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  • Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants
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Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants


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Paperback
  • 512 color photos, demonstrating each edible part in the proper stage of harvest, plus showing important identifying features
  • Acorns! - everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask
  • Step-by-step tutorial to positive plant identification
  • Photos and text comparing potentially confusing plants
  • Thorough discussion on how to gather and use the plants
43 new from $13.47 20 used from $13.47 1 collectible from $54.89

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Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants + The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants + Rosemary Gladstar's Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use
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Product Description

Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants. Nature's Garden follows the same award-winning format of Samuel Thayer's first book, with in-depth chapters covering 41 new wild edibles. In this volume you will find the most authoritative accounts of several important food plants, such as hackberry and American lotus, available anywhere. You will find mouth-watering photography of cranberries, blueberries, huckleberries, strawberries, wild plums, and more. You'll hear of new methods for using dandelions. You'll finally be able to make sense of the tricky wild lettuce/sow thistle group. You'll discover that wild carrot and poison hemlock can be reliably told apart, thanks to a detailed chart accompanied by 19 photographs. You'll read about vegetables with a rich tradition of use around the world that are largely ignored in the wild food literature, such as cow parsnip, patience dock, and honewort. You can read more exciting myth-busting about poisonous plant fables and the maligned black nightshade, plus anecdotes about purple children and the hazards of eating cacti. Yet perhaps the best part of all is the book within a book about acorns: 51 pages of the details that turn these nuts into food. Sturdy Smythe Sewn Binding.Detailed information on harvest, preparation, and storage techniques.A foraging calendar showing harvest times for wild foods.A glossary of botanical terms illustrated with line drawings.Bibliography and recommended reading list.Fully Indexed for convenience.Author - Samuel Thayer.Binding - Paper - 6"x9".Pages - 512.Publisher - The Forager's Harvest Press.Year - 2010.ISBN - 9780976626619.About the Author - Samuel Thayer - is a natty dresser, he first led nature walks at 19 and besides wild food foraging, Sam is an all-around naturalist with particular interest in reptiles, amphibians, bird watching, botany, and mammals. His passion for wild food extends to studying the origin of cultivated plants and the soci...

Product Details

Color: Paperback
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 9 inches ; 2.2 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: 0976626616
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (195 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

It's not a book you borrow, but one you will want to own.
Joanne of Joanneunleashed website
I also prefer books with good descriptions, lots of photos of each plant to make identification easier, and to cover the plant from identification to the plate.
" Anti Microchip "
I have several Wild Edible books and this along with "The Forager's Harvest" is by far the best I have ever read.
P. Kennedy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

474 of 481 people found the following review helpful By Tim Smith on April 1, 2010
Color Name: Paperback
These are not good times to put out a book on edible wild plants. Unless you're Samuel Thayer.

When I reviewed Thayer's first book, The Foragers Harvest, I wrote that it is as good or better than anything available on the topic. It has since become the go-to book for students at the Jack Mountain Bushcraft School. His new book, Nature's Garden, builds upon the high standard set by The Foragers Harvest and establishes him as the leading authority and author on edible wild plants that has ever published. It isn't slightly better than other books on the topic; it's in a whole different league.

The meat of the book is made up of plant accounts. These are in-depth profiles of edible plants, full of photos of how to identify, harvest and use them. The author bases all of his work on personal experience, so there aren't the usual falsehoods handed down by authors of lesser works. Instead, you get what works, along with anecdotal stories of how the author got to know the individual plants and how he's used them in the past. His writing style is conversational, and while there is a description for each plant that includes botanical terminology, the author writes it so as to make it accessible to the non-botanist. The numerous photos contribute greatly to aid the neophyte in identifying the individual species. The Harvest And Preparation section for each plant is where the author's experience really shines. Whereas the Peterson's Field Guide To Edible Wild Plants will list "starchy root" or similar descriptive term after a plant, Thayer has several pages of highly descriptive how-to information. To use a specific example, most books on edible plants have a sentence or two on acorns. Nature's Garden has 50 pages.
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219 of 220 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Krebill on April 8, 2010
Color Name: Paperback
Whether you're a newbie or an experienced forager, you'll find this book fascinating and a must-own. I have over 200 books on edible wild plants, and this is far and away the best ever published.

A visual and informative treat that is hard to put down, its 512 pages are well illustrated with 415 color photos. Sam brings us fresh insights on 41 new plants. ("New" because the first book in Sam's series, The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants covered 32 other plants.) One of the great things about Sam's writing is that it is absolutely authentic, based on first-hand knowledge. For instance, every one of the 32 plants in TFH is one that Sam has eaten at least 50 times.

A second thing that distinguishes Sam's work from other authors is that Sam has a great curiosity. He doesn't hesitate to question edible wild plant claims made by other authors. He delves into research reports and studies, experiments on his own and keeps track of his findings like a scientist. His "Nature's Garden" account on acorns is 51 pages long, and contains information and a synthesis of material and insights that you'll not find anywhere else.

One of the plants included in NG is garlic mustard, which I had written off as an edible that wasn't to my liking. I've cooked and eaten the leaves, the flower buds, and the tuberous root. I've nibbled on the bitter, pungent seeds. In his chapter on garlic mustard, Sam writes that the young, succulent stalks, stripped of leaves before the plant blooms, are mild, sweet and juicy.
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102 of 104 people found the following review helpful By John N. Kallas on February 5, 2011
Color Name: Paperback
This excellent book is a continuation of the fine work Sam started with his first book, A Forager's Harvest. This book covers new plants and is a whopping 512 pages; large when you consider that most wild food books fall in the range of 180 to 300 pages. And again, even though most of the plants are found in the eastern states, many have a wide range, or they are edible weeds found everywhere, or they are native eastern plants planted as ornamentals in neighborhoods and streets across the continent, or they are cousins of eastern plants, like the western huckleberries are to blueberries. So many of the plants he covers are accessible just about anywhere except for the desert, the Everglades, and higher elevations. And the depth of coverage of each plant makes this book valuable to those who really want to know plants.

The book is divided into two parts: The first 74 pages cover conceptual ideas such as where to forage, why eat wild foods, environmental considerations, plant identification, his take on the public perception of the dangerousness of plants, and his take on Chris McCandless' death (as portrayed in Jon Krakauer's book, "Into the Wild"). I particularly liked Sam's personal account of "One Month Eating Wild". His experience has a lot to teach those thinking about living off of wild foods; a common fantasy of us testosterone-poisoned males.

The last 304 pages cover plants, a chapter at a time. Sam provides useful detail on the foods generated from each plant. He covers plants that no one has really covered well before. His American lotus and black nightshade chapters were just fun for me to read, even as a seasoned professional. And I love the foods he's generated with acorns. His acorn chapter alone could be a small book at 51 pages.
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