Customer Reviews


13 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (6)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Violent but Good Spaghetti Western
Burt Reynolds in the title role takes out revenge on Aldo Sanbrell and his gang in this extremely violent and unsympathetic Spaghetti Western. This film shows off Reynolds' great physique and athletic prowess (circa 1966) under Sergio Corbucci's direction. Ennio Morricone (Leo Nichols) composed a rather over the top pseudo-American Indian score which is just wild. The...
Published on June 26, 2001 by gobirds2

versus
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Smokey and the Bandit meets the Spaghetti Western
Burt Reynolds (before his frantic car chase days)plays a Native-American Man-With-No-Name in an Italian western straight out of the mid-1960s, when these things were a fad. Burt is tight-lipped and stoic as he trails a band of killers who murdered his wife and other innocent victims in a "scalphunter" raid. The outlaw gang looks like a reunion of Sergio...
Published on October 8, 1999 by Robert S. Clay Jr.


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Violent but Good Spaghetti Western, June 26, 2001
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Navajo Joe [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Burt Reynolds in the title role takes out revenge on Aldo Sanbrell and his gang in this extremely violent and unsympathetic Spaghetti Western. This film shows off Reynolds' great physique and athletic prowess (circa 1966) under Sergio Corbucci's direction. Ennio Morricone (Leo Nichols) composed a rather over the top pseudo-American Indian score which is just wild. The final confrontation between Reynolds and Sanbrell is so incredible it has to be seen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Finally, February 23, 2008
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
Navajo Joe suffers from mediocre makeup effects and below average scenery, but it makes up in story intensity, drama and most of all music. Morricone's score gives you goosebumps and it makes the movie so much more emotional. The reason why people are longing to see this movie on DVD, is that it is a quintessential Spaghetti Western, one of the must see films of the genre, with the music so popular, the star so famous and the finale so memorable, it is a wonder MGM hasn't released this one years ago (this is a copy of my review I wrote at the Spaghetti Western Database, swdb.info)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Burt Goes Italian, July 19, 2010
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
Before Burt Reynolds became a hot property, he went to Italy probably hoping to catch the fire that Clint Eastwood found and made 'NAVAJO JOE' the fifth western by director Sergio Corbucci. Burt has said in past interviews that its his worst film but he couldn't be more farther from the truth. It's one of the best spaghetti westerns of the mid sixties with a stellar cast including Fernando Rey and the beautiful Nicoleta Machiavelli as the mute Indian girl who becomes Burt's sidekick. The true scene stealer is the awesome Aldo Sambrell as Duncan, the leader of a band of outlaws who are getting paid for Indian scalps and who stops at nothing to try to bring down Burt. Corbucci delivers the goods with non stop action throughout its running time. The music score is under the direction of the master, Ennio Morricone, who is billed under an alias ,Leo Nichols, which he also used for his excellent score for Corbucci's 'THE HELLBENDERS' released the same year. MGM gives the release a pristine widescreen transfer, lets hope they release 'DEATH RIDES A HORSE' and 'GUNS FOR SAN SEBASTIAN' in the near future with the same quality. This film is one of my favorite guilty pleasures which I find myself coming back to on repeated viewings. Its fast, bloody, and honorable, and sorry, Burt, its better than'100 RIFLES'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Fistful of Burt Reynolds, September 7, 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
This cynical Sergio Corbucci horse opera about the eponymous Native American hero wreaking vengeance on a murderous gang of cutthroat renegades for murdering his woman and massacring his village qualifies as a stalwart, traditional Spaghetti western with nonstop riding, shooting, and killing galore. Killing constitutes a virtual reflex action in this savage, above-average shoot'em up. "Gunsmoke" actor Burt Reynolds must have been in the best shape of his life to pull off some of his stunts. He leaps and he lunges as if he were a born acrobat. For example, trussed upside down by the evil villains, he gets a little help from a sneaky city slicker and crunches up to untie his ankles. Remember how Richard Gere did sit-ups dangling by his ankles from the ceiling of his apartment in "American Gigolo?" Burt performs similar stunts and is as nimble as a ninja. Masquerading as Leo Nichols, "Fistful of Dollars" composer Ennio Morricone conjures up another memorable, atmospheric orchestral soundtrack with traditional Indian chanting, screaming, and steel string guitar thumping. Quentin Tarantino thought so much of it and he sampled Morricone's score in his two sword-wielding "Kill Bill" sagas. "Hercules, Samson, and Ulysses" lenser Silvano Ippoliti confines all the rampaging violence very skillfully with his widescreen compositions so it looks very cool. Some of Ippoliti's more imaginative set-ups occur when he obscures the identity of one of the villains during a saloon conference scene.

"Navajo Joe" is one of a fistful of westerns where the only good Indian isn't a dead one. Few American westerns would celebrate the Native American as Corbucci does in "Navajo Joe." Joe is pretty doggoned smart for a savage. Veteran Spaghetti western villain Aldo Sambrell is as treacherous as they come. So filled with hate is he that he kills without a qualm. No sooner has Mervyn 'Vee' Duncan (Aldo Sambrell of "For A Few Dollars More") shot, killed, and scalped Joe's Indian wife than Joe hits the trail in pursuit of Duncan and his gang. Gradually, Joe begins to whittle down the opposition. Meanwhile, Duncan discovers that the authorities in the town of Pyote where he once sold scalps have posted a bounty of both himself and his half-brother. Just before Duncan's blonde-headed brother Jeffrey (Lucio Rosato of "4 Dollars of Revenge'') drills the sheriff with his six-shooter, the lawman informs an incredulous Duncan that he is wanted for murder. Duncan points out that he has been bringing the sheriff the scalps of Indians for years. "The scalps you brought then were those of troublemakers," the lawman points out. According to the sheriff, things have changed. "Now, you're attacking peaceful tribes, killing even the women and the children." A prominent doctor convinces Duncan to rob a train heading for the town of Esperanza. He warns Duncan not to try and blow up the safe because an explosion will destroy the half-million dollars in the safe. He knows the combination and they can split the loot. This part of the "Navajo Joe" screenplay by "Fistful of Dollars" scribe Fernando Di Leo, "Hills Run Red" writer Piero Regnoli, and "Mafia" scribe Ugo Pirro sounds somewhat like "For a Few Dollars More" when Colonel Mortimer persuades El Indio to let him open the safe because too much dynamite might destroy the loot. Before Duncan leaves town, his gang and he set it ablaze.

Predictably, Joe intervenes and steals the train from Duncan after the villainous dastard has massacred all the passengers, including a woman and her baby, along with the U.S. Army escort. Joe takes the train to Esperanza and offers to liquidate the gang if they will pay him a dollar for each head. Eventually, Duncan captures Joe and tries to learn the whereabouts of the money, but Joe does not talk. Duncan ranks as one of the most heartless outlaws. He shoots a preacher point blank in the belly with his six-gun after the minister thanks him for not wiping out their town! This trim 93-minute oater features a lean, mean Burt Reynolds wielding a Winchester like a demon and decimating the ranks of the bad guys. The Spanish scenery looks as untamed as the ruthless desperadoes that plunder one town after another. "Django" director Sergio Corbucci never allows the action to slow down. Despite its many sterling qualities, "Navajo Joe" never achieved the status of other Corbucci westerns like "The Mercenary," "The Grand Silence" and "Companeros." The no-frills MGM DVD presents the action in widescreen with several languages in subtitles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Smokey and the Bandit meets the Spaghetti Western, October 8, 1999
By 
Robert S. Clay Jr. (St. Louis, MO., USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Navajo Joe [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Burt Reynolds (before his frantic car chase days)plays a Native-American Man-With-No-Name in an Italian western straight out of the mid-1960s, when these things were a fad. Burt is tight-lipped and stoic as he trails a band of killers who murdered his wife and other innocent victims in a "scalphunter" raid. The outlaw gang looks like a reunion of Sergio Leone extras. The plot is one long search and destroy as "Joe" (a/k/a Burt Reynolds) wreaks havoc on the bad guys. One definite strength of the film is the exciting background music, by Ennio Morricone. (The same composer who did the Clint Eastwood Italian westerns). Anyway, don't expect a John Ford classic western. The desolate Spanish countryside is no comparison to Monument Valley. There is no poetry and art here. Only brutal, fast, and violent action, which takes place with very little fake blood spilling all over the screen. The final showdown in the Indian grave-yard has an air of mystery and tragedy as our hero fights to the death among his ancestors. The last scene of the riderless Indian pony manages some slight poignancy. European westerns, much as Japanese science-fiction movies, are not for everybody. Those with the acquired taste should find this one a likable time-waster. Love that crazy drumbeat and human voice combination in the theme music
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Spaghetti westerns, March 7, 2013
This review is from: Navajo Joe (Amazon Instant Video)
A real gem of a film that is an absolute must see if you like the genre. The musical score is dead on and adds so much to the film. There is only one awkward moment that I can think of and it is one Burt Reynold's lines that just does not come off right. Other than that this has become one of my all time favorite movies. My kids love it as well, just keep in mind that there are several scenes that we make them cover their eyes. I just wish that these type of movies were still being made. Unfortunately they are harder to come by now. Enjoy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Young Burt Reynolds saves the lives of the Indians., December 9, 2003
By 
James McDonald (Lancaster, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Navajo Joe [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Here is an interesting early Burt Reynolds film released in 1966. It is a foreign film of Italian-Spanish. An interesting role for Burt Reynolds because in real-life he has Indian in him. Reynolds was probably the age of 29 at the time this was filmed. Good western. The villain, "Duncan" likes to scalp Indians. Navajo Joe (Burt Reynolds) looks out for his people on a white horse. Even when the saloon girls try to make a run for it to get away from the evil Duncan, Navajo Joe saves the girls lives. Native Indians will like the ending of this one. I would like to recommend My Name Is Nobody (1973), starring the unforgetable Terence Hill, with Henry Fonda and Steve Kanaly (Kanaly later co-starred in the "Dallas" tv series).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No extra features, but you'll live, May 16, 2008
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
I just bought the DVD today, great presentation. Picture looks great, anamorphic widescreen, pretty much what the fans have been waiting for. It's pretty cheap, too. Would've been nice to see some special features. I would've enjoyed seeing maybe a new interview with Burt Reynolds, maybe see his thoughts today on the film. I have gained a greater appreciation for the film. This is a much better presentation than that pan and scanned version present in the Wild West Box set. If you're a fan of Burt Reynolds, Sergio Corbucci, westerns, spaghetti westerns, or anything that applies to this film, buy it! You will not regret it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Burts only Italian western, June 4, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
I think Navajo Joe was based on a French comic book series by JiJi the mentor of Blueberry's GIR/Mobius.
In any event Burt Reynolds seems to be expanding his role from the Gunsmoke TV series. It is a decent western and Burt is first class. I know it was at the start of his rise to movie stardom in the late 1970's
A nice tough little western.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Burt's Spaghetti Western with Sergio Corbucci, not Sergio Leone, December 25, 2014
By 
Wuchak (Eastern USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Navajo Joe (DVD)
"Navajo Joe" is a spaghetti Western from 1966 starring Burt Reynolds as the titular Native warrior who seeks revenge on a gang of sadistic outlaws who massacred his wife and tribe.

They say Italians have been making the worst movies for a hundred years, but "Navajo Joe" is pretty good for a spaghetti oater. In an interview Reynolds admitted that he took Clint Eastwood's example (whom he replaced on the TV series "Rawhide") by going to Europe and starring in an Italian Western; unlike Eastwood who got Sergio Leone, however, Burt got Sergio Corbucci.Despite this, Reynolds was in his prime and looks robust; being a stuntman, he did all his own stunts, which is impressive when you view the movie.

Other highlights include the typically outlandish but memorable score by Ennio Morricone (pseudonymously credited as Leo Nichols), which is reminiscent of his later score for "Burn!" and raven-haired Nicoletta Machiavelli as Estella, a half-breed who takes a liking to Joe. Other than this, the typical revenge plot moves right along for a fairly entertaining 60's European Western where the dubbed voices don't match the lips. "Navajo Joe" may not be great, but it's amusing enough.

The film runs 93 minutes and was shot in Spain.

GRADE: B
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Navajo Joe [VHS]
Navajo Joe [VHS] by Sergio Corbucci (VHS Tape - 1998)
$14.95 $6.00
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.