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Neil Sedaka

 
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All MP3 Downloads by Neil Sedaka
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1-10 of 655
  Song Title Album
Time
 
Laughter In The Rain The Definitive Collection
2:50
The First Noel The Miracle of Christmas
1:56
Bad Blood The Definitive Collection
3:09
Breaking Up Is Hard To Do (Slow) The Definitive Collection
3:17
Breaking Up is Hard to Do Doo Wop Golden Oldies Vol. 1
2:20
The Immigrant The Definitive Collection
3:46
Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen: The Best of Neil Sedaka
2:33
Calendar Girl The Definitive Collection
2:39
Calendar Girl (2001 Remastered) The Very Best Of Neil Sedaka
2:39
Oh Carol Best of Rock 'n' Roll (Greatest Originals from the 50s & 60s)
2:16

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The songs of the 1960's were very happy, very positive, perhaps a little naive, but you can under stand all the lyrics. - Neil Sedaka


At a Glance

Birthname: Neil Sedaka
Nationality: American
Born: Mar 13 1939


Biography

The legendary Neil Sedaka is best known as one of the first superstars from the Brill Building, an extraordinary singer/songwriter and a constant in a very fickle industry. If you were to play “Six Degrees of Separation” with the name Neil Sedaka, and didn’t connect him to Elton John, 10CC, John Lennon, The Carpenters and Ben Folds, then you wouldn’t get too far. His extensive career found its way in to the milieu of the above-mentioned artists in addition to Elvis, Shirley Bassey, Clay Aiken and countless others.

Sedaka has chosen 2010 to release his first new studio album in 10 years, The ... Read more

The legendary Neil Sedaka is best known as one of the first superstars from the Brill Building, an extraordinary singer/songwriter and a constant in a very fickle industry. If you were to play “Six Degrees of Separation” with the name Neil Sedaka, and didn’t connect him to Elton John, 10CC, John Lennon, The Carpenters and Ben Folds, then you wouldn’t get too far. His extensive career found its way in to the milieu of the above-mentioned artists in addition to Elvis, Shirley Bassey, Clay Aiken and countless others.

Sedaka has chosen 2010 to release his first new studio album in 10 years, The Music of My Life, out January 19th (Razor & Tie). A return to his pop roots, this is Sedaka’s 47th release, an astonishing feat in itself. The Music Of My Life highlights musical craftsmanship and a gift for writing melodies and words that stand the test of time. Says Sedaka, “This is my best collection of songs in 57 years of songwriting. It might be my last set of pop songs, as I feel I cannot top these. I am going full circle and returning to my classical roots.”

Recorded over a four-month period, the 12 track treasure that is The Music of my Life could best be described as a musical “tour” though Neil’s life. "I had a great run of creativity. I sat down at the piano and these songs just flowed out of me. This record was written for the people I love; Family and friends.” One listen to Sedaka, still going strong and you wouldn’t really be surprised that his art has touched so many people.

The lead track, “Do You Remember?” has Neil performing in both English and Spanish. Produced by the legendary David Foster, this salsa infused treat is a departure from what he is best known for but will have you up on your feet dancing as you marvel at how easily he can carry this bi-lingual salsa tune. Sings Sedaka in his signature smooth vocal, “Wouldn’t it be wonderful, the way things were then? I would like to turn back time, live it all again.” A very relatable theme, he re-visits the special times that helped shape him in to the person he is today.

Tracks “Music of My Life,” “Searching,” “Waiting” and “How Can I Change Your Mind” are four songs with special meaning for a two-fold reason; all were influenced by Neil’s early years, when he was a scholarship student at Julliard, studying to be a concert pianist. They also all feature renowned conductor/composer Lee Holdridge, who came on board to create the string quartet parts. Says Sedaka, “I was delighted to have the great Lee Holdridge orchestrate these songs. Being a concert pianist studying at Julliard, I played with many piano quintets (2 violin, cello, viola, piano). These four songs were inspired by those I played with as a student. They come from my soul and I am very proud of them.”

A real nod to the Brill Building days that Sedaka was such an integral part of is “A Fool in Love” – a classic Neil track if there ever was one. Sure to be a fan favorite, “it’s a throw back to the rock and roll I know, with the old Sedaka touch to it,” says the songwriter.

The listener’s journey continues on a song that finds Sedaka exploring the Blues, a genre that has always fascinated him, “I’ve always strived for something new, different, and fresh to excite me and my audience. It brings Neil Sedaka to a new level. “Living in a Fantasy” is a perfect example. I have always been interested in the Blues. I am very proud to include this amongst a diverse collection of songs on this album.”

Extraordinarily, the oldest track on The Music of My Life is one Sedaka wrote with his long time collaborator, and fellow Brill co-conspirator, Howard Greenfield when Neil was 16 years old. Sedaka explains that the Doo-Wop gem, “Right or Wrong,” finally deserves to be showcased, “This is the oldest song of the collection. Howard Greenfield and I wrote it when I was 16, and it had never been recorded. It’s a trunk song and I was enchanted by it. My inspiration to do my multiple voices has always been Patti Page, Les Paul, and Mary Ford. I have always loved Doo-Wop. In high school, I originated the group, The Tokens.”

And although he recently celebrated his 50th anniversary in show business, don’t think that Sedaka doesn’t like to challenge himself. Taking himself out his comfort zone brings the sensational “Won’t You Share This Dream of Mine,” a fun piano driven romp. “I see a smoky and dark cocktail lounge in Paris, in the 1940’s. This is the first time I’ve written something of this nature, singing it in a different intimate style.“

The Music of My Life is a musical achievement for many reasons, not the least of which is the history that the man who has written all the music brings to this collection. A child prodigy – and to this day considered a musical genius – Sedaka showed a musical aptitude as early as the second grade. His mother took an extra job to be able to provide her talented son with a piano; he went on to earn a scholarship at the illustrious Julliard School of Music. It was at this time that a 13-year-old Neil began writing songs with his neighbor, Howard Greenfield. By 1958, Sedaka had a #14 hit with “The Diary”; in 1962 he scored the #1 slot with “Breaking Up is Hard to Do.” Between 1960 and 1962, Sedaka had an extraordinary eight Top 10 hits, and recorded songs in Yiddish, Hebrew, Japanese, German, Italian and Spanish.

Continuing his successful trajectory as a songwriter, Sedaka wrote for the Monkees, The 5th Dimension and Frankie Valli among others. The early 70s saw Sedaka, by now an international superstar, back in the studio recording future worldwide hit “Solitaire” with members of 10CC; this track that would go on to be covered by Andy Williams, The Carpenters, Elvis Presley and American Idol Clay Aiken. A year later he wrote one of his biggest hits, “Love Will Keep Us Together,” for his album The Tra-La Days Are Over; two years later, The Captain and Tennille version would go to #1. Sedaka than signed with Elton John’s Rocket Records, where he would top the charts with “Laughter in the Rain” and “Bad Blood,” with John providing backing vocals. Interestingly, the B-Side to the top selling “Laughter in the Rain” was “The Immigrant,” an ode to John Lennon, who was having trouble getting permanent resident status in the United States.

Sedaka has never stopped recording music or touring, receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and even doing a stint as a Guest Judge on American Idol. An inspiration to many, singer Ben Folds credits Sedaka with inspiring him to be a great songwriter. Since Neil had his first song published at the age of 13, Folds set the same goal for himself.

"There are three kinds of songwriting. Intellectual, Emotional, and Spiritual. Intellectual songwriting comes from the subconscious. You work out the music that is already in your head. Spiritual songwriting is when you are chosen by a higher power and you are the vessel in which these songs are produced. Emotional songwriting is when you write based on an event or a crisis. The writing is cathartic and allows you to release any stress. This is where these songs came from."

A true American icon, Neil Sedaka is very thankful for his musical talents. On The Music of My Life, we are grateful he has chosen to share that gift with us once again.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The legendary Neil Sedaka is best known as one of the first superstars from the Brill Building, an extraordinary singer/songwriter and a constant in a very fickle industry. If you were to play “Six Degrees of Separation” with the name Neil Sedaka, and didn’t connect him to Elton John, 10CC, John Lennon, The Carpenters and Ben Folds, then you wouldn’t get too far. His extensive career found its way in to the milieu of the above-mentioned artists in addition to Elvis, Shirley Bassey, Clay Aiken and countless others.

Sedaka has chosen 2010 to release his first new studio album in 10 years, The Music of My Life, out January 19th (Razor & Tie). A return to his pop roots, this is Sedaka’s 47th release, an astonishing feat in itself. The Music Of My Life highlights musical craftsmanship and a gift for writing melodies and words that stand the test of time. Says Sedaka, “This is my best collection of songs in 57 years of songwriting. It might be my last set of pop songs, as I feel I cannot top these. I am going full circle and returning to my classical roots.”

Recorded over a four-month period, the 12 track treasure that is The Music of my Life could best be described as a musical “tour” though Neil’s life. "I had a great run of creativity. I sat down at the piano and these songs just flowed out of me. This record was written for the people I love; Family and friends.” One listen to Sedaka, still going strong and you wouldn’t really be surprised that his art has touched so many people.

The lead track, “Do You Remember?” has Neil performing in both English and Spanish. Produced by the legendary David Foster, this salsa infused treat is a departure from what he is best known for but will have you up on your feet dancing as you marvel at how easily he can carry this bi-lingual salsa tune. Sings Sedaka in his signature smooth vocal, “Wouldn’t it be wonderful, the way things were then? I would like to turn back time, live it all again.” A very relatable theme, he re-visits the special times that helped shape him in to the person he is today.

Tracks “Music of My Life,” “Searching,” “Waiting” and “How Can I Change Your Mind” are four songs with special meaning for a two-fold reason; all were influenced by Neil’s early years, when he was a scholarship student at Julliard, studying to be a concert pianist. They also all feature renowned conductor/composer Lee Holdridge, who came on board to create the string quartet parts. Says Sedaka, “I was delighted to have the great Lee Holdridge orchestrate these songs. Being a concert pianist studying at Julliard, I played with many piano quintets (2 violin, cello, viola, piano). These four songs were inspired by those I played with as a student. They come from my soul and I am very proud of them.”

A real nod to the Brill Building days that Sedaka was such an integral part of is “A Fool in Love” – a classic Neil track if there ever was one. Sure to be a fan favorite, “it’s a throw back to the rock and roll I know, with the old Sedaka touch to it,” says the songwriter.

The listener’s journey continues on a song that finds Sedaka exploring the Blues, a genre that has always fascinated him, “I’ve always strived for something new, different, and fresh to excite me and my audience. It brings Neil Sedaka to a new level. “Living in a Fantasy” is a perfect example. I have always been interested in the Blues. I am very proud to include this amongst a diverse collection of songs on this album.”

Extraordinarily, the oldest track on The Music of My Life is one Sedaka wrote with his long time collaborator, and fellow Brill co-conspirator, Howard Greenfield when Neil was 16 years old. Sedaka explains that the Doo-Wop gem, “Right or Wrong,” finally deserves to be showcased, “This is the oldest song of the collection. Howard Greenfield and I wrote it when I was 16, and it had never been recorded. It’s a trunk song and I was enchanted by it. My inspiration to do my multiple voices has always been Patti Page, Les Paul, and Mary Ford. I have always loved Doo-Wop. In high school, I originated the group, The Tokens.”

And although he recently celebrated his 50th anniversary in show business, don’t think that Sedaka doesn’t like to challenge himself. Taking himself out his comfort zone brings the sensational “Won’t You Share This Dream of Mine,” a fun piano driven romp. “I see a smoky and dark cocktail lounge in Paris, in the 1940’s. This is the first time I’ve written something of this nature, singing it in a different intimate style.“

The Music of My Life is a musical achievement for many reasons, not the least of which is the history that the man who has written all the music brings to this collection. A child prodigy – and to this day considered a musical genius – Sedaka showed a musical aptitude as early as the second grade. His mother took an extra job to be able to provide her talented son with a piano; he went on to earn a scholarship at the illustrious Julliard School of Music. It was at this time that a 13-year-old Neil began writing songs with his neighbor, Howard Greenfield. By 1958, Sedaka had a #14 hit with “The Diary”; in 1962 he scored the #1 slot with “Breaking Up is Hard to Do.” Between 1960 and 1962, Sedaka had an extraordinary eight Top 10 hits, and recorded songs in Yiddish, Hebrew, Japanese, German, Italian and Spanish.

Continuing his successful trajectory as a songwriter, Sedaka wrote for the Monkees, The 5th Dimension and Frankie Valli among others. The early 70s saw Sedaka, by now an international superstar, back in the studio recording future worldwide hit “Solitaire” with members of 10CC; this track that would go on to be covered by Andy Williams, The Carpenters, Elvis Presley and American Idol Clay Aiken. A year later he wrote one of his biggest hits, “Love Will Keep Us Together,” for his album The Tra-La Days Are Over; two years later, The Captain and Tennille version would go to #1. Sedaka than signed with Elton John’s Rocket Records, where he would top the charts with “Laughter in the Rain” and “Bad Blood,” with John providing backing vocals. Interestingly, the B-Side to the top selling “Laughter in the Rain” was “The Immigrant,” an ode to John Lennon, who was having trouble getting permanent resident status in the United States.

Sedaka has never stopped recording music or touring, receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and even doing a stint as a Guest Judge on American Idol. An inspiration to many, singer Ben Folds credits Sedaka with inspiring him to be a great songwriter. Since Neil had his first song published at the age of 13, Folds set the same goal for himself.

"There are three kinds of songwriting. Intellectual, Emotional, and Spiritual. Intellectual songwriting comes from the subconscious. You work out the music that is already in your head. Spiritual songwriting is when you are chosen by a higher power and you are the vessel in which these songs are produced. Emotional songwriting is when you write based on an event or a crisis. The writing is cathartic and allows you to release any stress. This is where these songs came from."

A true American icon, Neil Sedaka is very thankful for his musical talents. On The Music of My Life, we are grateful he has chosen to share that gift with us once again.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

The legendary Neil Sedaka is best known as one of the first superstars from the Brill Building, an extraordinary singer/songwriter and a constant in a very fickle industry. If you were to play “Six Degrees of Separation” with the name Neil Sedaka, and didn’t connect him to Elton John, 10CC, John Lennon, The Carpenters and Ben Folds, then you wouldn’t get too far. His extensive career found its way in to the milieu of the above-mentioned artists in addition to Elvis, Shirley Bassey, Clay Aiken and countless others.

Sedaka has chosen 2010 to release his first new studio album in 10 years, The Music of My Life, out January 19th (Razor & Tie). A return to his pop roots, this is Sedaka’s 47th release, an astonishing feat in itself. The Music Of My Life highlights musical craftsmanship and a gift for writing melodies and words that stand the test of time. Says Sedaka, “This is my best collection of songs in 57 years of songwriting. It might be my last set of pop songs, as I feel I cannot top these. I am going full circle and returning to my classical roots.”

Recorded over a four-month period, the 12 track treasure that is The Music of my Life could best be described as a musical “tour” though Neil’s life. "I had a great run of creativity. I sat down at the piano and these songs just flowed out of me. This record was written for the people I love; Family and friends.” One listen to Sedaka, still going strong and you wouldn’t really be surprised that his art has touched so many people.

The lead track, “Do You Remember?” has Neil performing in both English and Spanish. Produced by the legendary David Foster, this salsa infused treat is a departure from what he is best known for but will have you up on your feet dancing as you marvel at how easily he can carry this bi-lingual salsa tune. Sings Sedaka in his signature smooth vocal, “Wouldn’t it be wonderful, the way things were then? I would like to turn back time, live it all again.” A very relatable theme, he re-visits the special times that helped shape him in to the person he is today.

Tracks “Music of My Life,” “Searching,” “Waiting” and “How Can I Change Your Mind” are four songs with special meaning for a two-fold reason; all were influenced by Neil’s early years, when he was a scholarship student at Julliard, studying to be a concert pianist. They also all feature renowned conductor/composer Lee Holdridge, who came on board to create the string quartet parts. Says Sedaka, “I was delighted to have the great Lee Holdridge orchestrate these songs. Being a concert pianist studying at Julliard, I played with many piano quintets (2 violin, cello, viola, piano). These four songs were inspired by those I played with as a student. They come from my soul and I am very proud of them.”

A real nod to the Brill Building days that Sedaka was such an integral part of is “A Fool in Love” – a classic Neil track if there ever was one. Sure to be a fan favorite, “it’s a throw back to the rock and roll I know, with the old Sedaka touch to it,” says the songwriter.

The listener’s journey continues on a song that finds Sedaka exploring the Blues, a genre that has always fascinated him, “I’ve always strived for something new, different, and fresh to excite me and my audience. It brings Neil Sedaka to a new level. “Living in a Fantasy” is a perfect example. I have always been interested in the Blues. I am very proud to include this amongst a diverse collection of songs on this album.”

Extraordinarily, the oldest track on The Music of My Life is one Sedaka wrote with his long time collaborator, and fellow Brill co-conspirator, Howard Greenfield when Neil was 16 years old. Sedaka explains that the Doo-Wop gem, “Right or Wrong,” finally deserves to be showcased, “This is the oldest song of the collection. Howard Greenfield and I wrote it when I was 16, and it had never been recorded. It’s a trunk song and I was enchanted by it. My inspiration to do my multiple voices has always been Patti Page, Les Paul, and Mary Ford. I have always loved Doo-Wop. In high school, I originated the group, The Tokens.”

And although he recently celebrated his 50th anniversary in show business, don’t think that Sedaka doesn’t like to challenge himself. Taking himself out his comfort zone brings the sensational “Won’t You Share This Dream of Mine,” a fun piano driven romp. “I see a smoky and dark cocktail lounge in Paris, in the 1940’s. This is the first time I’ve written something of this nature, singing it in a different intimate style.“

The Music of My Life is a musical achievement for many reasons, not the least of which is the history that the man who has written all the music brings to this collection. A child prodigy – and to this day considered a musical genius – Sedaka showed a musical aptitude as early as the second grade. His mother took an extra job to be able to provide her talented son with a piano; he went on to earn a scholarship at the illustrious Julliard School of Music. It was at this time that a 13-year-old Neil began writing songs with his neighbor, Howard Greenfield. By 1958, Sedaka had a #14 hit with “The Diary”; in 1962 he scored the #1 slot with “Breaking Up is Hard to Do.” Between 1960 and 1962, Sedaka had an extraordinary eight Top 10 hits, and recorded songs in Yiddish, Hebrew, Japanese, German, Italian and Spanish.

Continuing his successful trajectory as a songwriter, Sedaka wrote for the Monkees, The 5th Dimension and Frankie Valli among others. The early 70s saw Sedaka, by now an international superstar, back in the studio recording future worldwide hit “Solitaire” with members of 10CC; this track that would go on to be covered by Andy Williams, The Carpenters, Elvis Presley and American Idol Clay Aiken. A year later he wrote one of his biggest hits, “Love Will Keep Us Together,” for his album The Tra-La Days Are Over; two years later, The Captain and Tennille version would go to #1. Sedaka than signed with Elton John’s Rocket Records, where he would top the charts with “Laughter in the Rain” and “Bad Blood,” with John providing backing vocals. Interestingly, the B-Side to the top selling “Laughter in the Rain” was “The Immigrant,” an ode to John Lennon, who was having trouble getting permanent resident status in the United States.

Sedaka has never stopped recording music or touring, receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and even doing a stint as a Guest Judge on American Idol. An inspiration to many, singer Ben Folds credits Sedaka with inspiring him to be a great songwriter. Since Neil had his first song published at the age of 13, Folds set the same goal for himself.

"There are three kinds of songwriting. Intellectual, Emotional, and Spiritual. Intellectual songwriting comes from the subconscious. You work out the music that is already in your head. Spiritual songwriting is when you are chosen by a higher power and you are the vessel in which these songs are produced. Emotional songwriting is when you write based on an event or a crisis. The writing is cathartic and allows you to release any stress. This is where these songs came from."

A true American icon, Neil Sedaka is very thankful for his musical talents. On The Music of My Life, we are grateful he has chosen to share that gift with us once again.

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

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