Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

71 of 75 people found the following review helpful
on September 11, 2004
Format: DVDVerified Purchase
I've been an Evangelion fan for quite some time and because of that I decided to start collecting the Platinum series in addition to my current EVA collection (Perfect Collection, Death/Rebirth, End of Evangelion and the two Director Cut DVD's) but with all products I see 2 kinds of reviews: in favor of the product or against it. But never something descriptive, so now I'm having a shot at it.

So what is the Platinum collection... Its a re-make of the original Neon Genesis Evangelion series. The sound dub's have been re-mastered (and in some cases re-done, for example the Japanese 5.1 dub) and the animation itself has been enhanced. This enhancement consists of a re-creation of the original picture (you can see this very clearly when comparing the original with this version) as well as newly added material. In contrary to what most people (including Amazon) say this DVD does hold new material, even though some of it consists of scenes which only last for 1 or 2 seconds. And if you've seen the original you can see that these small extra's really can enhance the overal experience.

This release also makes it quite clear that its aimed toward collectors. The DVD comes in a (cardbord) box which is shaped in the same way as the "Perfect Collection" box, it only has a different print and uses a different color (silver/grey). The box has room to house all 7 DVD releases. The DVD box is inserted in a silver cardbord box which has some very nice decorations on it. This one features a line-drawing of Shinji standing in front of some powerlines (as can be seen in the first episode) at the front, the back tells you what episodes are on the DVD. The DVD box itself comes with a very nice booklet which explains whats on the DVD and also has some nice Evangelion artwork. And to finish up; you'll get your own "Nerv Parking Permit"; a shine-through sticker which you can stick on the inside window of your car. All in all: its very clear that this isn't just an ordinary Evangelion DVD.

However, although the Platinum collection is a very good DVD its not as good as the original. Its like comparing a book with a movie: the book describes details and leave you to make up your own image of the scenes. In the original Evangelion serie not everything was drawn in precise detail, thus leaving it up to the viewer to form the complete picture. In my opinion this adds a lot to the whole experience. Things don't always have to be perfect in order to be experienced as perfect.

So is the Platinum collection worth it ?

If you are a fan of the series I'd say yes. Even if you already own the original series I'd still advice you to consider this one as well (a bit like Star Wars and the later released extended version) simply because of the extra's it offers and is going to offer.

However, if you just want to get an impression of the "Evangelion experience" then I'd advice you to seriously consider as to what you really want. If you just want a peek then this is a good DVD: cheaper than the original, holds 1 more episode than the original release 0-1 and has some nice collectors items.

But if you're new and plan on getting the whole serie then I'd advice you to start with the "Perfect Collection". Its cheaper, its original material and by the time you've finished that one you can always consider getting the Platinum collection. I'm pretty sure that a whole boxed set will eventually be released, which will probably cost you a lot less than collecting every DVD seperatly.

But... For fans this is really a must have collection.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2000
Format: DVD
Evangelion is without a doubt, my favorite animated series ever made. The story is beyond compare: it is the year 2015, in a post-apocalyptic setting. Creatures called Angels are attacking the city of Tokyo III, and the only way to combat them is with massive and mysterious robots called Evangelions, which can only be piloted by a 14-year old Child, born during the Second Impact. Confusing, right? Well throw in some incredibly deep philosophical ponderings, and religious ideologies, and you have a show that will drop your jaw with it's action-packed battles, stir you with it's intricate dramatic storyline, and ultimately change your life forever. Volume One has the first four Evangelion episodes, which basically introduce you to the story and the main characters: Shinji, Katsuragi, and Rei (unfortunatly, my favorite character, Asuka, isn't introduced until later episodes). The DVD features both the English version, and the Japanese subtitled version (as well as Spanish and French versions), and of course, enhanced picture and sound as well as some other goodies, making this the ultimate Eva. Now I can't wait for the others.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2000
Format: DVD
Ah, Evangelion. As almost every other anime fan out there, I saw this series years ago and instantly fell in love with it. So I was obviously looking forward to the (oft delayed) DVD release. So how does it rate? Pretty well. ADV has taken many steps to "localize" the show even further than it already had. Notes and papers that flash up on the screen have been translated completely from their Japanese into English. The "giant kanji title bars" of the VHS version have been scrapped in favor of subtle appearing text. While I appreciate the effort, I'm not sure why Gainax authorized this, and I could do without it. The english voices are decent. Being the only anime-fan who's watched the entire series dub, I can assure any fans that the acting only improves as the series progresses. The video quality isn't bad, despite what I've been hearing. I actually remember feeling that the VHS quality was substandard in the original recording, with off-center title bars and the like. That quickly became part of Eva's charm, and I'm glad that it's been retained, really. It isn't bad, it just hasn't changed. I did spot a few DVD transfer errors in this disc--choppy frames or skipping flashy parts. Hopefully ADV's DVD editor will pay a bit more attention in subsequent releases. Evangelion is a masterpiece, and should be experienced by everyone, anime fan or not. Its broad, sweeping scope and tragically real characters elevate the series to a plateau of excellence. I'm glad I have an excuse to watch it all again (and again...in four languages!) So if you've never had the pleasure of seeing Eva before...why haven't you already bought the disc? Do it now! If you've already gone through it all...I would recommend giving serious consideration to the DVD release--afterall, it'll last forever! Just..keep the VHS version around to introduce newbies to the full impact.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
36 of 41 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 2001
Format: DVD
To paraphrase a review in "Animerica" magazine, "Neon Genesis Evangelion" may in fact be the most important modern anime created. "Important," however, does not necessarily imply "best" or "worst" or indication of technical or artistic quality. On the whole, my opinion is that the assets far outweigh the liabilities of this series, but the liabilities are noticable and have been hotly debated ever since the show's ending. The TV show and concluding movie has inspired passion among anime fans and even outsiders (in Japan at least) that is rare for any TV show or movie, let alone an anime.
It's easy to see why--while this DVD may start with many of the cliches and conventions of the mecha anime, what is immediately noticeable is the following two things:
1.) The characters are the focus, not the action or plot. And these characters inspire all sorts of emotional reactions in the viewer rare in anime. In particular, Shinji is an atypical hero for this sort of show, and his attitude toward life and those around him has been the cause of no small debate over whether he is a worthless coward deserving of contempt (as he often states that he is!) or a traumatized child who deserves compassion and empathy. Immediately, even in these episodes and especially the fourth, the introverted, psychological nature of this show is established, and Shinji's is not alone in his trauma and inner torment--Misato, Asuka, Gendo, and Ritsuko all have their own issues to deal with that are explored throughly later. In my opinion, when character-oriented and psychological aspect of the narrative was emphasized more in the second half of the series, that's when "Eva" truly shined as a compelling drama and revealing portrait of the modern Japanese psyche.
2.) The direction is idiosyncratic and often experimental. Director Anno Hideaki is perhaps anime's most well known creative iconoclast, and he breaks numerous anime directing conventions and establishes his own animated film vocabulary in the shot composition camera angles (especially still shots of inert objects or certain ways of framing faces), fluid and often brutal action sequences, and later in the series, psychological montages remniscent of Eisenstein's "Battleship Potemkin" and French New-Wave films. The stark, serious nature of the series is established immediately in this DVD as well, though the idiosyncrasies of the direction are relaxed in the semi-comedic middle parts, and become much more pronounced in the latter half and especially in the endings. And with all this--for the most part, it's not that intrusive and the storytelling is clear and compelling. I love it.
Honest, searing characterization and boundary-shattering style are the great strengths of "Evangelion," and combined with the fact that I can identify a bit with Shinji and not feel the same contempt for him that other viewers often have, I think "Eva" is TV-anime's most important recent work. "Escaflowne" may have the better storytelling, "Serial Experiments Lain" may have more intellectual conundrums, and "Cowboy Bebop" may have the cooler music and balanced, if a bit detached, characters. But art, emotion, intelligence, and drama come together in "Evangelion" in a way that has set the standard for all the anime that has come afterwards--no matter how enthralled or enraged this series has made anime fans ever since.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on June 16, 2004
Format: DVD
I've actually watched Evangelion unlike Tweedledum65's review and the EVA series is actually pretty interesting and worth a good watching when you get the time to see it. EVA is the story of a boy named Shinji who is brought to NERV to be with his father (obviously a person who works at NERV)who creates the EVA's and stuff. The story gets complicated when his father has him pilot one of the EVA's and treats his son more like a dog then his immediate family. To make things more complicated (Rei a fellow classmate and EVA pilot)is forced to work with Shinji making the story very amusing, and his father practically pays more attention to Rei then Shinji! So whats a Shinji to do?? How will he cope with the pain agony torment of his father? Will he ever be treated as a son or an inanimate object...well you'll have to buy it to find that out! One more thing has Tweedledum65 ever thought about watching the shows he reviews before he complains about stuff he has no idea what he is talking about. The otakus of the world must unite against the chobos like Tweedledum65. Sorry Tweedledum65 but you're ignorant.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on October 7, 2000
Format: DVD
The mark of a masterpiece in any medium is the way in which it draws forth emotions normally suppressed in the daily affairs of human life. This is made abundantly clear by Neon Genesis Evangelion.
The first few episodes lull the viewer into thinking this is just another "big fighting robot anime." While thoroughly enjoyable, these scenes are just a backdrop for the deep philosophical questions posed by this series. When I first saw this NGE, a friend of mine who had seen other works by this directory told me to expect the series to take a "left turn" somewhere around episode 17. How true he was. By the end you'll have no doubts that this is not just about fighting robots.
I must admit that I'm dissapointed in the way ADV has been handling the DVD releases. They cannot afford to let the viewers hang on the first four episodes alone. NGE is something that needs to be experience in all its glory in a short period of time. I had the fortune to see the entire series in a weekend. I must confess, it was one the most mind-blowing experiences I've ever had. For the next week, I was unable to keep myself from spending every waking moment pondering the questions posed by NGE. This is something that cannot be accomplished by just any run-of-the-mill anime, but Neon Genesis is definitely not run-of-the-mill.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 2001
Format: DVD
To paraphrase a review in "Animerica" magazine, "Neon Genesis Evangelion" may in fact be the most important modern anime created. "Important," however, does not necessarily imply "best" or "worst" or indication of technical or artistic quality. On the whole, my opinion is that the assets far outweigh the liabilities of this series, but the liabilities are noticable and have been hotly debated ever since the show's ending. The TV show and concluding movie has inspired passion among anime fans and even outsiders (in Japan at least) that is rare for any TV show or movie, let alone an anime.
It's easy to see why--while this DVD may start with many of the cliches and conventions of the mecha anime, what is immediately noticeable is the following two things:
1.) The characters are the focus, not the action or plot. And these characters inspire all sorts of emotional reactions in the viewer rare in anime. In particular, Shinji is an atypical hero for this sort of show, and his attitude toward life and those around him has been the cause of no small debate over whether he is a worthless coward deserving of contempt (as he often states that he is!) or a traumatized child who deserves compassion and empathy. Immediately, even in these episodes and especially the fourth, the introverted, psychological nature of this show is established, and Shinji's is not alone in his trauma and inner torment--Misato, Asuka, Gendo, and Ritsuko all have their own issues to deal with that are explored throughly later. In my opinion, when character-oriented and psychological aspect of the narrative was emphasized more in the second half of the series, that's when "Eva" truly shined as a compelling drama and revealing portrait of the modern Japanese psyche.
2.) The direction is idiosyncratic and often experimental. Director Anno Hideaki is perhaps anime's most well known creative iconoclast, and he breaks numerous anime directing conventions and establishes his own animated film vocabulary in the shot composition camera angles (especially still shots of inert objects or certain ways of framing faces), fluid and often brutal action sequences, and later in the series, psychological montages remniscent of Eisenstein's "Battleship Potemkin" and French New-Wave films. The stark, serious nature of the series is established immediately in this DVD as well, though the idiosyncrasies of the direction are relaxed in the semi-comedic middle parts, and become much more pronounced in the latter half and especially in the endings. And with all this--for the most part, it's not that intrusive and the storytelling is clear and compelling. I love it.
Character and style are the great strengths of "Evangelion," and combined with the fact that I can identify a bit with Shinji and not feel the same contempt for him that other viewers often have, I think "Eva" is TV-anime's most important recent work. "Escaflowne" may have the better storytelling, "Serial Experiments Lain" may have more intellectual conundrums, and "Cowboy Bebop" may have the cooler music and balanced, if a bit detached, characters. But art, emotion, intelligence, and drama come together in "Evangelion" in a way that has set the standard for all the anime that has come afterwards--no matter how enthralled or enraged this series has made anime fans ever since.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on August 4, 2004
Format: DVDVerified Purchase
I bought this DVD with some skepticism as my previous experiences with ADV's release of the Evangelion series was less than stellar. The first editions featured edited animation and terrible mastering/picture quality. With this Platinum edition these mistakes have been corrected.

All Japanese text has been left intact and is now appended with English subtitles rather than outright deletion and replacement in the earlier editions. This in itself is something to celebrate for Eva purists.

The picture is superb. NGE has never looked this nice. Derived from the Eva-reissue in Japan about 2 years ago, the picture quality on these discs is excellent. Color and sharpness stand up to intense scrutiny on HDTV(Sony KV-32HS510).

The remastered audio, I only listened to the Japanese track, is a mixed bag. I really enjoy the sparse and spartan use of sound in Eva. Quite a few flourishes have been added to the new audio track found here. Then again I'm one of the few people I know who prefers the original eps 20-24 than what was remixed and released for LD in Japan.(recently released in the US by ADV as Director's Cut I believe?)

For Eva fans, I cannot endorse this edition of the series highly enough. The only downside is that it seems unlikely the US market will get the remastered versions of the three films because Manga owns the rights to those...By three films I mean:

<UL>

<LI> Evangelion Death : Evangelion Rebirth

<LI> The End of Evangelion: Air/My Pure Heart For You

<LI> Revival of Evangelion (which features Evangelion Death True 2 --note this is the version of Death released to the US market)

</UL>

Then again the Japanese box set that includes all that goes for between $600-1000 depending on your luck and has no subtitles.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 19, 2001
Format: DVD
Evangelion. The very word will bring masses of screaming otakus (anime fans) to their knees, as this 26-episode series is one of the most popular anime of all time. Often labelled as "the best anime series of all time" (often by unobjective fanboys), Neon Genesis Evangelion shoulders more than its fair share of hype but largely deserves its acclaim.
For those unacquainted with the series, "Evangelion" centers around a trio of precocious high school students blessed (or cursed) with the ability to pilot deadly bio-mechs assembled to prevent the destruction of Earth by mysterious "Angels". Shinji Ikari, the main character, has issues and initially refuses to pilot the so-called EVA unit assigned to him; Asuka Langley, a brash German girl who dons an air of superiority, doesn't make an appearance in this collection of four episodes; and Rei, an engimatic albino girl... well, it's safe to say that she has problems as well.
Generally speaking, "Evangelion" is an outstanding sci-fi series which defines the genre. Rather than devolving into the standard "mecha-action" cycle, it injects a number of unexpected, conspiratorial twists into an already original plot. This overriding conspiracy theme does grow out of hand at times, as the story becomes incomprehensibly complex with references to Lilith, Adam, and other biblical-inspired terms tossed into a muddy salad-- all I can recommend is searching the web for more detailed explanations. In addition, the casual viewer may question the overwhelmingly "angsty" nature of the characters as the series inexplicably takes a darker turn in its second half--I know I did. And the ending(s) can only be described as a head-scratcher.
Evangelion has some serious problems (which few fans will admit) that prevent it from rising to the absolute peak of the medium. However, few of these issues arise in the first four episodes, which begin to provide the layout for the series and take a decidedly lighter tone. Evangelion certainly doesn't suffer from a lack of originality, and its unique philosophical takes on life, no matter how outrageous they may seem, will make you think. This collection is certainly worth a look, even if it's just to see what everyone is talking about.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on July 25, 2004
Format: DVD
Evangelion Platinum Collection is the DVD release fans should have originally received but could not due to licensing issues. The Platinum release sees Gainax fully remastering each episode (no more jitter in early episodes!), as well as restoring some footage cut from the original broadcast. Furthermore, each episode's soundtrack has been remastered for 5.1 sound and commentary by English dub cast and crew has been added. Finally, the Platinum Collection will feature the Director's Cut discs previously released with new cuts of the final 6 episodes, as well as animated storyboards used in series production. As a final blessing the Platinum Collection will be released on 7 discs instead of the original release of 8.

If you own the series on VHS or have been dying to see it, then this release is for you. If you already have the first DVD release, then it's a mixed bag. For collectors a special release is availible that includes a limited edition box, metal-finish slipcase for Vol 1, unique numbering, and a NERV parking decal (that alone should make you want it!).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Evangelion: 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone
Evangelion: 1.11 You Are (Not) Alone by Allison Keith-Shipp (DVD - 2010)
$10.56


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.