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Neighboring Sounds [Blu-ray]

7 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

A palpable sense of unease hangs over a single city block in the coastal town of Recife, Brazil. Home to prosperous families and the servants who work for them, the area is ruled by an aging patriarch and his sons. When a private security firm is reluctantly brought in to protect the residents from a recent spate of petty crime, it unleashes the fears, anxieties and resentments of a divided society still haunted by its troubled past. Kleber Mendon‡a Filho's Neighboring Sounds is a thrilling debut by a major new voice in world cinema.

Review

"This isn't merely the best new movie I've seen this year, it may well be the best Brazilian movie since the 1970s." --John Powers, Vogue

"A revelatory debut feature." --A.O. Scott, The New York Times

"A thoroughly modern, film-savvy opus steeped equally in dread and humor." --Dennis Lim, Artforum

"A revelatory debut feature." --A.O. Scott, The New York Times

"A thoroughly modern, film-savvy opus steeped equally in dread and humor." --Dennis Lim, Artforum

Product Details

  • Actors: Irma Brown, Sebastian Formiga, Gustavo Jahn, Maeve Jinkings, Irandhir Santos
  • Directors: Kleber Mendonca Filho
  • Format: Anamorphic, Blu-ray, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Subtitled, Surround Sound, Widescreen
  • Language: Portuguese
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Cinema Guild
  • DVD Release Date: May 21, 2013
  • Run Time: 131 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00BL7TPYI
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #110,100 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Dooley TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 29, 2013
Format: DVD
This is the debut feature length film from Brazilian film maker Kleber Mendonça Filho, who has made a film that is so subtle in approach to the issues it deals with, that you are going to love it or hate it. Original title was "O Som ao Redor" and it opens in black and white with scenes of poor field workers sweating for a pittance in the fields in the countryside, this then morphs to a girl on roller blades enjoying herself in an upper class urbanisation, and in colour. Then we are confronted with a `nice' residence in Recife, Eastern Brazil, where the affluent residents are suffering from a mini crime wave.

The `action' is predominantly shown by the noises emanating from parts of the street. We have a dog that never shuts up, vacuum cleaners car screeches and all the urban rumble with intense happenings closer to home. So a security firm is hired and the neighbours soon all chip in to hire their services. Brazil is a have and have not society where the poor are very poor indeed and the rich don't want them near them except to do the jobs they don't like - much like here actually. A lot of Brazilian films take place in those crime infested areas like the favellas but this is how the other half live. We have a water delivery guy who supplies a bit more than H2O, a couple who are happy to copulate in front of `the help' and a local don type who doesn't mind swimming with sharks, to name but a few.

It is layered but all comes together in the central themes of inequity, insecurity and crime in a very split society. The need to protect what is yours also leads people to being more isolated and at times it has the feeling of claustrophobia. The security guards are also not what they seem and all is set up for a very intriguing ending.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Eric M. Eiserloh on May 22, 2013
Format: DVD
Wow, what an amazing film!

While this movie plays like a slice of life drama in a neighborhood in Recife, every single scene is carefully and meaningfully put together to speak about the nature of social structures in Brazil which date back to plantation times.

These things may be more discernible in Northeastern states like Pernambuco where the plantations once flourished, formed the basis of the societal constructs and defined human relationships, but their residue still permeates the country as a whole, which, while trying to move beyond them, still remains mired in the same kind of stratifications.

The film opens with black and white pictures of a plantation and then segues into a drama in 3 acts, using a crisscrossing narrative that delves into the day to day lives of various people who live and work on same street. And through their interactions and involvements we are given a very clear picture of class system as microcosm.

This film is more than a simple slice of life. For those of you familiar with the films of Lucrecia Martel (Argentina), what seems to be disconnected and inconsequential is put together like a jigsaw puzzle that leads brilliantly to the films final scene, at which point the entire story crystallizes before our very eyes, and we realize how well it has been supported and enriched by all we have been shown.

I thought the script was particularly brilliant in that "natural," daily life scenes end up speaking volumes in the end, although perhaps they were more resonant for me since I just spent time in Brazil. It's one of those films where you know something is about to happen, but you're not sure what or with whom until it does.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephen C. Rife on July 28, 2013
Format: DVD
Set in a middle class high-rise in the Brazilian city of Recife, this extraordinary debut feature by former film critic Kleber Mendonça Filho is a voyeuristic tour-de-force; rich in humor, domestic life, class and character drama, private and public pleasure, ambiguity (though the narrative is significantly less ambiguous than many claim), and a unique, driving undercurrent of anxiety. The connection between this Polanski-esque dread and the favendas (plantations) and engenhos (sugar mills) of Brazil's past is established in a black and white montage that opens the film, accompanied by a heart-like, low register beat that continues throughout, pressing against the high-rise's mundane action, tenuous security, and bourgeois delights. The percussive, spare scoring (provided by DJ Dolores, following Filho's request for something "more than noise but less than music" ) punctuates and anticipates several extremely effective smash-cuts, and generates an uneasy yet engaging atmosphere, culminating in a child's nightmare that is among the best dream sequences I've seen, ranking with the rape/rescue dream in The Bitter Tea of General Yen (d. Frank Capra, 1933), Dr. Borg's nightmare of an empty street in Wild Strawberries (d. Ingmar Bergman, 1957), and Rosemary's dream eliding the memory of a nun with sounds of her neighbor through her bedroom's thin wall in Rosemary's Baby (d. Roman Polanski, 1968). The finale is duly satisfying as its Marxist dimension, though never didactic, has been in evidence for nearly two hours without taking so direct and horrific a form.Read more ›
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