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Nature Writing: The Tradition in English Hardcover – February 1, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0393049664 ISBN-10: 0393049663 Edition: 2 Sub

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1024 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 2 Sub edition (February 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393049663
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393049664
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 5.8 x 1.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #449,597 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

These two new volumes join the increasing number of fine nature anthologies compiled to serve as textbooks for college courses on literature and the environment and to provide perspective on the evolution of nature writing. As the expanded second edition of The Norton Book of Nature Writing, Finch and Elder's collection includes 133 authors, increased from 94, and almost three times as many women authors. Writers from the traditional nature-writing canon, such as Thoreau and Muir, are included along with minority writers who offer a different perspective on nature and our relationship to the environment. In At Home on This Earth, an anthology of female nature writers, Anderson (Sisters of the Earth) and Edwards (Such News of the Land) include well-known authors such as Rachel Carson and Annie Dillard, as well as obscure though once-prominent authors such as Olive Thorne Miller and Edith M. Thomas. In addition, they have broadened the notion of what nature writing is by including writers not conventionally a part of this genre such as bell hooks and Alice Walker. Both books cover two centuries of writings in English arranged chronologically to highlight the differences and similarities between writing of the past and present. Almost as important as the selections are the author bio-sketches and critical comments about their works, which provide the historical and social perspective for each selection. The Norton work is limited to nonfiction essays, while selections from the 51 authors featured in At Home include essays, short stories, journal entries, and memoir excerpts. Both works are essential for nature-writing collections and are highly recommended for any collection. Maureen J. Delaney-Lehman, Lake Superior State Univ., Sault Ste. Marie, MI
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

In the dozen years since Finch and Elder constructed The Norton Book of Nature Writing, the genre has evolved significantly in literary splendor, stylistic and topical diversity, popularity, and urgency. This renaissance inspired essayist Finch and environmental studies professor Elder to create a new chronologically organized anthology that showcases 40 emerging and rediscovered nature writers and such giants as Emerson, Thoreau, Leopold, Dillard, and Lopez. One of the most obvious changes from the first edition, as the editors readily attest, is the inclusion of many more women, from noteworthy pioneers Susan Fenimore Cooper and Mary Austin to imaginative newcomers Janisse Ray and Alison Hawthorne Deming. British, Canadian, Caribbean, and Australian writers are also represented as are Native American writers, including Linda Hogan and Leslie Marmon Silko. Even the realm called nature has been extended to embrace gardens and farms, the "working landscapes" scrutinized by Michael Pollan and Gary Paul Nabhan. Superb choices in writers and works make for a substantial and illuminating volume, a landmark in a genre of increasing consequence. Donna Seaman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on July 11, 2002
From Charles Darwin and Aldo Leopold to Edwin Teale and Laurens Van Der Post, this covers the history and tradition of nature writing in English. Essays and insights by some of the most famous nature writers in the language include writers of diverse ethnic backgrounds and from around the world. A widereaching collection, this will appeal to both science and literary collections.
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By Erin L. Branch on September 17, 2011
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I use this book in a course I teach on nature writing, and it's a great anthology for students--you can introduce them to a ton of different writers and texts without asking them to buy a dozen or more books. It's pricey (and I know there's another college student edition, but I like this one better), but worth it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hawaiian Ice on October 1, 2012
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This product was decent. It was pretty used, but I bought it knowing the fact. It was exactly what I had expected it to be. So, overall I am happy with it.
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2 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Karen Aaker on September 14, 2007
Annie Dillard's book is mostly a composition of nonsense. Here is an execrpt from the book;
"I look at [the grasshoppers'] tapered, chitin-covered abdomen, plated and barred as a tank tread, and was about to turn away when I saw it breathe, puff, puff, and I grew sympathetic. Yeah, I said, puf, puff, isn't it? It jerked away with a buzz . . . and continued to puff in the grass. So puff it is, and that's all there is; though I'm partial to honey myself."
The book is full of nonsensical garble like this. If anyone has an explanation to this, feel free to correct me!
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