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Negro Comrades of the Crown: African Americans and the British Empire Fight the U.S. Before Emancipation Hardcover – February 1, 2012


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Negro Comrades of the Crown: African Americans and the British Empire Fight the U.S. Before Emancipation + Black and Brown: African Americans and the Mexican Revolution, 1910-1920 (American History and Culture Series)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 365 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (February 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814773494
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814773499
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,050,792 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Now that the old feudal order is experiencing a resurgence with the assistance of wealth, a corporate media and official historians, Gerald Horne, one of our most original historians, reminds us of the alliance of Africans, Europeans and Native Americans that fought against its antecedent anachronism. In this brilliant, stunning book, Horne shows us how the issue of slavery still intrudes upon our national discussions."
-Ishmael Reed,John D. MacArthur Fellow

"Highly recommended."-J.R. Wendland,CHOICE

"Horne’s work provides readers with a new framework to imagine diplomatic relationships between world powers in the nineteenth century, something especially important as historians begin to blend racial, cultural, and social history with diplomatic history in an effort to globalize American history... Horne’s meticulously researched monograph will provoke thought and discussion on the relationship between the peculiar institution and diplomacy in this important and growing field of study."-H-Net Reviews,

"Gerald Horne's book is a tribute to the international struggle of Africans for human dignity. It also reveals the unstated fears and unearths the historical justification in the souls of white folks--recognizing the institutional silence that this book aims to pierce."-Black Agenda Report,

"Although not the easiest read, Horne's book is a valuable contribution on a subject of profound interest and significance." -Journal of American History,

About the Author

Gerald Horne is Moores Professor of History and African-American Studies at the University of Houston. His books include Race Woman: The Lives of Shirley Graham Du Bois and Race War!: White Supremacy and the Japanese Attack on the British Empire (both available from NYU Press).


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By IcebergSlim on January 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In 1938 C. L. R. James published Black Jacobins--as he wrote at the time--with the explicit aim of demonstrating that Africans in the Western hemisphere had not only been victims of slavery but also agents of their own liberation. Moreover, his narrative was constructed consciously to address the struggle against colonialism in Africa itself.

James chose the history of the Haitian revolution for a number of reasons, one of which was its exemplary impact on the consciousness of the African Diaspora.

In 1965, Malcolm X reiterated--e.g. in his Oxford Union speech--that Black nationalism was not a parochial response to white racism but the recognition that it was nationalism which had given strength to every movement to oppose colonial oppression of which slavery and racism had been integral parts. Especially in numerous interviews and speeches after his return from Mecca, Malcolm X saw that the question of liberation "for human beings" is an international struggle. However specific the local characteristics of oppression might be, consciousness of the history and dynamics of that struggle are essential for attaining human liberty anywhere.

Gerald Horne recovers the necessary and hitherto concealed historical background to support the argument ventured by James and polemicized by Malcolm X. His latest book, Negro Comrades of the Crown, begins with what white historians would no doubt consider an anachronistic view among Africans, namely that the great independence declaration of 1776 should be seen as an expression of the same spirit inherent in Ian Smith's UDI in 1965 and not as an Enlightenment relative to the Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mari-Djata on November 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
Short Summary: With the Haitian Revolution, insurrectionary sentiments among slaveholding Bermudian colonists, and the ever annoying yapping of the new and independent republic of the "United States of America" (along with their covetous eyes gazing towards Canada), the English empire knew that it would have to do something drastic to keep their dominance over its far-flung Western landholdings. Something drastic like changing their policies from being the king of the slave trade to becoming the stronghold of abolitionism. Angling to obtain the favor of both the newest republic in the world, Haiti, along with those of their own Black subjects and the enslaved of the US, England politicked itself away from becoming a target for overthrow and being kicked out of the region like the major French colony of Hispaniola. It also was able to keep its white subjects in line via threatening them with becoming another Haiti as well as striking fear in the hearts of the US by arming Africans and regarding them as humans.

This book was so thorough. There aren't many well researched or documented books on this subject and Dr. Gerald Horne is extremely good at uncovering aspects of history while backing up the thesis with copious -outrageous amounts even- of documentation. You will not learn this in school if you are stuck in the United States educational system.

Except to bit nitpicking, I really could not find too many flaws in this book. So, to be nitpicking, here are some: I would have liked a very short summary of the time when England was the very head of the slave trade. Northing big, just to ensure the audience that we aren't talking about boy scouts when describing England's foray into African history. Next, I would have liked it if Dr.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Burns on August 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found it very enlightening, and a different take on American history NOT told in schools 'Black Redcoats' ? I don't recalled that in class, (wonder why) anyway good book. Only thing, i did feel that there was an OVERUSE of 'Jargon words' that took away from the stories being told, good that I have a KINDLE to help with the definitions.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By L. Hanif on April 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book gives good info on the war of 1812 and the relationship that black people had in it. You kind of get the feeling of, "no wonder we don't hear much about this war."

However, the writing should have been better, in my opinion, so that you can follow it better.
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