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Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions Hardcover – September 4, 2000


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Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions + Being No One: The Self-Model Theory of Subjectivity (A Bradford Book) + The Ego Tunnel: The Science of the Mind and the Myth of the Self
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Product Details

  • Series: Bradford Books
  • Hardcover: 360 pages
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book; 1st edition (September 4, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262133709
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262133708
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 7.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,673,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Being No One is Kantian in its scope, intelligence and depth. Steeped in contemporary neuroscience, psychology and philosophy, the book gives the unsolved Kantian problems of inner self and outer world a new look, a new life, and a new route to solution. Metzinger's story is understandable, compelling, and, quite simply, very very smart."--Patricia S. Churchland, UC President's Professor of Philosophy, University of California, San Diego

About the Author

Thomas Metzinger is Professor of Philosophy at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany. He is the editor of Neural Correlates of Consciousness (MIT Press, 2000).

More About the Author

Thomas Metzinger (*1958 in Frankfurt am Main, Germany) is currently Professor of Theoretical Philosophy at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz and an Adjunct Fellow at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Study.

In 2008 he received a one-year Fellowship at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (Berlin Institute for Advanced Study), is past president of the German Cognitive Science Society and was president of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness from 2009 to 2010.

His focus of research lies in analytical philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophical aspects of the neuro- and cognitive sciences as well as connections between ethics, philosophy of mind and anthropology.

In the English language, he has edited two collections on consciousness ("Conscious Experience", Paderborn: mentis & Thorverton, UK: Imprint Academic, 1995; "Neural Correlates of Consciousness", Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2000) and one major scientific monograph developing a comprehensive, interdisciplinary theory about consciousness, the phenomenal self, and the first-person perspective ("Being No One - The Self-Model Theory of Subjectivity", Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2003).

In 2009, he published a popular book, which addresses a wider audience and also discusses the ethical, cultural and social consequences of consciousness research ("The Ego Tunnel - The Science of the Mind and the Myth of the Self", New York: Basic Books).
Details at http://www.philosophie.uni-mainz.de/metzinger/ET.html

There are a number of videos on YouTube, German as well as English. More information at Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Metzinger

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is really great - it is a tour de force through all disciplines related to consciousness research, including philosophy of science and of mind, neuroscience, cognitive and neuropsychology. It is safe to say that it is written not only by some of the most important researchers in the field (which is true of many books), but also by MOST of them. The list of contributors is really remarkable, and a number of chapters are important updates of their current theories. There are also some chapters including new research data of high quality, some citable as important original work available nowhere else! I think this book should grace any library on consciousness research, not only for its interdisciplinary architecture but also as reflecting the state of art in this area.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Carlos Camara on October 19, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I absolutely loved this book. Nowhere else had I read such an interesting and complete review of where the field of consciousness studies presently stands. The first part of the book, mostly by philosophers, shows that fruitfull interactions are possible betwween science and philosophy. The part on visual consciousness is impressive, shedding much light on new theories and possibilities. In part 2, Damasio, Crick, Edelman and Singer introduce their candidates for the NCC masterfully. The last and more philosophically inclined part of the book, reviews some usually overlooked issues, but unfortunately ends up being mostly speculative. Overall, however,in my opinion this book is the most important contribution to consciousness literature to date.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By DR P. Dash on February 5, 2003
Format: Hardcover
For me, the most interesting thing about this book was the attempt to establish a dialog between neuroscience and philosopy, wherein philosophy is able to sharpen questions posed by neuroscientists, and in turn the findings of neuroscience help shape philosophical questions. One of the more successful examples of this dialog is in "theory of mind," really first brought to the fore by philosophers, then turned into empirical questions that have been addressed experimentally by both developmental psychologists and neuroscientists. However, I have to say I found some of the philosophical contributions in this book rather heavy going, though I imagine those with more of a philosophy background would have the same to say about the neuroscientific chapters! I agree that the contributors are top-notch, with two of them (Edelman and Crick) Nobelists. Several of them have more expansive versions of their theories presented elsewhere...e.g. Damasio in his "The Feeling of What Happens" and Edelman in "A Universe of Consciousness", though the chapters here are nice, brief summaries of their ideas.
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Format: Hardcover
"In order to get away from the shallowness and the constant misunderstandings inherent in many popular discussions of conscious experience, one has to first understand that reduction is a relationship between theories, and not between phenomena. A primitive scientistic ideology would be just as bad as succumbing to Mysterianism." P 5 This sounds like an interesting project to get involved with today. Will it really be necessary on a wide scale or are we concerned with a relative few? Chalmers starts off describing what might or might not be the necessary and sufficient causes of NCCs. (cont)
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