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Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion


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DVD 1-Disc Version
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Product Details

  • Actors: Megumi Ogata, Megumi Hayashibara, Yûko Miyamura, Kotono Mitsuishi, Yuriko Yamaguchi
  • Directors: Hideaki Anno, Hiroyuki Ishidô, Kazuya Tsurumaki, Keiichi Sugiyama, Masahiko Ôtsuka
  • Format: Animated, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo), English (Dolby Digital 5.1 EX), English (DTS ES 6.1), Japanese (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo), Japanese (Dolby Digital 5.1 EX), Japanese (DTS ES 6.1)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: WEA
  • DVD Release Date: September 24, 2002
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (251 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000068OJ1
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,954 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Japanese production credits
  • Trailers

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

When the first Evangelion feature, Death and Rebirth, proved no more satisfying than the last episodes of the original series, Hideaki Anno brought his watershed epic to its conclusion in this final installment. End of Evangelion beg

Amazon.com

When the first Evangelion feature, Death and Rebirth, proved no more satisfying than the last episodes of the original series, Hideaki Anno brought his watershed epic to its conclusion in this final installment. End of Evangelion begins where the series ended: with the Angels defeated, the sinister cabal SEELE attacks NERV headquarters to seize the Evas and realize their plan for humanity. Misato and Ritsuko fight from inside while Asuka decimates a new Eva series. But when Rei merges with Lilith, and Shinji seems to fuse with Unit 01, the final traces of a coherent storyline dissolve into a protracted collage of fantastic images, played against discussions involving Rei, Shinji, Asuka, and Kaoru. Anno's dazzling apocalyptic vision forms a weird but oddly logical finale that ultimately means whatever the viewer chooses to read into it. This unrated feature, suitable for ages 17 and older, contains considerable violence, profanity, grotesque imagery, and sexual situations. --Charles Solomon

Customer Reviews

One of the best anime movies I've ever seen.
David Huber
Much like the NGE series, the End of Evangelion (EoE) weaves a complex story where images and dialogue are closely related to the philosophy and symbolism.
Suzanne
It's like Anno said "ok you want a real ending to Evangelion? Well here it is but boy am I gonna really mess you up with it".
Cloud

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

95 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Marc Ruby™ HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 20, 2002
Format: DVD
This film is the second ending produced for this series. The first ending (Episodes 25 and 26) left fans so dissatisfied that director Hideaki Anno felt compelled to create an alternate ending and issue it as a full length film. One should keep in mind when watching it that in the voice commentary provided in this edition this film is referred to as "Hideaki's revenge." I really do not think that is true, but there is no question but that the Director/Creator of this film has made a film that challenges the view on all fronts, making it an unusually difficult film.
The film opens on the impending destruction of NERV headquarters. With the destruction of the 'Angels,' the members of SEELE move to implement their plan for the forced evolution of humankind. Stage 1 is the capture or destruction of the EVA and their 'riders.' For the rest of the NERV staff only a grim and violent death is offered. Shinji and Asuka manage to activate their EVAs and fight back. Meanwhile, Rei descends into the heart of NERV with Dr. Ikari to confront Lilith.
While this apocalypse occupies the first part of the film, filling the screen with both spellbinding action and some unnerving interior insights, one could argue that it is only a prelude to the real core of the film. Almost haphazardly, symbols from the Kabbala and the Crucifixion are woven into the action as SEELE prepares the ritual that will recreate humanity. Magically, Rei and Shinji become the main characters in a metaphysical play that will decide the future of man. It is no surprise that these two become bound to the moments of decision and rebirth. Both the characters are not completely whole as personalities. To each of them the conflict over individuality is both interior and exterior.
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80 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Anders Jorgensen on June 14, 2002
Format: DVD
Having read numerous reviews of this film, I feel it to be necessary to clarify several issues.
Most prominent among them is the common misconception that this film is an 'alternate ending'. Though it is, of course, different from the version seen in the television series, it results in the same essential end. This is actually a physical depiction of the end of Neon Genesis Evangelion, as the first ending was, in fact, the more psychological, 'post-apocalypse' (if you will accept this description) ending. The end to the television series occurs not during the 'third-impact' (yes, this is a spoiler), but a year afterward, when instrumentality (or complementation, which is what the official Manga subtitled version addresses it as) has succeeded, and mankind has been merged. This film doesn't disregard the scenes in the final two episodes, as, in fact, every 'anomalous' scene from episode twenty five (The Ending World) from the series is seen in its true form in this film.
Of course, in the end of this film itself, it's far different from the end seen on television, but this is intentional, as Anno intended to destroy any preconceived notions established about the answers to the anomalies presented in the original series, and, also, to frighten and disturb the viewer out of complacency. Having seen this film in both the 'official' (Manga subtitled) version, and the Fansub version, I can honestly state that this is, perhaps, one of the most frightening and disturbing anime films ever, but, also, it is my favorite (of course, I'm biased, as Neon Genesis Evangelion is my favorite anime, and, in my opinion, the greatest ever created).
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48 of 54 people found the following review helpful By D. K. Malone on June 3, 2005
Format: DVD
I just wanted to post this quote because I think it's something people should know regarding the relationship between the TV series and this movie:

"According to 'The Red Cross Book' (which was sold at End of Evangelion screenings during its original theatrical release in Japan in 1997 and was officially endorsed by Gainax,) the original scripts for the final two episodes of the TV series were scrapped at the last minute. The reasons are not divulged, but there are rumors that sponsor funding was cut due to controversy about the content, and that Hideaki and Gainax were pressured to end the series differently, in a very short time frame. The result is that the final two episodes of the TV series bear little resemblance to the rest of the show. The book then goes on to say that the original scrapped scripts were essentially fished out of the garbage and were the basis for the feature film End of Evangelion. In other words, it's arguable that the final two episodes of the TV series are invalid, and that End of Evangelion is in fact the true ending to the series as originally envisioned by its creators."
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Suzanne on March 2, 2007
Format: DVD
For those turning to this film to answer all the questions that the last two episodes of the Evangelion (NGE) series didn't answer, I suggest you look elsewhere. If anything, this film will provide you with precious few answers but a multitude of new questions. For those wanting a highly provocative, thought-provoking, intelligent and most poignant conclusion to the NGE series, then have no fear. I will try to explain some of the more perplexing elements in this film, without giving too much away, as well giving my thoughts and opinions at the same time.

The film is structured to be the final two episodes of the series. So the first half, Ep. 25 "Air/Love is Destructive" is concurrent with the series episode 25 "The World Ending/Do You Love Me?". The second half, Ep. 26. "My Purest Heart for You/One More Final: I Need You" is concurrent with the series episode 26 "The Beast that Shouted Love at the Heart of the World/Take Care of Yourself."

Much like the NGE series, the End of Evangelion (EoE) weaves a complex story where images and dialogue are closely related to the philosophy and symbolism. These themes are played out through the psychology of each characters' own mind. It is essentially a microcosm of the entire series. The opening scenes before the "Air" title card of Ep. 25 of Shinji overlooking the ruins of the city, and then entering Asuka's hospital room and, (I'll leave it there) set the mood and atmosphere. Showing effectively and very disturbingly that this is NOT going to be an easy film. As the first half roars out of the gates at breakneck speed, we see the hostile takeover of Nerv by the Seele organization and each Nerv member's desperate attempt to hold it at bay.
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Evangelion 1.0
First, get any of the versions of Neon Genesis Evangelion Platinum. Watch the "normal" episodes 1-26 first. Watch Episodes 1-20 again. Watch the Director's Cut versions of Episodes 21-24. Finish by buying and watching The End of Evangelion. Continue to buy the Rebuild of Evangelion... Read More
Mar 22, 2009 by we are two |  See all 4 posts
evangelion
I know this is years late, but if you are still interested...

Start here: Neon Genesis Evangelion: Platinum Collection

End Here: Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion

Pretty straight forward.

Optional: [[ASIN:B000068OIY Neon Genesis Evangelion:... Read More
Feb 5, 2013 by Jack Pacini |  See all 2 posts
In defense of Evangelion - Spoilers Be the first to reply
End of Evangelion, Death and Rebirth. blue-ray? Be the first to reply
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