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National Geographic: Stress - Portrait of a Killer


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National Geographic: Stress - Portrait of a Killer + This Emotional Life + Depression: Out of the Shadows
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Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Nat'l Geographic Vid
  • DVD Release Date: November 18, 2008
  • Run Time: 52 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001D7T460
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,742 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Scientific discoveries in the field and in the lab prove that stress is not a state of mind, but something measurable and dangerous. Over the last three decades, Stanford university neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky has been advancing our understanding of st

Customer Reviews

This DVD looks great and very informative.
Maru Bartlett
It touched home with me as I tend to live a very hectic, stressful life and I was amazed by the information that it shared and the method in which it did.
DP
Human fetal stress continues to impact across the life span.
Sakuteiki

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

146 of 152 people found the following review helpful By Robert L. Bayliss on September 24, 2008
Verified Purchase
So, how is stress like ice cream? Well, a little now and then is ok, a triple serving may only make you temporarily sick, but "all you can eat" might kill you!

I've followed Robert Sapolsky's work for 10+ years and he definitely is the #1 expert on the effects of stress on the brain.

Prolonged, sustained, excessive stress and your similar response to it, not only causes deterioration of your brain, but it also compromises your immune system; your ability to fight off diseases.

Thousands of years ago, we mostly lived until we either starved, were accidentally poisoned or we were eaten by another animal. Now, we have the distinct ability to slowly kill ourselves over a period of about 80 years with chemical laced foods, too much alcohol and prolonged reaction to stressful events. All are avoidable, if we make the choice to do so.

Unfortunately, most of the people who really need the information in this documentary will never see it and the vast majority who do see it will ignore it. Only those determined to live a quality life for as long as possible will pay attention to this video.

At the present time, 1 in 4 of us will die in a state of dementia or with Alzheimer's. If you want to increase your odds against that happening, then buy this video, pay attention to it, re-watch it several times and invest in a scientifically proven brain fitness program. Not just crossword puzzles and Sudoku, nor any of the popular Name Brand games that mislead you to believe that they will improve your brain or memory. Invest in yourself with a research-based program that has been scientifically designed for the human brain, extensively tested on humans, published and peer-reviewed.
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Rasih Bensan on March 7, 2009
This DVD shows how animal and human bodies are affected by stress, the harm and dangers. The threats especially to the brain, cardiovascular system and chromosomes are emphasized. Pregnant mothers under stress can transmit stress hormones into the fetus whose nervous system changes and in adult life becomes more prone to stress, stress related diseases and depression. The information here is based mostly on a Stanford University professor's study on baboons, who specializes in the neuropsychology of stress.

However, very little time is devoted to what to do about i.e. how to manage and reduce stress so that it doesn't become so lethal.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Nietzsche Infidel on February 6, 2011
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This is an AMAZING DVD backed with scientific data of how stress damages us physically and emotionally. We live in a stressful society where stress is killing us on an hourly basis.

One scientist stated that our society admires people who multitask and accomplish so much. But that is actually very stressful. She stated that we should admire people who have balanced and serene lives. I agree with her. What value does all this "over achievement" add to our lives, when it is killing us.

This is an excellent DVD, because it makes the viewer re-evaluate one's life and ask the all important question, "What should we value in life to bring about the happiness we are all searching for?"

I highly recommend this DVD.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Sakuteiki on August 4, 2011
Surround yourself with people who respect you and treat you well.
Claudia Black

Robert Sapolsky began studying stress and its relation to high blood pressure, compromised immunity and increased depression in his 30s as a professor at Stanford. Sapolsky measures blood levels of adrenalin (epinephrine) and glucocorticoids (steriods) in primates in Africa. Alpha males in a baboon troop are constantly groomed (compare with hugging, massage), have first choice of females and food, and if irritable, terrorize females infants and subordinate males with bullying. Alpha male stress hormone levels are very low. Stress hormones in the blood increase corresponding with lower levels in troop hierarchy.

30 years of collecting primate blood samples shows the long reach of stress: the brain shrinks in memory and learning neurons of the hippocampus, blood adrenalin increases, blood pressure rises, heart disease develops, immunity declines (illness increases). Being bullied increases vulnerability to disease.

Dr. Marmot carried out a similar study in humans: the Whitehall study of British civil servants. Higher in the hierarchy officers enjoy health and well being. Subordinates experience increased heart disease, correlated with declining civil service rank. British socialized medicine provides identical care to everyone so access to care and treatment do not explain the differential health status. The lower in rank, the higher the risk of lowered immunity, increased sick days, high blood pressure and heart disease, increased stress hormones in the blood.

Dr. Shively studies arterial plaque in macaques who subject one another to social stress.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By CFB on November 29, 2011
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This video is life changing. It brings to the forefront the IMPORTANCE of stress in determining our health status. I have used this personally and to open up conversations with teen groups about the need to begin early developing a strategy for living that incorporates a special understanding of our need for peaceful coexistence.
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National Geographic: Stress - Portrait of a Killer
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