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National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects and Spiders & Related Species of North America Paperback – May 31, 2007


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National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Insects and Spiders & Related Species of North America + National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Birds of North America + National Wildlife Federation Field Guide to Trees of North America
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Product Details

  • Series: National Wildlife Federation Field Guide
  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Sterling; 5.1.2007 edition (May 31, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402741537
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402741531
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 4.9 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #21,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr. Arthur V. Evans studied at the California State University at Long Beach where he received his bachelor's degree (1981) in entomology and master's degree (1984) in biology. He then attended the University of Pretoria, South Africa and earned his doctoral degree (1988) in entomology. Evans is a Research Associate at the Smithsonian Institution, Virginia Natural History Museum, and Virginia Commonwealth University.

He lectures widely on arthropod biology, especially beetles. Evans has published 25 scientific papers on the systematics, biology and identification of scarab beetles, as well as over 100 popular articles and books on insects and spiders. He was a contributing author and photographer to volume II of American Beetles, published by CRC Press (2002) and was co-author of An Inordinate Fondness for Beetles, published by University of California Press (2000). He was a contributing writer for A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert, published by the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum and the University of California (1999). He also coauthored two books on California beetles, Introduction to California Beetles (2004) and Field Guide to Beetles of California (2006), both published by University of California Press. Evans was also coeditor and contributing writer for the volume on insects for Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia (2004). He authored the three invertebrate volumes (insects, arachnids, crustaceans, mollusks, annelids) for the companion series, Grzimek's Student Animal Life Resource (2005). His National Wildlife Foundation Field Guide to Insects and Spider of North America, published by Sterling Publishing Co., appeared in 2007.

His latest book, What's Bugging You? A fond look at animals we love to hate (University of Virginia Press, 2008) is a collection of his first 51 columns in the Richmond Times-Dispatch. He is currently working on two more books, Introduction to Insects of Virginia and the Carolinas (University of Virginia Press), and Field Guide to Beetles of Eastern North America (Princeton University Press).

Evans also teams up with WCVE Public Radio producer Steve Clark in Richmond, VA for a weekly feature that airs during NPR's Morning Edition. The program "What's Bugging You - A fond Look at the Animals We Love to Hate" airs each Tuesday morning at 8:35 AM (EST). The program is archived at http://ideastations.org/radio/bugs.

"Dr. Art Evans, entomologist" is on Facebook.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Very informative and easy to understand and read.
Richard P. Staley
The kids have a lot of fun finding new bugs and then looking them up in the book.
Stephen Sheffield
This Field guid is the best out there for an avid insect collector to have.
Metcalf34

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Steven L. Mcdonough on July 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
After reading this guide through three times I rate it as a decent insect guide, but not my first reccomendation. I have been studying and collecting insects for 18 years now, and usually collect a speciman to identify even if I just to release it after a good observation. This guide does a decent job with photographs and does provide good data on the species covered. Since I live in Indiana I prefer guides that focus on the Eastern United States. This guide covers sporadicly over the whole continental US and I think that causes any guide on insects to severly truncate included species. This book did provide many specific species names to insects I was never able to identify past genus.

Each species has a color photo with range, size and some special marks listed. Included some chapters on other arthropods which was quite nice. Arranged by insect order so it makes refinding a species easier. The dragonfly section I also found very helpful, but don't have a dragonfly book yet.

I still rank Peterson's Guide as superior. It has a much more in-depth data as to what really seperates one order from another.
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Earl Mcgehee on August 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
After you get past the eye catching photo on the waterproof plastic front cover this book presents a wealth of information in an easy to use format. Each entry includes one or more color pictures and a write-up beside the picture in a consistent format. Insects of the same order are grouped together to make it easier to compare similar insects. Over 940 species are represented with 1,600 color photos. In the butterfly section each entry includes a color picture of the open wings as well as a side picture of the underside of the wings and a picture of the caterpillar. In addition to the expected background information about each group there are "How To" sections on starting an insect collection, keeping insects in captivity, planting a garden to attract insects, and macro photography of insects.

The book starts with a fold out flap that includes a ruler printed on the edge and "parts of a bug" diagram for easy reference. The inside back cover has a map of North America. The book is divided into 4 major sections (Entognaths, Insects, Arachnids and Other (Centipedes, Millipedes, tadpoles, crayfish and a few others). Within each section items are group by common name like Silverfish, Dragonflies, Mantids, Stick Insects, etc. Each of these groups is ordered by order. At the end of the book are a glossary, pronunciation guide, list of anthropod orders, list of endangered insects, list of insect zoos, a bibliography, a detailed index and a quick index.

The Peterson Field Guide is still more detailed and precise but much harder for an amateur like me to use to identify things. I now reach for this new guide first to identify my find and once I know the scientific name I can move to the Peterson guide for more details and to confirm the identification.

Hopefully there will be more guides forthcoming in this series.
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36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Wrigley on October 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
A frequent question is why another popular guide on arthropods. There is no doubt that there are a number of excellent examples on the market, but there are so many fascinating species to explore, and when a new guide like Arthur Evans' appears, it is just too good to resist. In fact, I purchased four copies (at Amazon's great price of $13.57 each, and of course shipping was free), just to give as gifts to budding and experienced entomologist friends. I have several books on insects by Arthur Evans, and have learned to acquire anything this scientist publishes. He has mastered the art of natural-history interpretation for lay people.

About 940 species of arthropods are described (names, classification, measurements, field marks, habitat, and many other life-history facts), backed by 1600 high-quality color photographs. The introductory and supplementary chapters, and order synopses are the best I have seen, and I cannot think of any topic that has been left out.

I took this guide on a recent 15-state, arthropod-collecting trip (from Manitoba to Texas, Mississippi to Minnesota) and many of the hundreds of species we captured were readily identified at some level by using this field guide. The author, photographers, National Wildlife Federation, Chanticleer Press, and Sterling Publishers have produced a wonderful guide which will fuel the enthusiasm of a generation of naturalists fascinated by insects and other small creatures of land and water. I only wish there were guides like this one when I was a child. Dr. Robert Wrigley
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Peter F. Gawne on May 3, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is my favorite field guide (I also have Peterson's and Audobon's). The pictures are good and the range/size/habitat information is listed on the same page. I very much apprecciate not having to flip to alternate pages to get the information that I am looking for. If you are looking for a book that is not in the field I would recommend Insects: Their Natural History and Diversity by Stephen Marshall, but to travel this is my favorite.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By lidybird on September 4, 2009
Format: Paperback
I work at a nursery with many greenhouses and am continually happening upon insects and spiders that i want to identify. To date this is the most helpful book i've purchased. I carry it in my car, the photos are clear, the descriptions are on the mark. I would have liked a larger spider section, but all in all i'm extremely pleased with this book, i reference it often.
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