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New Atlantis Paperback – July 6, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 30 pages
  • Publisher: FQ Books (July 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003YJEQFE
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.1 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,247,862 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Kessinger Publishing reprints over 1,500 similar titles all available through Amazon.com. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

The New Atlantis by Lord Bacon is one of the most important of the Utopian writings because it envisions the advancements in all branches of learning in the Western Hemisphere. Strangely enough, Plato's description of the ancient Atlantean empire and Bacon's New Atlantis both end suddenly in the middle of a sentence. In 1660 a mysterious person known only as R.H. Esquire attempted to complete Bacon's unfinished book. There was never but one edition of New Atlantis Continued by R.H. Esquire.

This extremely rare literary curiosity belongs in all collections of Elizabethan literature and is invaluable to students of Bacon's writings and the Bacon-Shakespeare controversy.

The new edition is reset for the convenience of the modern reader, but there are no changes except the modernization of spelling and punctuation. The discussion of heraldry is of great interest to those collecting emblem books and cryptographic material in general. Certain errors in pagination may be intentional and pages in which these occur are reproduced in facsimile.

Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury, notes that this book is "a great and hardy venture to finish after Lord Verulam's pencil." Sir Edwin During-Lawrence considers this book the most significant of Utopian publications. The volume also contains a poem by George Herbert honoring Lord Bacon. For this publication, Manly P. Hall has provided an introduction suggesting the scope of the work. This edition of New Atlantis Continued is limited to one thousand copies and is likely to be the only printing available to scholars for many years to come. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

Fascinating reading and most provoking.
Anonymous
The preview gave me the impression it is more science fiction or history related book, but it's really just Bacon's idea of an perfect society.
Nathan Bales
Decent read, but a little on the boring side.
Daniel C.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 22, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It had been nearly a century since Thomas More's "Utopia" had been published, and these two classic Age of Reason utopias spurred a revitalized interest in the genre that remains unabaited to this day. However, in proposing science as the ultimate source of human salvation, Francis Bacon and Tomasso Campnaella were taking an approach quite different from More in positing his utopia.
"The New Atlantis" is the philosophical and intellectual utopia envisioned by Francis Bacon. Published in 1627, the year after the author's death by his literary executor, speculation is that Bacon wrote his story in 1623 or 1624, which would be after his fall from political power. Unlike many of his other major works, Bacon wrote "The New Atlantis" in English and then had it translated into Latin, an indication that he intended it for a wider, English-speaking audience. Bacon focuses on the duty of the state toward science, and his projections for state-sponsored research anticipate many advances in medicine and surgery, meteorology, and machinery. Although "The New Atlantis" is only a part of his plan for an ideal commonwealth, this work does represent Bacon's ideological beliefs. The inhabitants of Bensalem represent the ideal qualities of Bacon the statesman: generosity and enlightenment, dignity and splendor, piety and public spirit.
Bacon breaks from Plato, Aristotle and other ancient writers by insisting that humans do not need to aspire to fewer desires because the extraordinary advances of science would make it possible to appease bodily desires by providing material things that would satisfy human greed. For Bacon there is no reason to waste time and energy trying to get human beings to rise to a higher moral state.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Verbs on November 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I haven't read the Esquire edition, but I nevertheless would strongly suggest the regular edition. It might be interesting what someone else added to Bacon's work after the fact, but you should really read the original Bacon first.
As for the real New Atlantis, it is a great read, but it will only really make sense in combination with the New Organon. In NO, Bacon discusses his new scientific method and how it is to be carried out; in NA, he provides an idealistic society who is carrying out that method.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
Hmm, this is interesting. Despite the convoluted prose I was able to plow through this in a couple days (it's less than 50 pages long). The cover and all looks cheap on this edition but it's the content that counts, and the content is interesting. NEW ATLANTIS posits an alternate history for America and is intended to supply an example of a Utopian, scientifically overachieving society. It's an interesting look at the philosophy, symbolically expressed, of a man considered a great "rational" philosopher. Not bad.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on March 28, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very short text: 85pp for the two pieces, plus an intro. Each piece gives a brief description of one thinker's ideal world, a Utopia of a sort. This book is strengthened by presenting two such different views, casting them into sharp contrast.

The first, by Bacon, makes much of pomp, ceremony, and fine accoutrements. He starts by describing the wonderful pageant put out for any man whose living descendants exceed thirty in number. He is paraded among and served by his issue, and granted gifts by the benevolent ruler. At this point - only at this point - is a woman of the realm mentioned. His wife, should she have survived such a feat of childbearing, is to be presented as well, in a carriage, tightly enclosed. A featureless box, the best to which a woman might aspire. (Bacon goes out of his way to disparage More's Utopia, in an amusing aside.)

The remainder of the story details the alchemical feats and workshops of the land. They interested Bacon much the way a candy store might interest a child, with no thought as to how they might be provisioned or staffed. Although the many labs are of interest to today's technologist, the country's means of feeding itself and its voracious researchers remains unsaid.

Campanella's "City of the Sun" is a Utopia of very different character. Above all, it focusses its energies on war more than any other city since Sparta. He demands training in arms for men and women both from the earliest age on, though women would enter combat only in final resort. Even the infirm are put to service however they may serve: the lame can watch and guard, the blind can work in some crafts, and so on. Women are expected to participate in industry, too, except in the woodworkers' and armorers' trades.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By fritz Fratz on January 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The significance of this book speaks for itself to the knowledgeable reader. This edition , in hardcover, is the one I am glad I purchased. The Foreword is very informative and the appendix is useful with respect to an issue related to pagination in the contemporary edition. The typestyle which appears to be some sort of typewriter Courier font detracts and gives it a "term paper" feel. In this age of web publishing, there is no excuse for not using a more pleasant, and professional looking font. Nevertheless, overall an excellent version for the serious student.
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