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Negotiating Rationally Hardcover – January 30, 1992

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Editorial Reviews

Review

James Ramsey President, James Ramsey & Associates This book offers tremendous insight on the negotiation process. Bazerman and Neale have not only written about theory, but made it applicable in the real world.

About the Author

Max H. Bazerman is the J. J. Gerber Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations and Margaret A. Neale is the H. L. and Helen Kellogg Distinguished Professor of Dispute Resolution and Organizations at the J. L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. They are co-authors of Cognition and Rationality in Negotiation (Free Press, 1991).
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press (January 30, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0029019850
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029019856
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #941,038 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
The review by Payne from Thunderbird appearing in this website is too harsh. Bazerman's strength as a negotiation author comes from his background in decision-making. This book does an excellent job of laying out the cognitive aspect of negotiations (far better than Raiffa's classic, for example). Admittedly, the book may be a bit simplistic to be the primary reading in a rigorous MBA course, but it is a good supplement and of great value for the executive or professional who is several years or more removed from his or her schooling.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Robert Knox on May 21, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Absolutely excellent! Read it 3 times, highlighted important information on nearly every page. Now I refer back to it and study it prior to any important negotiations. In chapter 1 (on page 2!), Bazerman outlines negotiating strategy and seven methods for improving one's negotiating skills. The next 7 chapters systematically address each principle in clear and concise detail. It's a must read book. (It even has some very interesting facts about home buying or selling.)
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Joe Hepworth on November 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
Negotiating Rationally seemes promising but falls short. It provides food for thought on the interface between distributive and integrative bargaining and on biases that get in the way of a good solution. But as a framework for negotiation, Negotiating Rationally is inadequate. Getting to Yes is a far better structure and is easier to understand -- both for the novice and the experienced negotiator.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nese ISIK on February 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Negotiation is central to my business, and I believe for many people as well.

After reading several books on the subject, "Negotiating Rationally" outperformed my expectations.

"Rationally" is the keyword most of us lack in negotiations and we are trapped in several humanely biases just to get the deal done. These biases include: the tendency to irrationally escalate commitment to a previously chosen strategy, the mythical fixed-pie, anchoring & adjustment, the framing of the negotiation, the winner's curse, overconfidence, etc. The book has several examples of previous negotiations, the mistakes and the wisdom to learn from all this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doktor Faustus on December 1, 2012
Format: Paperback
"Negotiating Rationally" by Max Bazerman and Margaret Neale is a good introduction to rationality in negotiation, but lacks the level of depth most readers would like.

The book breaks down into three parts: common negotiation fallacies, a framework for negotiation, and complex negotiations. The first section on negotiation fallacies is the best; in it Bazerman and Neale discuss ideas (with some influence from psychology) such as the confidence fallacy, anchoring, the winner's curse, and the availability of information. The ideas are well-illustrated with many real-world examples. Even better, the right amount is written about each one. By the end of each chapter I had learned a lot but was ready to move on.

The next two sections, on a framework for negotiation and complex negotiations, seem to reiterate the previous fallacies without giving new ideas. The solutions they recommend are mind-numbingly obvious applications of section one; ie people tend to be overconfident, so remember to assess whether you are being overconfident. These ideas are not just explained with examples but over-explained. The complex negotiations section has too much information about the same points. The author would have been better off explaining more of the intricacies and nuance of the fallacies rather than simply reiterating their meaning. An example: the chapter on "negotiating through action" (which I don't believe is a topic different from the rest of the book) supports a point by citing four examples, using three pages to explain them. One example would have been sufficient.

Bazerman and Neale do a decent job introducing rational negotiation. The ideas in the book (much of which is game theory put in less theoretical terms) are valuable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angela on May 27, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The authors' analysis of relevant case studies, which included several high profile business transactions, was very effective in illustrating the use or lack thereof, of key negotiation principles.
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By Edmund V. Faggioli on August 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
If you really want to study negotiation, this book teaches you how to adjust your adjust your perception to be far more effective in decisions and negotiating. So many people need this advice which makes it important to learn! It allows you to understand how people think when they make poor decisions and analysis. After reading this I found myself saying, "What information did you use to make that assessment?" This is really great for the serious and humble negotiating student.
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Format: Paperback
This books provides a good starting point to improve negotiation skills. Some basic theory on distributive and integrative negotiation helps in framing the opportunities and traps occurring during negotiation. The book is easy to read, and it is a useful tool for beginners
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