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The Neal Adams Collection (X-Men Visionaries) Paperback – July, 1996


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Paperback, July, 1996
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Product Details

  • Series: X-Men Visionaries
  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Marvel Entertainment Group; Gph edition (July 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785101985
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785101987
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 6.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,318,265 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Great artwork and the story is pretty neat too.
Aled
Also, the recoloring of these pages is horrible, so even though Marvel trumpets Adams' work, their lack of care in reprinting it doesn't back it up.
Babytoxie
Neal Adams inspired many of today's artist like John Byrne and Jim Lee to become the popular comic book artists they are today!
N. Kok

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Schumacher on February 7, 2002
The Thomas/Adams era of X-Men is mostly forgotten: everyone seems to remember the original X-Men as being complete failures. This book actually shows that the original X-Men could be interesting characters; these were the books that Claremont, Cockrum and Byrne were flipping through during their early days to get the feel of the series. However, it should be noted that the editorial decision to not include any issues -not- penciled by Neal Adams is a bit insane. Because of this we come in half-way through the (first!) Havok storyline, and the first appearence of Sunfire is left out, as is the famous fight with the Hulk, which was also their last issue. Hopefully some day we will see these in reprinted form, as the originals are almost impossible to get.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Babytoxie on December 26, 2004
At times, I have difficulty with the concept of Marvel's "Visionaries" books. When the book focuses on a writer (like Chris Claremont) or a writer/artist (like Walt Simonson or Frank Miller), it's good, as you get grade-A stories that signalled changes in direction for certain books. When the book focuses solely on an artist, however, it's not so good, as no matter how good the art is, there's no telling what you'll get in terms of story quality. Also, you only get issues with that artist's work, so incomplete stories and fragments can be quite prevalent.

Such is the case with X-MEN VISIONARIES: NEAL ADAMS, spotlighting the 1969 X-Men issues illustrated by one of the greatest comic artists of all time. One thing that you should be aware of is that, in 1969, the X-Men, currently the world's most popular super-team, was in the dumpster. The stories were not that great, the art was generally horrible, and as a result, no one would touch this series with a ten-foot pole. But then came Neal Adams to spice things up a bit, drawing issues 56-63 and 65, knocking people out with his realistic depictions of our beloved teenage mutants. Artistically, these issues are excellent, and they rightly got the attention of readers. Even with this artistic jolt, however, Roy Thomas' writing is painfully melodramatic, and no amount of good art can fix that. In addition, Adams' artistic chores began in the middle of an ongoing story, and as this book contains no non-Adams material, you won't get a complete story. Also, the recoloring of these pages is horrible, so even though Marvel trumpets Adams' work, their lack of care in reprinting it doesn't back it up.

So, this book is a great artistic experience combined with some laughable stories.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain on April 1, 2003
The 2nd print is very close, but no cigar. After the computer coloring hack job of the first print, Marvel redid some of the issues, as there were originally printed 30 years ago. Unfortunately, there are still some pages, here and there, that still have this bad coloring work. On top of it, I now see some colored pages from the 80's special edition reprints making it an inconsistent mess.
Hopefully by the time Marvel releases the 3rd print, ALL of the coloring for this collection will be brought back to its former glory.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 31, 2003
You have to remember before issue #56 of the "X-Men" came out in 1969 that the comic book was hurtling towards oblivion (which meant it would became a reprint title for Marvel). Jim Steranko had come in and done a few wonderful issues but then we had issue #53, which we all thought was the worst drawn comic in the history of the world. The artist was some young kid off the boat from England named Barry Smith who was clearly trying to imitate Jack Kirby (what we did not know was that Smith had literally drawn the pages sitting on benches in Central Park. In what was clearly a final but big time effort to save the X-Men, Neal Adams was brought in as the artist, the pages inked by Tom Palmer, the stories written by Roy Thomas and then Dennis O'Neil. For those who had suffered through issues drawn by the competent but uninspiring Don Heck, the nine issues drawn by Adams raised the bar for what the art in a comic book could look like. Whereas Steranko was the master of style, Adams provided a realism that was just great, as he went on to show while drawing Batman and Green Lantern/Green Arrow for DC.
Collected in "X-Men: Visionaries - Neal Adams" are issues #56-63, and 65 of "X-Men," published originally in 1969-1970, and since all of them run for over $100 in proverbial near mint condition, this is a nice way of enjoying these great comic book stories. Issue #56 has the Living Pharaoh, #57 the start of an awesome Sentinel trilogy, #58 offers the first appearance of Havok, #59 has Cyclops as the last X-Man standing against the Sentinels, Issues #60-62 offers the Sauron trilogy, which gets the X-Men back to the Savage Land and a meeting with Ka-Zar, #63 is a nice Magneto story (picking up on the Steranko bit of the devil having a daughter), and #64 is admittedly a lame monster story.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 5, 2004
Seriously, what were they thinking when they gave the coloring job on this the green light? For those who love great artwork in comics, this short run by Neal Adams on X-Men in the late 60's is really one of the highlights. So why would Marvel treat it so poorly? One reviewer mentioned the previous print job as being worse but I disagree. This is a mess; costumes change color from page to page, some pages are flat, saturated color while others are dot printed (which looks far worse on high grade paper than on newsprint!). I also hope they give this a third, improved printing. For those of you who can't wait, the great artwork is still there, it's just buried under an inept rush-job. Personally, I would've prefered the thing in b&w.
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