Industrial-Sized Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums $5 Off Fire TV Stick Grocery Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Disney Infinity 3.0 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day
Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.95
  • Save: $12.60 (38%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Network-Centric Warfare: ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Your purchase also supports literacy charities.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Network-Centric Warfare: How Navies Learned to Fight Smarter Through Three World Wars Hardcover – March 1, 2009

7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$20.35
$16.36 $6.87

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$20.35 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Network-Centric Warfare: How Navies Learned to Fight Smarter Through Three World Wars + Information at Sea: Shipboard Command and Control in the U.S. Navy, from Mobile Bay to Okinawa (Johns Hopkins Studies in the History of Technology)
Price for both: $69.81

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Norman Friedman is a defense analyst and historian specializing in the intersection of technology and national strategy. He was Deputy Director of National Security Studies at the Hudson Insitute in New York under Herman Kahn, and later was personal consultant to the Secretary of the Navy for a decade. The author of 33 books, he conducted or co-authored numerous studies, and served as a futurologist for the U.S. Marine Corps in 2002-2004.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 360 pages
  • Publisher: Naval Institute Press (March 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591142865
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591142867
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #352,748 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Retired Reader on March 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a chronology of how naval command and control (C2) systems evolved over the last 100 years in response to changing technologies and threat environments. It focuses especially on the U.S. Navy, but includes discussions of foreign naval developments as well. It is an indispensable book to understand how the U.S. Navy's conception of `command and decision' (CD), the navy's version of C2, led incrementally to the current CD system sometimes called Network Centric Warfare (NSW), but which Friedman prefers to call `picture centric warfare'. As Friedman makes clear NSW is only the latest iteration of a continually evolving concept. Friedman has identified three phases that mark the evolution CD systems: the radio phase; the radar phase; and the computer phase.

The first phase is what he calls the [wireless] radio phase. This began in the first ten years of the 20th Century, when First Sea Lord, Sir John Fisher (of Dreadnaught fame) determined that the most economical way to deal with the problems facing the Royal Navy was to introduce what today would be called a centralized C2 system based on ocean surveillance, wireless communications, signals intelligence and what today are called flag plots (i.e. ship locations). Fisher then proposed to use the information produced by this system to vector ships against enemy naval threats. WWI (1914-1918) saw Fisher's concept tested and proven. Fisher essentially created the first command, control, communications , intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C3ISR) system concept on which all future developments were based.

The U.S. Navy took the lead in Friedman's radar phase which really began in WWII and lasted through the Cold War.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joel R. VINE VOICE on May 18, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Who is the bigger genius - the person who comes up with a cerebral concept, or the person that can effectively communicate it to the public? I first heard a presentation on Network Centric Warfare back in 1998 from Mr. John Garstka, who had worked with Admiral Cebrowski on perfecting this transformational concept of warfare. Friedman makes the allusion that "Network Centric Warfare" is in reality, "Picture Centric Warfare". It was the ability to take disparate information systems to create a picture of the battlespace that has been the true revolution in military affairs. Friedman succeeds in taking a complex theory and presenting in in understandable terms & supporting it with very clear case studies.

Friedman asserts the British Navy first showed the capability of Network Centric Warfare to process multiple intelligence systems during World War I. By combining two nascent intelligence capabilities -- direction finding & code breaking -- the British were able to locate the German fleet, thus solving one of the oldest problems of naval warfare (locating the adversary's fleet). Now that they had the ability to do that, the British were able to free up ships from blockade duty (they already knew where the adversary was, so they didn't need to look anywhere else). The Battle of Jutland was the acme of the application of Network Centric Warfare, where the British were able to anticipate the location of the German fleet before they sailed, and were therefore able to have their fleet in perfect position to "Cross the T."

Friedman then follows the natural evolution of the application of American intelligence collection & fusion through World War II, Vietnam, and the Gulf War.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shellback on December 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Contrary to popular belief Network-Centric Warfare is not a new concept, but it is something that has evolved over the past hundred years with technology. Norman Friedman starts out describing how the British Navy used technology to position its fleet of ships throughout the world prior to WW I, and he then explains how network-centric warfare concepts were employed by different countries in WW II, Vietnam, the Cold War and Operation Enduring Freedom. He goes into the history of current and obsolete command and control systems ranging from dead reckoning tables to GCCS-M. The amount of information Mr Friedman has compiled on C2 systems that no longer exists is amazing. The book is technical and I mean technical it is written for a military contractor, or someone who loves to study military weapon systems not for the casual reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael Mcdaniel on January 26, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Network-centric warfare is thought of as new, but Friedman traces its roots back over a century, to the insights of Admiral John Fisher in the late 1800s. And he conveys the principles clearly, without bogging down in technical jargon.

I will quibble about one thing...Friedman lays great stress on Moore's Law (that the cost of computing is halved every 18 months). This may be true, but it has become increasingly irrelevant. Software, not hardware, now drives networked systems. And software is much, much harder to create.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Network-Centric Warfare: How Navies Learned to Fight Smarter Through Three World Wars
This item: Network-Centric Warfare: How Navies Learned to Fight Smarter Through Three World Wars
Price: $20.35
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: weapons, military history