually travel to China and pick up your child, but into the history of why there are a million orphaned children in China, 95% of which are girls.

I agree with the one reviewer that this is not only information for those adopting but for anyone who wants to know more of the crisis facing female born children (and women in general) in China, due to the laws limiting the amount of children on can have and the desire to have that one child be a boy to ensure that the parents will be taken care of in old age (girls marry into their husbands families and care for their in-laws). In many area's if the child is female, they will go to great lengths to "get rid of" the child. The only humane method is abandonment (which is highly illegal), in which at least the child has a chance of being found and taken to a local orphanage. Many people I've spoken with about the subject state something to the effect of, "aren't women not valued as much as men over there?", not fully knowing the gravity of the plight of newborn females. Although this documentary doesn't get into the "other methods" of how the Chinese people deal with their unwanted female children, I don't think the intended subect was anything other than the growing imbalance of male/female ratio's and international adoption of these unwanted girls.

With all that said, I have found this DVD to be invaluable in helping me envision my trip to China that will be one day. My husband said jsut lastnight that I'm going to "wear a hole" in the disc if I keep playing it as much as I do (about 6 times in the past month so far! lol...). It was a very well done and we plan on showing it to all of our extended family to help them understand that even though we are able to conceive biological children, our heart is in China...
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By adopting0506 on November 17, 2005
My husband and I are in the middle of the adoption process and are going through China. The dvd made it more real to us watching the other parents get their children. Also it made me see the reality of it. Not all peaches and cream. Because you see the children screaming when they are handed over to their new parents it was very scary but then a few days later the child is in the hotel room looking like a normal child with her new parents. So I could see that it is a tough transition but the child adapts easy. But now I will expect the screaming. A friend gave us the dvd and we have shown it to other friends so they know the reason we are doing this and a little about what is going to happen.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Jethro on October 3, 2005
Verified Purchase
China's Lost Girls is an accurate 45 minute documentary that will bring tears to your eyes if you have any ties to China. Having adopted one girl from China and traveling this month to get another, our family much appreciated the video.

Bruce
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