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Never Say Never: Finding a Life That Fits Hardcover – April 17, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Atria Books; 1ST edition (April 17, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1451627173
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451627176
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,028,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A sometimes-humorous, self-reflective chronicle of a triumphant journey through a troublesome childhood, chaotic young adulthood and fulfilled middle age." —Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Ricki Lake is an actress, television host, and the executive producer of the documentary, The Business of Being Born. She is also the author of Your Best Birth. She lives with her two sons in Los Angeles.

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Customer Reviews

Ricki was just not willing to let you guess how she feels.
Amazon Customer
It was so powerful to read- and feel- the transformation Ricki made when she stopped identifying herself only by her weight.
M. Corridan
At first it held my attention, but then it became too wordy.
Mrs. Miller

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Frances v Langbecker on April 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I sat down for just a moment earlier today and thought I would read for a few minutes. Hours later I finished this wonderful memoir. There were times that made me feel such pain for this little girl and then such joy for this fiesty spirit. I find it hard to imagine any woman who cannot relate to many experiences Ricki Lake describes. Maybe that is what makes her so special? Maybe that is why everyone seems to relate to her? Or maybe it is all because of her grandma Sylvia. This book is a great read and though not a tell-all or a self help made me feel like I know her better and has in some way helped.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Crabigail Cassidy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 29, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I assumed, incorrectly, that this would be a tell all from actress and talk show host Ricki Lake. Instead, this was a book that was born from the heart and so easily relatable that it could be anyone's story, even mine. At time I got a little weepy, but more often I felt energized by Lake's candor and honesty.
From going from a cute little girl who experienced abuse from even those closest to her, her only safe haven her grandmother Sylvia Lake who always made her a star, and her ongoing problems with weight and self-image, it had elements which most women can relate to. By working hard to take off the pounds and quite literally come out of her cocoon, Lake is able to launch her own period of self-realization where she was able to define her true self and reach her own potential.
As all good stories progress, she also finds, beyond her own power and strength, happiness. She recently married the man that completes and enhances her, but more importantly also loves her as herself.
The subtitle 'Finding A Life That Fits' is a wonderful metaphor for Lake's journey. While this is not exactly a self-help book, it is inspirational to the extent that it talks about some serious external problems and internal problems and the process involved in working through the bad stuff to realize a life that 'fits'.
This book is well written, interesting, and gives hope to all of us who want to evolve and change to be our best.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By M. Corridan on April 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I started the book feeling sad for this little girl who had been abused and neglected by the people she needed and most deserved love and attention from. Yet I ended the book wiping happy tears from my eyes with all that Ricki overcame and worked so hard to get and create in her life. From her own telling, Ricki's life had ups and downs and yet all of them are what got her to her happy ending today.

I loved so much about the book but a few points that stick out most to me include:

Her honesty with her body image and weight struggle, even as it continues today, is so relatable to anyone out there who struggles with their weight. It was sad to read how much time she spent hating her image and living in denial. But it was so powerful to read how once she got her weight under control, she gained so much more which ultimately gave her the freedom to truly accept herself, flaws and all. And this paved the way for Ricki to ultimately meet and fall in love with someone who could properly support, shelter, love and adore her just as she is.

It was so powerful to read- and feel- the transformation Ricki made when she stopped identifying herself only by her weight. Putting her focus and attention on the birth movement was incredible and had she not moved beyond the fat girl image she had for most of her life, the world would have been deprived. It was fascinating to read about her first experience giving birth and then to read about her second experience and then to see how that informed and ignited Ricki to make sure all women everywhere knew their birthing options. (As an aside, I watched the Business of Being Born and loved it!)

I loved the humor and realness throughout the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sylvia Barker on July 26, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought it would be better than it was. Was rahter disappointed. I found that the writing was not good enough to keep my interest.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mediaman on July 18, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Ricki Lake's book is sad and pathetic, where she blames her mother for all of her problems and claims to view life like a "Disney princess" while she demeans those close to her and refuses to accept responsibility for her own issues.

The book starts out talking about her weight insecurities and focuses way, way too much on her size. This woman has some serious psychological issues that have obviously not been resolved, no matter how much she wants to convince you otherwise. She claims the villains (and there are many of them) are her mother, her half-hearted father, her childhood instructor and a couple of characters that she claims abused her as a child. It is sad if her molestation stories are true...however, the way she writes them they sound as if they could be exaggerated and the fact that she blames her mother for allowing them to happen is disgusting when she knows her mom didn't have anything to do with it.

It's also ironic that this "role model" for tolerance and acceptance of diversity uses the book to be so condemning and judgmental of those who actually helped her in life. She comes across as incredibly intolerant of anyone traditional. For example, this college drop-out says of her instructors, "Teachers can blow a toxic cloud of envy at their students when they feel their own career has been a disappointment." She claims she was "undervalued and discouraged by authority figures," when they may have just been telling her truth she didn't want to hear.

In one of the most terrible things I've ever read in a celebrity autobiography, she condemns her formerly Jewish parents for becoming Christians.
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