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Negotiations 1972-1990 Paperback – April 15, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: European Perspectives: A Series in Social Thought and Cultural Criticism
  • Paperback: 221 pages
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press (April 15, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0231075812
  • ISBN-13: 978-0231075817
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #621,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Deleuze (What Is Philosophy?, LJ 4/15/94) is not only one of the most influential of recent French philosophers but one of the most wide-ranging as well. The present volume, which consists mostly of interviews but also includes a few essays, describes his recent concerns. Deleuze gained attention with Anti-Oedipus (LJ 6/1/77), a radical criticism of psychoanalysis, written together with Felix Guattari. After an account of this work, Deleuze discusses his long collaboration with Guattari. Deleuze then shifts gears, and his analysis of the cinema, based on the philosophy of Henri Bergson, occupies center-stage. Deleuze's discussion of Michel Foucault (1926-84), a close friend, comes next; and the book concludes with a discussion of power in society, a main theme of Foucault's work. However diverse his interests, Deleuze has always remained a philosopher in the strict sense. The section of Deleuze's latest work that covers the history of philosophy, focusing on Leibniz, brings out this aspect of his thought. Recommended for academic libraries.?David Gordon, Bowling Green State Univ., Ohio
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

What unfolds...is the passion of [Deleuze's] ideas and commitments as well as the dazzling originality of his work.

(Dorothea E. Olkowski International Studies in Philosophy)

Negotiations is perhaps the best short introduction to the thought of one of France's three most influential poststructuralist philosophers, Gilles Deleuze.

(Choice)

No one knows what distant posterity will remember of a body of work that contemporaries probably understand only a little. Thought, with Deleuze, is the experience of life rather than reason.

(La Monde)

Deleuze is not only on of the most influential of recent French philosophers but one of the most wide-ranging as well. The present volume, which consists mostly of interviews but also includes a few essays, describes his recent concerns. Deleuze gained attention with Anti-Oedipus (LJ 6/1/77), a radical criticism of psychoanalysis, written together with Flix Guattari. After an account of this work, Deleuze discusses his long collaboration with Guattari. Deleuze then shifts gears, and his analysis of the cinema, based on the philosophy of Henri Bergson, occupies center-stage. Deleuze's discussion of Michel Foucault (1926-84), a close friend, comes next; and the book concludes with a discussion of power in society, a main theme of Foucault's work. However diverse his interests, Deleuze has always remained a philosopher in the strict sense. The section of Deleuze's latest work that covers the history of philosophy, focusing on Leibniz, brings out this aspect of his thought. Recommended for academic libraries.

(Library Journal)

More About the Author

Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995) was professor of philosophy at the University of Paris, Vincennes-St. Denis. He coauthored Anti-Oedipus and A Thousand Plateaus with Félix Guattari. These works, as well as Cinema 1, Cinema 2, The Fold, Proust and Signs, and others, are published in English by Minnesota.

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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By m_armintor on August 29, 1998
Format: Paperback
In the intervening years since Deleuze's death, Columbia University Press has turned out translations of the all the material Deleuze had published during his lifetime. Negotiations is a translation of Pourparles, published by Minuit at the beginning of this decade, shortly before Qu'est-ce que c'est la philosophie, and the death of his collaborator Felix Guattari. Like the latter work, Negotiations appears to be a kind of summation of Deleuze's work and also an introduction for the uninitiated. Why does Deleuze need introducing, then? It may be useful to draw a parallel between Foucault and Deleuze, contemporaries often considered together in the discussion of poststructuralist theory. The differences between them are largely matters of style, if one takes Deleuze at his word: in this collection he asserts that like Foucault and Lyotard, his aim with Anti-Oedipus was to turn over the despot of the signifier (21). But unlike Foucault and Lyotard, Deleuze's implicit rejection of structuralism scuttled his chances of winning as wide an American audience as Derrida and especially Foucault, whose work depends heavily of Saussurean distinction between signifier and signified. More to the point, Deleuze's relative obscurity in the Anglophone world is due mainly to two things: first, to the alien diffuseness of his project particularly in A Thousand Plateaus, advertised in other writings as "transcendental empiricism," which dismantles ontology, subjectivity, and any constructed conception of the human subject in favor of analyzing insects, wolves, and lobsters for clues to a picture of reality: second, to the mind-bending style Deleuze and Guattari employed in Capitalism and Schizophrenia, preventing all but the hardiest readers from getting a grasp on their thought.Read more ›
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "yogsothoth666" on May 31, 2003
Format: Paperback
These interviews are for the most part accessible to anyone (excepting the one with Negri who is a special case). They describe what Deleuze was trying to do with his books better than most commentators. Though they remain mere introductions to his thought, if you're trying to wrap your skull around postmodernism, there are worse places to start.
We learn pretty valuable things about Deleuze from Deleuze. His attitude towards the sciences and mathematics was plainly not anti-science. Deleuze saw the creative arts and the sciences as distinct domains. And they usually are, in geography at minimum. He figured philosophy's job was to mediate between these two forms of life. (Much like how the blacksmith is the mediator between civilization and primitive societies in A Thousand Plateaus.) So he enjoyed taking theorems of math and showing how they mapped onto movies and showing how paintings illustrated physics. He probably would have succeeded if he hadn't written in his infamously opaque stream-of-consciousness style. As it is the scientists got all hostile because they couldn't understand him like an article in Scientific American. (And you know who you are.) Since the scientists were hostile, the artists produced "science studies," wherein they study rheotric designed to cover up that they don't know science.
Even thought the arts and sciences are perhaps in greater disagreement today than ever, the twentieth century does remain, as Foucault said, "Deleuzian."
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By TenaciousPhilosopher on October 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
As my Ph.D is on Deleuze, perhaps I am not the most objective reviewer, but this is an excellent supplement to the ideas of Deleuze. It is in his interviews and short pieces between his major works that Deleuze's most striking ideas come out, and anything he says without Guattari is on incredible value.
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