A Natural History of North American Trees and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$26.54
Qty:1
  • List Price: $40.00
  • Save: $13.46 (34%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 21? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $6.73
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

A Natural History of North American Trees Hardcover


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$26.54
$20.99 $15.98 $38.00

Frequently Bought Together

A Natural History of North American Trees + Forest Forensics: A Field Guide to Reading the Forested Landscape + Bark: A Field Guide to Trees of the Northeast
Price for all three: $57.82

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Up to 50% Off Materials & Chemistry Books
For a limited time, enjoy special savings on materials and chemistry titles from Springer. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (April 2, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618799044
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618799046
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.4 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #260,705 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

No Bio

Verlyn Klinkenborg is the author of The Last Fine Time, Making Hay, and the forthcoming Becoming a Hand: A True Life Among Horses. His articles have appeared in many magazines, including The New Yorker, Harper's, Audubon, Smithsonian, and The New Republic. He teaches creative writing at Harvard University.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 8 customer reviews
For in-depth history of important trees this book is very helpful.
M J Weiss
The book is now a revered classic and still worth your time and money to acquire and read.
magellan
I only wish I could thank the author personally for the gift of this perfect book.
Susan Wrublewski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Ronald M. Lanner on May 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Donald Culross Peattie's two volumes on the natural history of American trees have been rightfully regarded as classic books on their subject for the half-century since they appeared. Peattie's sparkling prose, combined with his scientific understanding and Paul Landacre's elegant woodcuts, remain unequalled in popular American nature writing. This great work deserves to be available to the public.
But what do we get? We get crumbs. Instead of the original 1357 pages of the combined works, this little summary gives us 512 pages, or 38%. Species in droves are arbitrarily thrown out -- as one example, instead of the original 32 pines this skimpy screed allows just 9. Nine pines to represent the great North American pinetum! Dendrological disaster.

Much better for the tree-obsessed reader to seek out the original volumes in used-book stores rather than settle for this insult to the author and the trees he loved so well.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Susan Wrublewski on June 6, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
How horribly unfair for an earlier reviewer to give this book one star simply because it is an abridged version. Think of how many people will see that review and choose not to read what may be the most perfect book for neophyte dendrologists ever written! Nor is the book for inexperienced tree aficionados only. Even experts will be well served by the books beautiful prose and unabashed emotion, even if only reminds them how best to inspire a love of trees in their students. I already know the Latin names of all the eastern trees in the book, and know how to identify each species by sight. Nonetheless, I was thrilled by the historical information in the descriptions, and was actually moved to tears by Peattie's description of what we have lost and will continue to lose as these trees disappear from our forests.

Each specie's unique characteristics are concisely described in the book, but each tree's character is lovingly explained, as well. Peattie writes so beautifully that you cannot help but be moved - and perhaps forever changed - by reading his descriptions. This book will make you gasp with wonder, stun you into speechlessness, make you laugh aloud with sheer joy, and probably move you to tears more than once. The few short pages about the Beech tree, for example, describe its characteristic bark and form, and explain how colonists knew a beech tree indicated good soil for planting crops. This is standard information, but how many field guides exclaim over the "gleam of its wondrously smooth bark," or remind us that the famous Beech carved into by Daniel Boone began its life fifty years before Shakespeare?

You don't need any prior knowledge of silviculture or dendrology to learn from and love this volume.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on November 11, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This was my introduction to the area of dendrology over 25 years ago. Although a psychobiology major, I went on to take six courses in botany out of an interest in learning more about plants, and I fondly remember how much fun I had learning to identify the trees on my travels in California using this book. Later I learned how to use more systematic keys to identify other plants such as flowers and fungi, but one of the fun things about trees is that, at least in temperate climates, there are relatively few species in any given area, and one can simply learn to identify them from a good nature book. (Contrast this with the fact that on an acre of Amazon rainforest, there can be 400 species of hardwoods alone). Peattie's descriptions of the trees are quite readable and sometimes even inspired. They ranged from one or two pages to up to five pages, so there is a lot of good information here. The book is now a revered classic and still worth your time and money to acquire and read.

One final note, speaking from experience in trying to identify many difficult as well as easy plants, in the case of the trees, don't forget to look at the bark, which can provide important clues. The Audubon book on trees is nice in that it incluces photos of both the flowers and leaves and the bark. For example, sycamores have deciduous bark (it peels off in parts, making the trunk look piebald), and cherry and prune trees have what's called "lenticellular" bark, which has horizontal striations. It can help you to distinguish trees which might otherwise look similar based just on the leaf, if the flowers aren't present. You probably won't have trouble indentifying a sequoia or redwood tree, but nevertheless, the bark is unusual in that it's fibrous. So don't overlook bark.

By the way, Peattie's A Diary for Moderns is also quite enjoyable and worth picking up too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By C. Wilder on July 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a lovely book written in the best spirit of natural history. It contains brief (1-5 page) entries on most of the common trees of eastern North America. It is filled with fascinating information about their biology, ecology, and social impact. The best thing about the book however, is Peattie's writing style. You can tell how much he loves these trees simply by the way he writes about them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa14f50a8)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?