• List Price: $26.95
  • You Save: $11.96 (44%)
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by GENEL and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Neds has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by goHastings
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ****RENTAL**** (One Disc) - 100% PRODUCT GUARANTEE!* Fast shipping on more than 1,000,000 Book , Video, Video Game, Music titles & More! We 100% Guarantee the full functionality of all used and previously viewed(rental) product, except its digital content
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$14.99
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Neds
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Neds

8 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$14.99
$14.99 $7.16
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
$14.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by GENEL and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Neds + The Last Rites of Joe May
Price for both: $29.98

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Product Description

Directed by the acclaimed actor and director Peter Mullan (My Name is Joe, The Magdalene Sisters), NEDS, or so-called Non-Educated Delinquents, takes place in the gritty, savage and often violent world of 1970s Glasgow. On the brink of adolescence, young John McGill is a bright and sensitive boy, eager to learn and full of promise. But the cards are stacked against him. Most of the adults in his life fail him in one way or another. His father is a drunken violent bully and his teachers punishing John for the sins of his older brother, Benny are down on him from the start. With no one willing to give him the chance he desperately needs, John takes to the savage life of the streets with a vengeance. NEDS is not only a story of lost hope, it is a story of survival by any means necessary.

Special Features

  • Deleted Scenes: Baseball, Conversation with Brother

Review

A powerful and personal coming-of-age tale…hard-hitting, shocking and moving. --Time Out Magazine

A raw, bare -knuckled tale of growing up. --The Times

Product Details

  • Actors: Conor McCarron, Mhairi Anderson, Martin Bell
  • Directors: Peter Mullan
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Tribeca
  • DVD Release Date: August 23, 2011
  • Run Time: 134 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004WCSMES
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #148,609 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on August 4, 2011
Format: DVD
The great character actor Peter Mullan has been in a number of terrific films since directing 2002's intense "The Magdalene Sisters." If "NEDS" is any indication, though, he should step behind the camera more often. This gritty, affecting, depressing film is a visceral experience and one of the hardest edged coming-of-age stories you're likely to encounter. NEDS stands for Non Educated Delinquents and the film charts one boy's progression into adulthood on the tumultuous and violent streets of Glasgow during the seventies. It is not an easy story to love, but it is a dramatic powerhouse that you won't soon forget. In an interesting choice, the primary character tends to be thoroughly unlikable--but you always understand him due to the circumstances of his existence. An abusive father, a hoodlum brother, an indifferent school system, an unescapable class division--John McGill can count on nothing but his intellect to extricate himself from his hopeless surroundings. But something always seems to hold him back.

As an isolated loner, John is at the top of his class. Just the very threat of his brother's retribution keeps him safe from the neighborhood toughs. But when his only friend turns away, John finds himself encircled by an unlikely group of new co-horts. Joining a junior gang, John soon starts to embrace a lawlessness and bravado. And as his life veers away from academics into violence, there may be no turning back. All the built up rage and uncertainty manifests itself in shocking and unpleasant ways which might even isolate him from his new buddies. John's descent is both harrowing and sadly realistic, but the film channels an unrelenting hope amidst the hopelessness. Is there any escape?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By nigel p bird on February 23, 2013
Format: DVD
NEDS
Neds - Non Educate Delinquents.
This is a film that looks at a sub-culture that's rooted in the 1970s and onwards, a sub-culture that reflects in some ways the experiences of the down-trodden youth of poor backgrounds the world over from a much broader spectrum of time.
The main character, John McGill, is a young lad who has an auntie who is a journalist in New York and a father who is an abusive, violent drunk.
John's a bright lad with good prospects at school, or at least he would have if his older brother hadn't already queered his pitch. It takes a while for him to show his potential and he manages to stay on the rails for his first 3 years in secondary school.
There's a certain inevitability about the beginning of his decline. He's rejected by a middle class family with whom he makes a link and from there gets mixed up with a bad crowd who act like a plughole to his swirling water.
Time's spent hanging about doing no good. A little fighting. Some snogging. Low level crime. Vandalism... you can imagine the kind of thing.
The violence escalates and John's delicately balances psyche is toppled after a series of events that push him over the edge and he's forced to leave home and shack up in a boiler in one of the local tower-blocks.
There are many things to like about this film.
The setting is wonderfully done. I loved the feel of the seventies and felt that this was about as close to my memory of the time as any modern attempt to recreate the period. It may have used some obvious tricks to help create this illusion, but I reckon it's only the obvious that would work to such good effect.
The violence is tremendously handled. I wouldn't usually comment on such things, but it really works.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Kerjman on December 10, 2012
Format: DVD
A next story of gray British commoners' daily routine when good boy is pressed by peers to be rude, sexist and offensive -with body-harming off hands and ambiguous ending.

I hardly know what was the most highlighted-stupidity or ignorance of so-called egocentrics towards everything and everyone as the final stills provided?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on August 26, 2011
Format: Amazon Instant Video
The great character actor Peter Mullan has been in a number of terrific films since directing 2002's intense "The Magdalene Sisters." If "NEDS" is any indication, though, he should step behind the camera more often. This gritty, affecting, depressing film is a visceral experience and one of the hardest edged coming-of-age stories you're likely to encounter. NEDS stands for Non Educated Delinquents and the film charts one boy's progression into adulthood on the tumultuous and violent streets of Glasgow during the seventies. It is not an easy story to love, but it is a dramatic powerhouse that you won't soon forget. In an interesting choice, the primary character tends to be thoroughly unlikable--but you always understand him due to the circumstances of his existence. An abusive father, a hoodlum brother, an indifferent school system, an unescapable class division--John McGill can count on nothing but his intellect to extricate himself from his hopeless surroundings. But something always seems to hold him back.

As an isolated loner, John is at the top of his class. Just the very threat of his brother's retribution keeps him safe from the neighborhood toughs. But when his only friend turns away, John finds himself encircled by an unlikely group of new co-horts. Joining a junior gang, John soon starts to embrace a lawlessness and bravado. And as his life veers away from academics into violence, there may be no turning back. All the built up rage and uncertainty manifests itself in shocking and unpleasant ways which might even isolate him from his new buddies. John's descent is both harrowing and sadly realistic, but the film channels an unrelenting hope amidst the hopelessness. Is there any escape?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?