Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Native Son (The American Patriot Series Book 2)
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on July 28, 2014
these books are so much fun to read, so interesting! I can't wait to read the next in this series as it left me wondering what happens. There are Indians, romances, spying and issues galore. I highly recommend the book but read the first in the series first to really get the full picture.
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on May 7, 2012
While I was swept away by the first book in the American Patriot series by J.M. Hochstetler, I was thoroughly grabbed emotionally as well by this second in the series, "Native Son." This book picks up where "Daughter of Liberty" leaves off.
The newfound romance between American spy Elizabeth Howard and patriot Jonathan Carleton suffers an abrupt interruption: While they are planning their wedding, General Washington is preparing to send them on dangerous missions that will separate them by hundreds of miles. Their intense love is put to a test. Can they put the needs of their new country struggling for freedom over their personal desires?
It is a heart breaking, thrilling, and gut wrenching journey on these pages filled with rich historical detail that will be visualized with clarity in readers' minds. I am so anxious to pick up Book Three in this series, as my own heart wants resolution for this couple.
This novel is a definite "Must-Read" for lovers of American History--as well as for lovers.
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on September 4, 2014
What a challenge.Ms. Hochstetler has undertaken to return the reader to the troubled times when a young America was at war with England, while islanders were moving west.in Indian territory, High interest, fast moving, and touched a love that cannot die!
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on March 24, 2013
I had been searching for a well written historical fiction series for a while and was both excited and extremely pleased to find what I was looking for. The only issue I have is I have to wait for the next book to come out. Thank you J.M. Hochstetler for a wonderful look into the forming of a great nation.
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on June 5, 2006
Native Son is the second book in author J.M. Hochstetler's The American Patriot Series, and is every bit as magnificently composed as the first. Picking up where Daughter of Liberty left off, Native Son reprises the suspenseful setting and believable characters of book one and indelibly seals the heart of the reader to the author's work.

With Patriot's identity exposed and a huge price on his head, he is no longer of any use to the Revolutionaries as a spy--but his previous experience living with a tribe of Native Americans qualifies him for an even more dangerous assignment. Oriole, however, has not yet been exposed and therefore must remain behind to continue gathering intelligence for General Washington and his troops. The intertwining of these two stories keeps readers riveted to their seats from the first page to the last--and anxiously awaiting book three.
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on December 27, 2014
Not since the works of Joseph Altsheler in the early 20th century have Native Americans been so realistically and sympathetically portrayed. The detailing of village life and governance and contrasting love vs brutality rings true. The stories behind the story of the struggle for American Independence is well told.
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on January 16, 2006
J. M. Hochstetler's second book in the American Patriot Series, Native Son, draws readers into the compelling first chapter. Brigadier General Jonathan Carleton meets with George Washington to discuss the patriot troops' readiness for war against trained British soldiers.

Meanwhile, doctor's assistant Elizabeth Howard ties down a wounded man and helps the doctor amputate the man's gangrenous leg to save his life. As a patriot spy working in a Tory hospital, Elizabeth faces constant danger of discovery.

Although Jonathan and Elizabeth determine to marry at the earliest opportunity, circumstances and General Washington's orders conspire to separate them. Carleton heads into Indian Territory, while Elizabeth stays behind. They believe God has inspired their commitment to the Patriot cause, but as the separation stretches to months, each struggles with how it will affect their relationship.

When Carleton's negotiations with several Indian tribes turn sour, the Mohawks take him prisoner. Elizabeth wonders at Carleton's fate as time passes with no word from him. As she continues her work, one of the men helping her discovers her true role and threatens to expose her as a spy. Faced with danger at every turn, both Elizabeth and Carleton draw strength from the God they trust. But will it be enough as the pressures they face slowly change each of them and each continues to wonder about the fate of the other?

Native Son holds as much historical detail as the first book in the series, Daughter of Liberty. However, Hochstetler's clear writing and obvious research make both books intriguing reads. The detail in the medical scenes is exquisite and gave me an eye-opening understanding of Revolutionary War-era amputation and medical care. Fascinating details also enhance the scenes in which the Mohawks hold Carleton prisoner and in later scenes when he lives with the Delaware Indians.

Although Carleton and Elizabeth spend most of the book separated by many miles and different cultures, the strength of both characters easily carries the book. For fans of historicals, this series is a must. Watch for Hochstetler's third book in the American Patriot series.
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on December 29, 2005
Native Son, the second book of The American Patriot Series by J.M. Hochstetler, continues the saga of Brigadier General Jonathan Carleton and the woman who has stolen his heart, Elizabeth Howard. Each has pledged allegiance to General George Washington. Elizabeth's spy mission sends her gathering information among the Loyalists, while Jonathan's orders send him deep into Indian territory. When Elizabeth learns Jonathan has been captured by the Indians, she tries desperately to gain information about the man she loves. Unable to learn of Jonathan's fate, she is forced to continue life with the uncertainty of whether or not he yet lives. Jonathan's life changes drastically when he becomes a slave to the tribe that captured him. He must make decisions that put him in battle against the people to whom he has pledged his allegiance.

Hochstetler examines a little-known aspect of the Revolution by following the hero Jon to the West. People think of the Revolution being fought in Boston and along the East Coast, but there was trouble in the West, too, with the English, the Indians, and the settlers. Hochstetler lets us see that part of the war through Jon's eyes. Again the reader finds the war-tossed couple, Brigadier General Jonathon Carleton and spy Elizabeth Howard, separated by choice for the good of the new country and your heart breaks at the sacrifices these two make for the ultimate good of many. After Jonathon is sent to Indian territory, Elizabeth ends up in Boston. With wars of all levels--spiritual, emotional, and physical-- pressing on them, we feel the anguish they must endure. Rumors circulate and both characters must pretend they care nothing for the other. The story is set in 1775, and the reader is immediately folded into the setting, riding along enjoying every bump and bruise. Even when Carleton is captured, the reader hopes all will be well, although chances are pretty much against that.

Elizabeth and Jonathan, the star crossed lovers in the previous book Daughter of Liberty, have the perfect conflict: the American patriot and the British officer. Now they are being kept apart as Elizabeth is pressed back into service as a spy for General Washington. Elizabeth is the perfect society lady, listening in on secrets in Boston, occupied by the British. Her hair-raising exploits sneaking secrets past the ruthless British blockade are the best part of the book. Jonathan, who has a price on his head, can trust no one. He goes West where he was reared and meets the Indians- not all of them friendly- he knew as a child. So wedding plans are put aside while each sets out to carry out the mission Washington has assigned them. As the months pass in silence, Beth wonders if he is even alive. Should she begin to consider a life without him? And as Jonathan is taken farther and farther away from Beth, he fears he will never see her again. How can he go back to her while the war still rages? The British want him dead, and his new life with the Indians has even made him an enemy of his own countrymen. Is their Christian faith and trust in God strong enough to see them through?

Native Son is an intensely moving story, impeccably researched and excellently written. It is an intricate look into some aspects of the birth of our nation, and the struggles and temptations faced by two unforgettable characters. J. M. Hochstetler expertly weaves a tale of historical fiction with a romance that must survive the trials and dangers of the times. Outstanding! -- Erika Osborn, Christian Book Previews.com
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on November 23, 2005
I read Daughter of Liberty a year ago and thought J. M. Hochstetler brought American history to life in that book. I hoped at the time she'd write a novel about every major battle in the American Revolution. I got my wish in Native Son, but not quite the way I expected.

I'd heard of the battles of Lexington and Concord, though I knew precious little about them. In Native Son, Hochstetler examines a little known aspect of the Revolution by follow our hero Jon to the west. We think of the Revolution being fought in Boston and along the east coast, but there was trouble in the west too, with the English, the Indians, and the settlers. Hochstetler lets us see that part of the war through Jon's eyes.

Elizabeth and Jonathan, the star crossed lovers in Daughter of Liberty, had the perfect conflict, the American patriot and the British officer. Now they are being kept apart as Elizabeth is pressed back into service as a spy for General Washington. Elizabeth is the perfect society lady, listening in on secrets in Boston, occupied by the British. Her hair raising exploits sneaking secrets past the ruthless British blockade are the best part of the book.

Jonathan, now with a price on his head, can trust no one. He goes to the west where he was raised and meets the Indians-not all of them friendly-he knew as a child.

Hochstetler introduced me to a fascinating aspect of the revolution here and I'd say more except I don't want to give away too much of the first book. If you haven't read that book, I highly recommend you read the series in order.

I loved the glimpse into the lives of George Washington as he built his guerrilla forces into a fighting army, and the names and actions of the factual British Generals, intermixed with the fictionalized daring of our heroes.

Fiction like this is a great, fun way to teach history.
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VINE VOICEon September 3, 2009
Native Son traces two lives' diverging paths during the American Revolution: Elizabeth--a Boston Tory doctor's daughter and spy for the Continental Army; and Carlton--a high-ranking officer sent among the Iroquois Nations to secure tribal allegiance to the Patriots. The young couple share a passionate love for one another, rivaled only by their commitment to freedom from the crown's tyranny. To accept these assignments means indefinite separation, mortal danger, and a plunge into the darkness of the soul.

Not a light read, I found it refreshingly honest and devoid of religious platitudes and cliche. Passages of Native American spirituality struck me with beauty and authenticity, affirming the universality of common truth. Heartbreaking and brutal at times, Carleton's journey in particular resonated with me. His battle to retain faith in the midst of personal, political, physical and total upheaval left an impression as few other stories have--challenging my own conventions, foundations and moral bedrock.

As the first in the series Daughter of Liberty was, this is a wealth of research and regional history. From the southwestern New York border where much of the book was set, I recognized and appreciated the veracity and intimacy of her details in native custom, flora, fauna and people. Almost Michener-esque in scope, this is a historical fiction piece worthy of note.

Will have to read Wind of the Spirit to resolve the romantic thread, now.
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