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Nebula Award Stories 1965 Hardcover – January 1, 1966


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 299 pages
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (1966)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000O3OAC2
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,533,054 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By . on February 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
This anthology represents the FIRST set of Nebula award winners (from 1965) and features that year's winners as well as honorable mentions in the areas of short story, novella, and novellete. This particular collection features some very well known sci-fi authors such as Gordon Dickson, Harlen Ellison, J.G. Ballard, Brian Aldis, Larry Niven and 2 stories by Roger Zelanzy. It's overall a decently enjoyable collection but with that list of authors I hoped for a little more classic stuff, whereas I felt most of the stories were a bit better than average. (Granted, the collection is all from a single year, and it can be hard to come up with a lot of stories from a single year that remain classics).

As I said the collection contains 2 of Zelanzy's works - "The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth" & "He Who Shapes." Though I've liked some of Zelanzy's short stories, neither of these ended up totally working for me.... (further they take up over 100+ of the books 250 pages). It doesn't mean either were bad, and I know Zelanzy uses a variety of different themes and some of his stuff may not be as accesible to those not familiar with his style. And Further "He who Shapes" was later developed into a short novel called "The Dream Master" that seems to have had popularity - at least amongst Zelanzy's fans ("The Dream Master" apparently was then later dveloped into the screenplay "Dreamscape").

Perhaps it's a matter of taste...or based mainly on writing style...but I ended up enjoying Brian Aldiss' "The Saliva Tree" probably the most in the collection. Set in late 1800's England, it's very much an obvious ode to H.G. Wells (and Wells is even loosly featured in it), and it also clearly has similarities to H.P.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Higgins on September 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
It could be argued that the New Wave movement in SF in the US started up in 1965, with the publication of quintessential New Wave stories like Ellison's `"Repent, Harlequin ! Said the Ticktockman"' and Zelazny's `The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth'.

Damon Knight, President of the newly formed Science Fiction Writers of America, possessed a quasi-religious devotion to the New Wave prose style. Knight fervently believed that by promoting a sub-group of authors who crafted `speculative fiction', the Literary World would be forced to admit that, far from consisting of frivolous stories about rocket ships and slide rules, SF was a maturing art form whose foremost practitioners were as deserving of praise as Pynchon, Barth, and Vonnegut.

Accordingly, in 1966 the first Nebula Awards were primarily handed out to New Wave authors; those stories (all seeing print in 1965) are represented in this collection.

`The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth' deals superficially with a deep-sea fishing expedition on Venus; the emphasis is on the psychology of the lead character, a `baitman', and his tumultuous relationship with his former wife. `Ticktockman' is a fable about a regimented society and a rebellious Everyman.

While at the time these stories were considered daring and witty expansions of the boundaries of the genre, I suspect that most modern readers will find them contrived and unremarkable.

James H. Schmitz provides `Balanced Ecology', a more conventional SF story in terms of plotting and setting. On a planet that features trees made of a diamond-like substance, two children must defend their farm from a rapacious corporation.
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Format: Paperback
The Nebula Awards were first presented in 1965 as an alternative to the Hugo Awards for the best science fiction novels and short fiction of the year. I am going to talk about how the Nebulas were 'spozed to be-- not always exactly the way they turned out in practice, but how they must have seemed in that early, golden year.

Unlike the Hugos, which are chosen by popular ballot, the Nebulas are chosen by professional ballot by members of the Science Fiction Writers of America (SFWA). In theory, professional writers would be more alert to quality stories that were less popular with the general public. They would be more prone to be receptive to experimental science fiction. They would be less influenced by political wrangling. Well, that was the way it was 'spozed to be.

This brings us to _Nebula Award Stories_, edited by Damon Knight, the first of the annual Nebuala Awards anthologies, with the Award Winners and several runners-up for best stories of 1965. It was an auspicious start. All of the selections were top-drawer stories.

Let us start with the winners. The award for best novella was a tie between Roger Zelazny's "He Who Shapes" (_Amazing_) and Brian W. Aldiss's "The Saliva Tree" (_Fantasy and Science Fiction_)-- two stories with absolutely nothing in common except general excellence of writing. The best novelette award also went to Roger Zelazny for his "The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth" (_F&SF_). And the best short story award went to Harlan Ellison's "'Repent Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" (_Galaxy_). I believe that readers and SFWA writers were sending a message that they were looking for good _short_ stories that year; the Ellison tale also won the Hugo.

"He Who Shapes" is a tragedy.
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