Never Coming to a Theater Near You and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$5.44
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Never Coming To A Theater Near You Hardcover – September 28, 2004


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$6.32 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs; First Edition edition (September 28, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586482319
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586482312
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 6.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #451,950 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The title of this book, a collection of Turan's daily newspaper reviews from the Los Angeles Times, promises the unearthing of deeply obscure material or a truly revolutionary take on old favorites. Turan, who is also a contributor to NPR's Morning Edition, sets the book up more modestly in his introduction as a guide to unsung films now on DVD and video. He's a lovely reviewer, able to encapsulate a film's charms in a few phrases, and he has a particular knack for opening sentences, an important tool for any newspaper writer. But the section on English-language films contains reviews of movies like Election, Dead Man Walking and Muriel's Wedding—i.e., multiple Oscar nominees and winners, many that benefited from mass-market publicity campaigns. In essence, Turan's favorite flicks are already sung. His section on foreign films is far more useful, since many of them had very limited releases. Turan saves the best for last: nine longer essays he calls "Retrospectives." These pieces treat topics we don't hear much about: the great directors Max Ophuls and Frank Borzage, the delectable treats that came from "pre-code" Hollywood, and Yiddish film. And Turan's funny gloss on the familiar conventions of Chinese martial arts films shows how perceptive and winning he can be.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Turan, Los Angeles Times and National Public Radio film critic, collects reviews of more than 140 films that may have slipped under most filmgoers' radar. While such films as Dirty Pretty Things, Yi Yi, crumb, and Eyes without a Face did not get the distribution of The Lord of the Rings, they have, according to Turan, made his "professional life richly rewarding." His readily apparent enthusiasm comes without hyperbole, although he is prone to saying such things as "Nigel Hawthorne's work as the deranged monarch . . . enlarges our understanding of what acting can accomplish"--which can be taken as a bit grand. Reviews have been updated and revised--some include brief notes about what certain actors have gone on to do--but the one on Mike Leigh's Naked makes no reference to his Secrets & Lies and the one on The Commitments does not refer to The Snapper, also based on a Roddy Doyle novel. A section on retrospectives is a nice bonus, as are articles on such filmmakers as Anthony Mann and Frank Borzage. Benjamin Segedin
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Reading this volume is a film education in itself and a pleasure.
Dennis Littrell
After reading this book, I now have many more movies to add to my Netflix queue.
dephal
Most of the films included are contemporary independent and foreign films.
Timothy Kearney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

131 of 131 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Littrell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 28, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The kind of movies that Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan is talking about in this fine collection of his reviews are those that are "sophisticated, mature, [and] always entertaining." (p. xiv) His point in the title about such films "never coming to a theater near you" is a good one since most of the films reviewed here had either a short life on the large screen or went directly to video and DVD. (The exceptions are classics like The Third Man (1949), A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), and others which were produced before the advent of video and DVD.) The reason, as every veteran film viewer knows, is that most movies shown in theaters today are aimed at a relatively young and unsophisticated mass audience, an audience that demands (producers believe) the sort of film that most of us have grown out of.

Turan's book is in five parts, English Language Films, Foreign Language Films, Documentaries, Classics, and Retrospectives. Characteristic English language films are, Election (1999), Heavenly Creatures (1994), Manny and Lo (1996), Proof (1991), 12 Monkeys (1995), to name some that I have seen and reviewed myself, and 66 more. Some foreign language films are, Autumn Tale (1998), Un Coeur en Hiver (1992), The Dreamlife of Angels (1998), Red (Trois Couleurs: Rouge) (1994), and 39 others. There are 20 documentaries including, Black Harvest (1994), Fast, Cheap, and Out of Control (1997), The Saltmen of Tibet (1998), etc. The classics include Das Boot (1981), Once Upon a Time in America (1984), Vertigo (1958), and nine others. What the selections in this eclectic assemblage have in common is that they are all very much worth seeing--at least the ones that I have seen. Indeed several of them--Un Coeur en Hiver, Red, Das Boot, A Streetcar Named Desire, etc.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Ronald Scheer on November 26, 2004
Format: Hardcover
What a wonderful idea for a book! Kenneth Turan has brought together 150 reviews representing the top 5% of the films he sees as film critic for the Los Angeles Times. The result is a collection of movie reviews for (a) little-known and under-sung films that are (b) for grownup audiences instead of teenagers and (c) available on VHS and DVD.

Altogether there are reviews of movies from 39 countries, most of them released over the last dozen or so years, half of them English-language films. The other half are foreign language and documentaries. Turan also includes reviews of 12 classic movies and nine short essays on subjects ranging from Chinese martial arts to pre-code Hollywood films. There are no blockbusters here and very few films you're likely to have seen on HBO. They are instead the movies made with a nod to the inner adult - original, entertaining and wise, while touching on real emotions.

While I'd seen most of the English-language films Turan includes, and said "yes!" to each choice (like "A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries" and "Uncle Vanya on 42nd Street"), it was the foreign films and documentaries I knew far less about. And with a short list quickly picked from those sections, I went straight to Vidiots in Santa Monica, which had all of them. Starting with two French comedies, "The Dinner Game" and "Un Air de Famille," we were greatly entertained on a lazy Thanksgiving afternoon.

Turan has his sensibilities and his film sense all finely tuned. You can trust him to pick the good ones. And you can wonder at the other 95% of not-so-great fare he had to wade through to get to these gems.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By dephal VINE VOICE on December 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
I live sort of in the sticks--nothing plays at the local theaters except the big blockbusters. So this books serves as a great resource to all the movies I missed: independent films, foreign films, and (my personal favorite) documentaries. After reading this book, I now have many more movies to add to my Netflix queue. I have already seen quite a few of the films Turan reviews in this book, and I enjoyed them all, so I feel I can trust the other reviews in this book.

The "retorespectives" section at the end of the book is also valuable, and will serve as a good introduction for me to several genres and oevres.

I do have one complaint about the book, in that it is already a couple of years out of date. I hope Turan comes out with an updated edition soon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Timothy Kearney VINE VOICE on June 16, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I'm not sure I consider myself a film buff. Friends often ask me to recommend a film or DVD, claiming I see "everything" which is hardly the case. Some even call me a film buff but I believe I've never earned the title. Friends of mine who can name any actor/actress/director in films well known and obscure, as well as release dates, studios, and quote Pauline Kael the way some people quote scripture or Shakespeare are in my estimation film buffs. I'm only a dabbler in comparison. Yet when I purchased NEVER COMING TO A THEATER NEAR YOU, I realized how many wonderful films I have seen and became even more appreciative that I live in a major metropolitan area that still has a few good small theatres and a theatre that shows great independent films.

NEVER COMING TO A THEATER NEAR YOU will be enjoyed by anyone who is an enthusiast for film and anyone who wants to watch great films that were critically acclaimed and loved by audiences, albeit smaller audiences than the blockbusters. Most are easily available on DVD/video. The book is a collection of film reviews by Kenneth Turan, a critic for both NPR and THE LOS ANGELES TIMES. Turan does not use the book to lambaste the state of Hollywood or criticize the quality of the most popular films released today. Instead, he gives readers the opportunity to read reviews of films that are of good quality but may have been overlooked when they were released.

Most of the films included are contemporary independent and foreign films. Turan focuses on these films rather than the better known releases believing that reviews of these films, including reviews penned by Turan himself, are readily available.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?