Buy Used
$4.00
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Needles: A Memoir of Growing Up with Diabetes Hardcover – October 5, 1998


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, October 5, 1998
$6.11 $0.01

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (October 5, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684842327
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684842325
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,052,061 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

As the title suggests, the author is graphically frank about the medical necessities of living with juvenile-onset diabetes, and squeamish readers may find her memoir harrowing. In its essence, however, this is a story of emotional growth and healing. Diagnosed at 9 by her older sister Denise, who is herself a diabetic, Andie Dominick spends her adolescence rebelling against her condition: "dieting" by skipping shots, undergoing a dangerous abortion at 17. When, at 21, Andie discovers 33-year-old Denise dead in the house they share, she begins to reexamine the reckless lifestyle that killed her sister and threatens her as well. The discovery three years later that she has diabetic retinopathy, which could lead to blindness, helps Dominick realize she cannot follow her sister's path: "Denise always told me having the disease didn't have to change my life. But now it has ... because I am finally facing who I am." Love and eventually marriage continue Dominick's process of self-knowledge and acceptance, though there is no facile happy ending. (She has a tubal ligation rather than risk passing diabetes to another generation.) Dominick's deliberately plain prose and gritty candor render her struggle accessible and real. --Wendy Smith

From School Library Journal

YA-The story of one family's experience coping with disease. Andie knew all about needles because her older sister Denise was diabetic and she used them daily for insulin shots. As young children, Andie and her brother picked the used ones out of the trash and played with them. Then, when the author was nine, she herself was diagnosed as diabetic and the games were over. Needles became the instruments she needed to manage her life, literally and figuratively. She learned what powerful instruments they could be when, at 21, she found her sister dead as a result of neglect and self-abuse. The story is not a pretty one, but it does illustrate the control one has over some of life's seemingly uncontrollable situations. This fact is important for teens to learn and understand. Dominick, who was about 26-years-old when she wrote this book, relates her experience in a way that will appeal to young adults.
Pamela B. Rearden, Centreville Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1
See all 20 customer reviews
I was afraid of the needles until I read this book!
Amazon Customer
Andie's story displays diabetes as the ruthless, debilitating, ultimately fatal disease it is.
carolyn davies
I was thoroughly impressed by Ms Dominick's account of a lifetime with diabetes.
Nick (oneye@bright.net)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Tony Phillips on May 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
I have spent most of my life growing up with diabetes. It really is refreshing to find a book that deals with the disorder the way having it really is,especially the social and psychological aspects as opposed to the sappy, "feel-good" stories in books like Mazur's "The Dinosaur Tamer", and others like it. Yes, some of those stories for kids are alright, but most want to pretend growing up different hurts less than it really does, and glosses over the course gutter language many pre-teens actually use. I was repeatedly called "dope-head" by cruel peers on the schoolyard, and this is the first book I've read that really deals with the issue of being harassed because of a chronic ailment. I was told that telling classmates about my diabetes would help them be reponsible in case an emergency. If just my friends knew, this might have been the case, but my fourth-grade teacher made a show of telling the whole class just like in this book. The author certainly doesn't steer away from relating the other unpleasant aspects of diabetes itself in her adult and teen years. This is dark, dark reading, folks! It's far different from the book I was given in the hospital that tried to convince me that urine testing was fun, and that needles hut "just a little bit".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Nick (oneye@bright.net) on December 17, 1998
Format: Hardcover
"Needles" is an amazing book. Being a diabetic for nearly 26 of my 29 years, I was certain that the last thing I would want to read about was diabetes. Ms Dominick blew me away! I was emotionally touched by the personal, familial aspects of the book. The whole sister-sister relationship/bond was quite profoundly moving for me. In addition to the emotional reaction, I found myself wondering at times if the author knew something of my childhood/adulthood with diabetes. I often saw myself in the pages of this book. I suspect that many diabetics would say the same.
I was thoroughly impressed by Ms Dominick's account of a lifetime with diabetes. It was not soft-pedaled and was presented realistically. People on "the outside" can nonchalantly say that this disease is controllable and therefore not a big deal. I applaud Ms Dominick for telling the truth about it and telling it so eloquently.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Angie Ables on March 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
A truly wonderful book! I also grew up with juvenile diabetes and it was wonderful to read about a young woman who has come to terms with her illness. The author does not sugar coat living with diabetes and its complications and with every page the author's joys and heartaches are felt. This book would be wonderful for someone who has or knows and loves someone with diabetes. A book that is hard to put down and is a definite keeper!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is written by a young woman who was diagnosed with juvenile onset diabetes at the age of 9. She knew alot about the disease because her sister had it, as did older uncles and aunts. One of her childhood games was giving her dolls insulin shots using her sister's discarded needles. This memoir describes the symptoms that pointed out that she, too, had diabetes; her family's reaction; and, in most detail, her own ways of coping with diabetes. In her description, it's evident that she failed to adhere to basic preventive measures. The beauty of her writing is that she conveys the reckless way she managed diabetes honestly, with no overlay of judgment. She wastes no time on "If only I knew then what I know now." And she describes the painful episodes that led her to accept that she was diabetic (after dealing with it haphazardly for 15 years), and that she could manage the disease instead of letting it run her life. This book shows great insight into the psychology of coping with a chronic disease. It should be of interest to diabetics, anyone else dealing with a chronic disease, endocrinologists as well as non-specialist medical practitioners, and anyone interested in women's health issues. The author is an accomplished writer. I'm looking forward to reading anything else she produces, even if it's not autobiographic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By carolyn davies on October 9, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Having a daughter with diabetes I was quite familiar with some of the experiences that the writer shares with her readers. Andie's insights and honesty are at times mindnumbing but necessary reading for any parent who has a young maturing child who is a diabetic. This book is up close and personal. It is not a fairy tale and at times is breathtakingly emotional. Andie's story displays diabetes as the ruthless, debilitating, ultimately fatal disease it is. This book clarifies the many reasons why people who are diabetic often act or feel the way they do. I think it would be an especially good book for those health care professionals who are in a postition of caring for diabetics, to read. As a person who is so close to the disease and affected every minute of every day by it, I praise and laud Andie for her heartfelt honesty and courage in writing such a clear view into the world of being a diabetic. I look forward to more writings from this very talented author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Scott Strumello on February 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
In all, Needles was a good memoir of living life with Type 1 diabetes. If you're looking for a happy, positive story about living with a chronic condition, this probably isn't for you, but the other 99% of books on diabetes are usually full of advice (though not necessarily practical) on that subject. What this book does, however, is shows one person's real experience with living with diabetes, which isn't always as great as the medical professionals would have everyone believe. Andie Dominick is a good author and helps provide a perspective that is noticably absent from the field of publishing on diabetes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search