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Neverwinter Campaign Setting: A 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons Supplement (4th Edition D&D) Hardcover – August 16, 2011


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Neverwinter Campaign Setting: A 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons Supplement (4th Edition D&D) + Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide, 4th Edition
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

MATT SERNETT is a game designer at Wizards of the Coast. His most recent design credits include the Monster Vault™ boxed set (a Dungeons & Dragons Essentials® product) and the Orcs of Stonefang Pass™ adventure.

ERIK SCOTT DE BIE has written several Forgotten Realms® novels and short stories, as well as adventures for the Dungeons & Dragons Encounters in-store play program.

ARI MARMELL is a freelance game designer and novelist with numerous credits to his name, including the Dark Sun® Creature Catalog™ supplement and the 4th Edition Tomb of Horrors™ super-adventure.
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Product Details

  • Series: 4th Edition D&D
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast; Supplement edition (August 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786958146
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786958146
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 0.7 x 11.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,873 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful By William M. Wilson on August 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Being objective with this one is hard, because I'm not really a big Forgotten Realms fan. I love the original 1e Grey Box, but past then, I just haven't liked it much. It's fair to say that even the (imo, underrated) 4e setting is one of my least favorite settings. Still, I know enough to trust WotC with setting books by this point, so I ended up snagging it. It's a remarkably well-done example of something I don't necessarily care for, if that makes sense. I don't know that I will ever run a Forgotten Realms game again, but if I do, this will be a good place to start.

Much like Gloomwrought, this is a self-contained campaign. If you have this and the game rules (and DDI for monsters), you can run a full Heroic-tier campaign - honestly, *several* Heroic-tier campaigns - easily. Please do note - although the mechanics cover all 30 levels, this setting is specifically and intentionally focused on the Heroic tier.

After a brief intro, the book starts out with about 65 pages' worth of some great crunch and fluff, mixed together in the new style. I'll focus on this, with an eye towards whether or not it's easily portable to other settings and other games.

We start out with 13 flavorful, setting-specific themes. This year, it looks like Themes will be a major focus in new rules development, and while I love them, I also hope they don't become 4e's Prestige Classes for content bloat. Still, these are pretty spectacular, though I think that a few (*cough*Pack Outcast*cough*) may be a bit too powerful. They provide a lot of neat stuff, such as two Themes that let a character turn into animals, a Theme version of the FRPG's Spellscars, and just some general great ways to tie your character into the FR setting.
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By T. Sporcic on August 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
One of the problems with a lot of the previous 4E supplements was that they were more focused on rules (crunch) rather than roleplaying. It is obvious WotC took that criticism to heart and turned the dial up to 11 with this setting for the roleplaying side of things. I've always been a fan of the Forgotten Realms setting, and this book feels like a comfortable blast from the past. It goes into great detail on fleshing out a city in turmoil.

The character themes takes a page from Pathfinder's factions. They essentially give each character an agenda outside of their role with the party. These can give a creative GM some interesting hooks and is a welcome addition. I can give or take the Bladesinger, but more options are always welcome. The Gazetteer section is very well done, bringing a lot of interesting detail and adventure hooks to the Neverwinter region.

The Factions and Foes are the meat of the book for GMs, and it is the only area where I find fault. There are five primary factions and numerous secondary factions, all vying for control of Neverwinter or the region. I guess the thinking was "if one is good, ten are better", but I think they achieved overkill in this case. A DM is going to have to decide on the one or two factions they want to deal with, or the campaign would become overwhelming. If you incorporate all them, it will almost seem that everyone the party meets is going to have a hidden agenda. Excess paranoia can jade the party and ruin the fun.

So kudos to WotC on creating a great roleplaying supplement, but it still needs to be taken in moderation unless you and your party enjoy juggling so many competing agendas.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Justin C. Vierra on August 20, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'm not the most experienced or hardcore DM; I've only run 4e campaigns and all at the heroic tier, but I've read the Dark Sun, and Forgotten Realms campaign guides. This book is much different than previous 4e supplements, and definitely in a good way. The hooks are much better thought out, the character themes interplay very well not only with eachother but also with the city's factions, and the fluff is very deep. This might just be my style of play talking, but I really feel like the authors did a great job of giving plenty of guidance without tying your hands or railroading you. All in all, I'm very excited to run games in a Neverwinter setting.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By nick on September 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I am newer to D&D but a fan of fantasy and role-playing games. I enjoyed reading this book as much as a fantasy novel. The intrigue and interplay of all the different factions and groups vying for control, or just a stake, in Neverwinter is fun and interesting. A lot of thought and craft went into this setting, in that there is a wealth of role-playing opportunity and adventure, with an open-ended story where even characters below 10th level can have a major influence in how Neverwinter develops.

I think the themes are a great addition to my role-playing experience in that it helps me flesh out my character's personality and motives, making it more fun to play. Are you a Neverwinter noble trying to claim your birthright? A Harper agent sent to disrupt the self-proclaimed Lord of Neverwinter's heavy handed control? A shield dwarf trying to find the lost city of Gauntlgrym? A renegade red wizard of Thay? These are just a few of the paths you might choose to explore.

There are also new racial variants for Elves and Dwarves, a new class called the Bladesinger, new warpriest domains and deities, a bunch of new monsters for every faction, and descriptions of surrounding areas worth exploring like the legendary Gauntlgrym, and a nice detachable map in the back of the book.

For all this, I think the authors did a great job with the setting, and I am really enjoying it!
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