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Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906 Paperback – June 1, 2002


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Negrophobia: A Race Riot in Atlanta, 1906 + Yankee Merchants and the Making of the Urban West: The Rise and Fall of Antebellum St. Louis (Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Modern History) + New York, Chicago, Los Angeles: America's Global Cities
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Encounter Books (June 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1893554546
  • ISBN-13: 978-1893554542
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,066,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...Mark Bauerlein has fashioned a riveting account of the Atlanta riots of 1906 that...demonstrates the abiding power of narrative history." -- Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eugene D. Genovese --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Mark Bauerlein

More About the Author

Mark Bauerlein is a professor of English at Emory University and has worked as a director of Research and Analysis at the National Endowment for the Arts, where he oversaw studies about culture and American life, including the much discussed Reading at Risk: A Survey of Literary Reading in America. His writing has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, The Weekly Standard, Reason magazine, and The Chronicle of Higher Education, among many other publications and scholarly periodicals. A frequent lecturer, he has been called one of the Independent Women's Forum's "favorite intellectuals," and has been praised by columnist George Will as "dazzling."

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Todd Bartholomew TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 8, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Scrupulously researched and well written "Negrophobia" is a gripping recount of the events prior to, during, and after Atlanta's 1906 Race Riot; a long neglected chapter of Atlanta's history. Bauerlein does an outstanding job of putting that era in context, especially the events in Georgia and Atlanta that led to, and created the environment for the riot. The race-baiting gubernatorial election of 1906, the rampant yellow journalism hyping black-on-white violence, and Thomas Dixon's "The Klansman" all play a part in creating the toxic brew. Bauerlein thankfully includes a Dramatis Personae at the front of the book so readers can keep central historical figures easily identifiable. The action is broken into four logically titled components: Prelude, Riot, Aftermath, and Epilogue. This simple elegant construction serves the native well, recreating the Atlanta of 1906, setting the riot in motion, and speaking of its aftermath. Bauerlein wisely lets the principals speak in their own words and betrays no bias towards or against anyone or anything, remaining a neutral voice leaving the reader to draw their own conclusions. Buerlein is unsparing in his recounting the events of the riot in a way that can send chills down your spine and this book isn't for faint-hearts, yet is not needlessly gory. The book fairly crackles with energy and drama but those easily offended by racism would best avoid it as Bauerlein doesn't shy away from exploring and explaining it. I immensely enjoyed this book and can't help but praise Bauerlein's writing and scrupulous research.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bedivere Jones on July 23, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is an objective historical account, but I couldn't help thinking as I read it: "What a great story!" It has all the makings of a really good potboiler - an unexpected treat for such serious subjects.
As for the matters of race, anyone who wants to read about how people really experienced race relations on the ground and in their daily lives should read this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is a sharp, erudite, and very readable account of Atlanta's turbulent racial politics in 1906. But it is also much more than a historical study of a single year. Mark Bauerlein has produced an impressive analysis of black intellectual history at the turn of the century. His observations are precise, and his reconstruction of events vivid. I recommend this book highly.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For people interested in the 1906 Atlanta Race Riot--long ignored by the city "too busy to hate"-- I recommend this book. It has an excellent, comprehensive account of the political exploitation, racism, and sexual hysteria leading up to the riot. Where other books only mention the post-riot political consequences and machinations, Bauerlein goes into much detail. Like other writers, however, he does not devote enough space to the lives of the black victims after the riot. What exactly happened to the survivors who remained in the city? What was their relationship with their white employers after the riot? What do the children of the victims (except for the relatives of Walter White) have to say about the effect on their families? As documentation of a shameful event in the history of Atlanta, the south, and the U. S., however, Negrophobia is well worth the read.
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