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Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: A Study in the Development of Reformed Social Thought (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion (Eerdmans)) Paperback – December 30, 2009


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Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: A Study in the Development of Reformed Social Thought (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion (Eerdmans)) + Living in God's Two Kingdoms: A Biblical Vision for Christianity and Culture + The Escondido Theology: A Reformed Response to Two Kingdom Theology
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Product Details

  • Series: Emory University Studies in Law and Religion (Eerdmans)
  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (December 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802864430
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802864437
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,223,449 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David VanDrunen is the Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics at Westminster Seminary California. His other books include Bioethics and the Christian Life and A Biblical Case for Natural Law.

More About the Author

David VanDrunen is Robert B. Strimple associate professor of systematic theology and Christian ethics, Westminster Seminary California, Escondido, California.

Customer Reviews

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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Matt Tyler on August 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
David VanDrunen has made an invaluable contribution to historical theology with his exhaustive treatment of Reformed Social Thought, focusing specifically on the Two Kingdoms and Natural Law doctrines. With incredible precision, Vandrunen surveys history of Reformed Theology from Calvin up to contemporary thinkers such as Cornelius Van Til, Meredith Kline, and North American Neo-Calvinism. VanDrunen structures his arguments well, with each paragraph defending a contained thesis. He begins with an introduction of his thesis, defense of his thesis, and a summary conclusion. Each chapter is densely argued with extensive evidence from primary sources. His writing style exudes scholarly coolness and objectivity rather than a polemical agenda (though he certainly has a point to argue and defend). As a result, VanDrunen has crafted strong arguments for his claim that the Two Kingdoms and Natural Law are integral ideas to Reformed theology that have largely been lost in contemporary expositions.

VanDrunen's best and most original contribution comes when he turns to the early American developments in Reformed social thought (Ch.6). Here VanDrunen focuses on a rather neglected aspect of the Reformed tradition. He shows the difference between the Puritan traditions with subsequent disestablishment traditions in Southern Presbyterianism, with particular focus on the much-maligned doctrine of the Spirituality of the Church. What makes this chapter so valuable is that VanDrunen argues that here the Two Kingdoms and Natural Law traditions finally receive their most consistent expositions. For those wondering how Two Kingdoms proponents can have diverted from Calvin, Turretin, the Puritans, etc...
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By John A. Battle on August 30, 2010
Format: Paperback
During the last few years a new controversy has come to conservative Reformed circles. Historically Reformed and Presbyterian writers believed that secular nations should be ruled by natural law, which people can derive from nature, history, and conscience. This law is basically the same as the "moral law," the Ten Commandments, especially those commands regarding our duty to our fellow human beings. According to these early writers, God rules over the nations of the world in his sovereignty, and holds them responsible to obey and uphold this natural law with the power of the sword. Jesus, as the Son of God, is sovereign in this way, along with the Father and the Holy Spirit.

On the other hand, earlier Reformed writers recognized Jesus Christ as sovereign over his special kingdom, the church. The church is guided by the Bible as a whole, and enforces the will of Christ by its spiritual authority, not by physical force. Jesus, as Messiah and Mediator of the new covenant, is sovereign over this second kingdom.

According to this traditional understanding, the civil laws of the Old Testament were directed to national Israel under the theocracy. They were not intended for the other nations, nor are they applicable today, except as they are tied to natural law.

David VanDrunen believes that this traditional scheme is biblical and correct. He further demonstrates in this book that this was the view of mainstream theology in the church, from the times of the church fathers, through the Middle Ages, through the Reformation times, and since then through the nineteenth century.

However, in the last century many Reformed writers have attacked this position, and have taught in a single kingdom of Christ, denying the two kingdom and natural law teachings.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By J. Remington Bowling on May 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Summary:

VanDrunen examines the idea of two kingdoms as it has existed in church history, especially in Reformed theology. Basically, VanDrunen demonstrates that the following ideas have been affirmed throughout Reformed thought (and prior: Augustine, Aquinas, Ockham, etc): There are two kingdoms, one redemptive ruled by Christ as redeemer, the other temporal ruled by "Christ" or God as creator, sustainer. Natural law is the standard for rule in the civil/temporal kingdom and Scripture is the rule in the redemptive kingdom. Christian activity in culture is predicated on common grace and the natural law. However, some of the prescriptions the Mosaic law (e.g. the Decalogue) are particular instantiations of natural law (it's not clear whether all prescriptions in the Bible would be viewed as instances of natural law). The church belongs to the redemptive kingdom and earthly governments to the civil kingdom.

Yet almost universally, Reformed theologians have not applied this doctrine consistently. Each person has, in some way, mixed the two kingdoms. Thus, along the way, VanDrunen charges the persons with inconsistency. Some of these inconsistencies can be reconciled (e.g. by understanding the way in which some understood statecraft to be soulcraft); nevertheless, some inconsistencies remain (e.g. the influence of the Consistory upon the government in Geneva).

Starting with Dooyeweerd (but germinating in some Kuyperian ideas), Reformed thought turned away from the two kingdoms doctrine to what VanDrunen classifies as "neo-Calvinism." Neo-Calvinism teaches only the redemptive kingdom and gives the cultural activities of Christians an "eschatological burden." Christian activity in the culture is predicated in the redemptive work of Christ.
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