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Native Reading: How To Teach Your Child To Read, Easily And Naturally, Before The Age Of Three Paperback – March 5, 2008


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Native Reading: How To Teach Your Child To Read, Easily And Naturally, Before The Age Of Three + Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons + Bob Books, Set 1: Beginning Readers
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 5, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1434848817
  • ISBN-13: 978-1434848819
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #605,244 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Timothy D. Kailing was an undergraduate at Earlham College, and received his graduate degree from Princeton University, where he was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Based on his scientific studies, he developed the native-reading techniques while raising his two children, first in central Vermont, and now in southwest Michigan, where he also writes, teaches, and continues his research.

Customer Reviews

This book was very interesting for me to read.
Jen Baton
I started using the methods about 2 weeks ago (as I read the book) -- and my 2 year old is already pointing at book titles and pretending to read them.
SFmomma
I used very simple books with large print in them and consistently underlined words when I would read with my baby.
Inga Goodwin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By C. Da Roza on June 6, 2009
Despite a passionate love of books, my son Connor (almost 4 years old) is a reluctant student and teaching him to read has been grueling for both of us. To guide me in teaching him (I am no teacher - just a plain ol' graphic designer), I read several books, including "The Reading Lesson" and "Teach Your Child to Read in Just Ten Minutes a Day". I also spoke to my sister-in-law who successfully taught both of her girls to read from a very young age (she is a speech pathologist, and used her own phonics-based methods). In the six months since I started teaching Connor, we have made some progress - but he is still far from reading on his own with ease and enjoyment.

I decided to shelve the teaching for a while and seek out another teaching method, when my copy of "Native Reading" finally arrived. I gobbled up the book in three or four nights, and found it so fascinating that I re-read it again while taking notes so as to absorb even more of the tips. It's a shame that this book is not more well-known because it's something every parent should read from day one. It's a quick read, with plenty of simple, easy-to-implement techniques to help your child become a native reader. A native reader learns to read naturally, from exposure by the parent to a variety of activities which help link spoken language to written language. The focus is on keeping things interesting, engaging and fun for your child - which is something other reading programs advertise, but in all honesty, don't do well.

Native reading techniques are so fun, natural and unobtrusive for children that they don't even know they are learning. That is the beauty of the tips that Timothy Kailing shares.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Schizoid Mom on August 14, 2008
As a new-ish parent, I've been scanning the "teach your baby to read" literature and websites, and encountered the debates-- and they can get pretty bitter!-- between the whole word and phonics camps. Kailing's book shows how both sides have a point. He uses the term "native reading" to refer to the fact that we don't really "teach" kids to speak their native language, they just soak it up, so if you provide a home environment with enough correlations (Kailing uses this term a lot!) between the written and spoken forms of language, kids can gain a native understanding of the written language as well. It makes loads of sense to me, and after reading this book I felt sorry for all those parents who gave testimonials aftering having used flash cards and videos and followed some strict schedules to teach their toddlers to read. Who has time/patience/money for that? Kailing's book gives enough scientific details to impress this generally skeptical mom, but it's not overwhelming, in fact, a lot of that stuff is tucked into a notes section at the back that's easy to save for later. Kailing really makes a strong case for what geniuses all children are with language between the ages of one and three, and also usefully points out that for much of human history, most people were illiterate, so why should we think our current methods for teaching reading are all that ideal? I encourage new parents to dispense with videos and flash cards, buy this book, and start having fun helping their babies learn to read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. Waide on January 7, 2009
I am looking for materials to help me facilitate my young babies acquisition of language. My older children have such trouble with reading comprehension that I want to do all I can for my 2 babies (and any more that we may be blessed with). The theories put forth in this book appear well researched and thought out. For those who would be worried about "pushing" your baby, that is not the case with this "method." I believe from my experience in a Montessori day care that this is a great way of "preparing the environment." You expose your child to letters and words from a young age. In this way children will grow up understanding that written language is a natural part of life. I would highly recommend this book for anyone who would like to see their child(ren) have a head start.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jane Doe on March 28, 2012
Basically, the author claims that if you consistently introduce your child to written language using his 12 suggestions from the time they are born, your child WILL naturally learn to read fluently (not just recognize a few words here and there) before the age of 3. All of his suggestions are completely reasonable, such as point to the words when you read and then point at the corresponding picture to reinforce the association but don't stop the story and make your child look at the word--just keep doing it consistently.

However, his conclusion that most (if not all) children would naturally learn to read with these straight-forward suggestions doesn't really hold up. His only proof that his method works is that his 2 children learned to read using this method. He, therefore, assumes not that his children had any sort of predisposition to early reading (as some children clearly do) but that it should work for everyone. I did nearly all of these things naturally without reading his book (and I cannot image that I am the only one) and my 5 year-old never naturally learned to read. I honestly would not have been surprised if she had because she was very aware of written language from a young age and met all of his other "signs that it's working," but she never just naturally started reading. In the last year, she has started reading because of some very laid-back phonics instruction, but she is still not fluent.

Additionally, this whole book could have been easily shortened into one nice article without all the babbling and repeating in the book.

Bottom-line: I can't see any down-side to an early and consistent introduction to the written word but don't hold your breath waiting for your 2-year-old to start reading Shakespeare.
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