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Networking Futures: The Movements against Corporate Globalization (Experimental Futures) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Experimental Futures
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 9, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822342693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822342694
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #949,856 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Networking Futures [is] an exciting and important book, and a contribution to sociology. . . . Juris provides us with an understanding of how activists are at the forefront of this global transformation, through their creative use of internet and other technologies, and through their comprehensively democratic and reflexive exploration of new social forms.” - Judith Blau, Contemporary Sociology


“The view Juris offers is more in-depth than has been generally reported even by sympathetic journalists. . . . Networking Futures stands as a pioneering document of what may yet prove to be a new new world order.” - Vince Carducci, Popmatters


“As well as being an insightful and inspiring resource for activists, Networking Futures: The Movements Against Corporate Globalisation, is a absorbing history of the ever-evolving contemporary resistance to corporate globalisation. I found it a refreshing antidote to the constant barrage of neo-conservative blather emanating from the mouths of free market evangelists on the pages and the airwaves of the mainstream media—especially read in the context of collapsing global markets!” - Megan Yarrow, M/C Reviews


Networking Futures is one of the very first detailed ethnographic accounts of the alternative globalisation movement. The book manages to weave together some of the key historical moments of its ineluctable rise into a single compelling narrative from the intimate perspective of someone who was there. . . . Juris’s many accounts of the vitality, creativity and innovativeness of the alternative globalisation movement will inspire activists and academics alike for many years to come.” - Marco Cuevas-Hewitt, Anthropological Forum


Networking Futures is a terrific, deeply informed ethnographic account of the origins and activities of the anti–corporate globalization movement. Jeffrey S. Juris’s identity is as much that of an activist who happens to be doing first-rate anthropology as vice versa, and there is much for anthropologists to reflect on in the way that this work is set up and narrated through these dual identities.”—George E. Marcus, co-author of Designs for an Anthropology of the Contemporary


Networking Futures is one of the very first books to map in detail the multiple networks that are challenging corporate globalization. Taking as a point of departure an exemplary case—the Catalan anti–globalization movements of the past decade—Jeffrey S. Juris moves on to chronicle the collective struggles to construct not only an alternative vision of possible worlds but the means to bring them about. Networking Futures is a compelling portrait of the spirit of innovation that lies behind an array of progressive mobilizations, from anarchist movements and street protests to the World Social Forum. Based on a well-developed notion of collaborative ethnography, it is also a wonderful example of engaged scholarship: a much-needed alternative to academic work as usual.”—Arturo Escobar, author of Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes


“Jeffrey S. Juris gives us an illuminating model for how to study networks from below using the tools of ethnography. And in the process he reveals the extraordinary power (as well as the challenges) of network organizing for social movements today.”—Michael Hardt, co-author of Empire and Multitude

From the Publisher

"Networking Futures is one of the very first books to map in detail the multiple networks that are challenging corporate globalization. Taking as a point of departure an exemplary case--the Catalan anti-globalization movements of the past decade--Jeffrey S. Juris moves on to chronicle the collective struggles to construct not only an alternative vision of possible worlds but the means to bring them about. Networking Futures is a compelling portrait of the spirit of innovation that lies behind an array of progressive mobilizations, from anarchist movements and street protests to the World Social Forum. Based on a well-developed notion of collaborative ethnography, it is also a wonderful example of engaged scholarship: a much-needed alternative to academic work as usual."--Arturo Escobar, author of Territories of Difference: Place, Movements, Life, Redes

"Jeffrey S. Juris gives us an illuminating model for how to study networks from below using the tools of ethnography. And in the process he reveals the extraordinary power (as well as the challenges) of network organizing for social movements today."--Michael Hardt, co-author of Empire and Multitude

"Networking Futures is a terrific, deeply informed ethnographic account of the origins and activities of the anti-corporate globalization movement. Jeffrey S. Juris's identity is as much that of an activist who happens to be doing first-rate anthropology as vice versa, and there is much for anthropologists to reflect on in the way that this work is set up and narrated through these dual identities."--George E. Marcus, co-author of Designs for an Anthropology of the Contemporary


More About the Author

Thanks for checking out the book and to everyone who helped make it possible, especially all my fellow global justice activists in Barcelona and around the world!

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kati on April 16, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Juris gives us an excellent ethnographic study of networked social movements, without losing site of his subject.

Many recent monographs that take as their object of interest "networks" or "social movements"-- shifting and somewhat ephemeral as they are-- jump around too much in their attempts to "follow the object." These examples tend to be overly theoretical and devoid of the best qualities of ethnography: human voices!

Juris manages to follow his interlocutors around the globe to different anti-globalization protests, rallies, etc, while still giving ethnographic insight into who these people are, what their motivations are, and how they manage to organize their groups across geographic and digital space. Juris's "militant" positioning allows him to get inside information from radical anarchist groups while being critically reflexive.

Juris's book struck me as an innovative approach to studying social movements. An important and interesting topic given the influence of various social movements and interest groups on politics today. I would really like to see it compared to a similar type of study on right-wing political movements.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bruno on June 2, 2010
Format: Paperback
Since the Internet revolutionized communication technology in the nineties, the concept of the network has become an organizational model to be emulated--a utopian vision even--across vastly different spheres of social life, not the least of which is political activism. The growing importance and prevalence of activist networks, however, has been reflected in only a limited way in the anthropological literature on social movements, and few scholars have approached networks as more than mere abstractions and metaphors at best or, at worst, as static structures. Networking Futures: The Movements Against Corporate Globalization by Jeffrey Juris, on the other hand, provides us with a very necessary and highly successful ethnographic study of the concrete mechanisms, practices, and social relations that constitute the activist networks characteristic of the anti-corporate globalization movements that began with the Zapatista uprising in 1994 and the anti-WTO protests in Seattle in 1999. Since those times, the organizational models and utopian imaginaries of activist networks have profoundly reshaped the social movement landscape across the globe--particularly in Western Europe, Latin America, and the United States--making Juris' well-theorized and richly descriptive study relevant for readers across scholarly disciplines and geographical boundaries.
Juris describes activist networks as "locally rooted, but globally connected", and he attempts to make his own research similarly "multi-scalar". Thus, his research is rooted in long-term ethnographic fieldwork with the Movement for Global Resistance (MRG), a Barcelona based activist network, with which he actively participated in numerous meetings, discussions, events, and direct-action protests.
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